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Development, System Integration and Experimental Investigation of an Active HVAC Noise Control System for a Passenger Car

Fraunhofer Institute LBF-Jonathan Millitzer, Valentin Mees, Christopher Ranisch
Hyundai Motor Company-Joong-Kwan Kim, Jinmo Lee, ChiSung Oh, Kang-Duck Ih
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-1538
To be published on 2020-06-03 by SAE International in United States
Current developments in the automotive industry such as electrification and consistent lightweight construction increasingly enable the application of active control systems for the further reduction of noise in vehicles. As different stochastic noise sources such as rolling and wind noise as well as noise radiated by the ventilation system are becoming more noticeable and as passive measures for NVH optimization tend to be heavy and construction space intensive, current research activities focus on the active reduction of noise caused by the latter mentioned sources. This paper illustrates the development, implementation and experimental investigation of an active noise control system integrated into the ventilation duct system of a passenger car. Making use of a model-based design process, the development is based upon a holistic numerical simulation model integrating a reduced order acoustic model derived from finite element simulations as well as simplified loudspeaker and microphone characteristics. The numerical simulation assists the selection of a suitable loudspeaker microphone configuration, taking into account the available installation space and the integration of low-cost loudspeakers and MEMS microphones. The ventilation…
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General Motors Full Scale Wind Tunnel Upgrade

General Motors LLC-Nina Tortosa
Jacobs Technology-Paul Nagle, Tyler Brooker
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-0687
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
The General Motors Aero Lab’s Full Scale Wind Tunnel Facility, which came into operation in August of 1980, has undergone the significant upgrade of installing a state-of-the-art moving ground plane system. After almost four decades of continued use the full-scale wind tunnel also received some significant maintenance to other areas, including a new heat exchanger, main fan overhaul, and replacement of the test section acoustic treatment. A 5-belt system was installed along with an integrated vehicle lift system. The center belt measures 8m long, and can accommodate two belt widths of 1100mm and 900mm. Flow quality and other wind tunnel performance parameters were maintained to prior standards which are on par with the latest industry standards. The new 5-belt rolling road system maintains GM’s industry leading vehicle aerodynamic development and the improved acoustic panels ensure GM continues to develop vehicles with leading class acoustics.
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Continuous Integration as Mandatory Puzzle Piece for the Success of Autonomous Vehicles

iProcess LLC-Florian Rohde
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-0087
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
The transition to autonomous driving technology is widely discussed topic today. In order to make autonomous vehicles work safely in the long run it will be a necessity to keep their software up to date at any time. The challenge is that software released with today’s traditional release methods for vehicle updates is not deployed fast enough. Newly discovered corner cases or glitches in the design could restrict the usage of entire fleets for long time.This paper discusses the use of continuous integration methods implemented into the automotive system development in order to keep up with the pace needed to make the new technology a success, and accepted by the users. The development process has to contain smart branching strategies for fast turn around. It is mandatory to have a frozen and stable branch to release hotfixes in case of need, a validation branch with feature lock in order to stabilize, and a feature branch heavy development space that is supported by full system regression testing from the very beginning. The change content for validation…
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Dynamic Impact Transient Bump Method Development and Application for Structural Feel Performance

General Motors LLC-Mark Stebbins, Daryl Poirier, Rene Robert, Andrew Hornbrook
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-1081
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
Road induced structural feel “vehicle feels solidly built” is strongly related to the vehicle ride. Excellent structural feel requires both structural and suspension dynamics considerations simultaneously. Road induced structural feel is defined as customer facing structural and component responses due to tire force inputs stemming from the unevenness of the road surface. The customer interface acceleration and noise responses can be parsed into performance criteria to provide design and tuning vehicle integration program recommendations. A dynamic impact bump method is developed for vehicle level structural feel performance assessment, diagnostics, and development tuning. Current state of on-road testing has the complexity of multiple impacts, averaging multiple road induced tire patch impacts over a length of a road segment, and test repeatability challenges. A transient impact response method is developed that consists of a totally observed input at the tire interface and vehicle response, enabling time or frequency domain data processing with minimal signal processing errors. This method is adapted to the ADAMS multi-body dynamics CAE environment. Simplified vehicle integration concept case studies are assessed to establish…
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System Integration in Aircraft Environment - Hydraulic Performances through Coupled Simulations

Airbus Operations GmbH-Henning Witt lng
Airbus Operations India-Ashutosh Singh
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-0004
Published 2020-03-10 by SAE International in United States
An Airbus methodology for the assessment of accurate hydraulic performance at early program stages in the complete aircraft and power consuming systems environment based on joint collaboration with Chiastek is presented. The aim is to comfort the prediction of an aircraft hydraulic performance in order to limit the need for a physical integration test bench and extensