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Pimentel, Juan R.
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Characterizing the Safety of Automated Vehicles: Book 1 - Automated Vehicle Safety

Kettering Univ.-Juan R. Pimentel
  • Progress In Technology (PT)
  • PT-203
Published 2019-03-07 by SAE International in United States
Safety has been ranked as the number one concern for the acceptance and adoption of automated vehicles since safety has driven some of the most complex requirements in the development of self-driving vehicles. Recent fatal accidents involving self-driving vehicles have uncovered issues in the way some automated vehicle companies approach the design, testing, verification, and validation of their products. Traditionally, automotive safety follows functional safety concepts as detailed in the standard ISO 26262. However, automated driving safety goes beyond this standard and includes other safety concepts such as safety of the intended functionality (SOTIF) and multi-agent safety. Characterizing the Safety of Automated Vehicles addresses the concept of safety for self-driving vehicles through the inclusion of 10 recent and highly relevent SAE technical papers. Topics that these papers feature include functional safety, SOTIF, and multi-agent safety. As the first title in a series on automated vehicle safety, each will contain introductory content by the Editor with 10 SAE technical papers specifically chosen to illuminate the specific safety topic of that book.
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The Safety of Controllers, Sensors, and Actuators: Book 5 - Automated Vehicle Safety

Kettering Univ.-Juan R. Pimentel
  • Progress In Technology (PT)
  • PT-207
Published 2019-03-07 by SAE International in United States
Safety has been ranked as the number one concern for the acceptance and adoption of automated vehicles since safety has driven some of the most complex requirements in the development of self-driving vehicles. Recent fatal accidents involving self-driving vehicles have uncovered issues in the way some automated vehicle companies approach the design, testing, verification, and validation of their products. Traditionally, automotive safety follows functional safety concepts as detailed in the standard ISO 26262. However, automated driving safety goes beyond this standard and includes other safety concepts such as safety of the intended functionality (SOTIF) and multi-agent safety. The Safety of Controllers, Sensors, and Actuators addresses the concept of safety for self-driving vehicles through the inclusion of 10 recent and highly relevent SAE technical papers. Topics that these papers feature include risk reduction techniques in semiconductor-based systems, component certification, and safety assessment and audits for vehcicle components. As the fifth title in a series on automated vehicle safety, this contains introductory content by the Editor with 10 SAE technical papers specifically chosen to illuminate the specific…
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Safety of the Intended Functionality: Book 3 - Automated Vehicle Safety

Kettering Univ.-Juan R. Pimentel
  • Progress In Technology (PT)
  • PT-205
Published 2019-03-07 by SAE International in United States
Safety has been ranked as the number one concern for the acceptance and adoption of automated vehicles since safety has driven some of the most complex requirements in the development of self-driving vehicles. Recent fatal accidents involving self-driving vehicles have uncovered issues in the way some automated vehicle companies approach the design, testing, verification, and validation of their products. Traditionally, automotive safety follows functional safety concepts as detailed in the standard ISO 26262. However, automated driving safety goes beyond this standard and includes other safety concepts such as safety of the intended functionality (SOTIF) and multi-agent safety. Safety of the Intended Functionality (SOTIF) addresses the concept of safety for self-driving vehicles through the inclusion of 10 recent and highly relevent SAE technical papers. Topics that these papers feature include the system engineering management approach and redundancy technical approach to safety. As the third title in a series on automated vehicle safety, this contains introductory content by the Editor with 10 SAE technical papers specifically chosen to illuminate the specific safety topic of that book.
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Multi-Agent Safety: Book 2 - Automated Vehicle Safety

Kettering Univ.-Juan R. Pimentel
  • Progress In Technology (PT)
  • PT-204
Published 2019-03-07 by SAE International in United States
Safety has been ranked as the number one concern for the acceptance and adoption of automated vehicles since safety has driven some of the most complex requirements in the development of self-driving vehicles. Recent fatal accidents involving self-driving vehicles have uncovered issues in the way some automated vehicle companies approach the design, testing, verification, and validation of their products. Traditionally, automotive safety follows functional safety concepts as detailed in the standard ISO 26262. However, automated driving safety goes beyond this standard and includes other safety concepts such as safety of the intended functionality (SOTIF) and multi-agent safety. Multi-Agent Safety addresses the concept of safety for self-driving vehicles through the inclusion of 10 recent and highly relevent SAE technical papers. Topics that these papers feature include vehicle interaction with other vehicles, pedestrians, bicyclists, and other road objects. As the second title in a series on automated vehicle safety, each will contain introductory content by the Editor with 10 SAE technical papers specifically chosen to illuminate the specific safety topic of that book.
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The Role of ISO 26262: Book 4 - Automated Vehicle Safety

Kettering Univ.-Juan R. Pimentel
  • Progress In Technology (PT)
  • PT-206
Published 2019-03-07 by SAE International in United States
Safety has been ranked as the number one concern for the acceptance and adoption of automated vehicles since safety has driven some of the most complex requirements in the development of self-driving vehicles. Recent fatal accidents involving self-driving vehicles have uncovered issues in the way some automated vehicle companies approach the design, testing, verification, and validation of their products. Traditionally, automotive safety follows functional safety concepts as detailed in the standard ISO 26262. However, automated driving safety goes beyond this standard and includes other safety concepts such as safety of the intended functionality (SOTIF) and multi-agent safety. The Role of ISO 26262 addresses the concept of safety for self-driving vehicles through the inclusion of 10 recent and highly relevent SAE technical papers. Topics that these papers feature include model-based systems engineering (MBSE) and the use of SysML language in a management-based approach to safety As the fourth title in a series on automated vehicle safety, this contains introductory content by the Editor with 10 SAE technical papers specifically chosen to illuminate the specific safety topic…
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Safety-Critical Automotive Systems

Kettering Univ.-Juan R. Pimentel
  • Progress In Technology (PT)
  • PT-103
Published 2006-08-01 by SAE International in United States
Safety-Critical Automotive Systems contains 40 SAE technical papers covering six years (2001-2006) of research on this developing subject. Focus is on the vehicle's most important subsystems: sensors, actuators, electronic control units (ECUs), communication systems, and software (application, middleware, drivers, etc.).
 

Design of a Safety-Critical Drive-By-Wire System using FlexCAN

Kettering University-Juan R. Pimentel
University of Padova-Manuele Bertoluzzo, Giuseppe Buja
Published 2006-04-03 by SAE International in United States
This paper describes the design of a drive-by-wire system for a commercial lift truck using the FlexCAN communication architecture. FlexCAN is a recently developed architecture based on the CAN protocol to support deterministic and safety-critical applications. The main features of FlexCAN are its simplicity and ready implementation based on COTS CAN components. The main steer-by-wire design tasks are listed and a description of how each of the tasks was accomplished using the FlexCAN architecture is detailed. A performance evaluation of the design is included.
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Verification and Validation of a Safety-Critical Steer-By-Wire System Using DO-178B

Kettering University-Juan R. Pimentel
Published 2006-04-03 by SAE International in United States
The application of DO-178B for the verification and validation of the safety-critical aspects of a steer-by-wire sub-system of a vehicle by using a spiral development model is discussed. The project was performed within a capstone design course at Kettering University. Issues including lessons learned regarding requirements, specifications, testing, verification, and validation activities as required by DO-178B are summarized.
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An Architecture for a Safety-Critical Steer-by-Wire System

Kettering University-Juan R. Pimentel
Published 2004-03-08 by SAE International in United States
A hardware and software architecture suitable for a safety-critical steer-by-wire systems is presented. The architecture supports three major failure modes and features several safety protocols and mechanisms. Failures due to component failures, software errors, and human errors are handled by the architecture and safety protocols. A test implementation using replicated communication channels, controllers, sensors, and actuators has been performed. The test implementation uses the CAN protocol, Motorola S12 microcontrollers, and Microchip MCP250XX components with a steering wheel and road wheel simulator. The focus of the paper is on the application level, using system engineering principles which incorporate a holistic approach to achieve safety at various levels.
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Modeling the Response of an Automotive Event-Based Architecture: A Case Study

Kettering University-Juan R. Pimentel
Published 2003-03-03 by SAE International in United States
While many current vehicle network systems for body bus applications use event triggered analysis processes, the deterministic point of view raises concerns about system timing due to message latency. This paper studies the latency performance characteristics of a typical body bus vehicle network using event triggered analysis over the CAN bus.
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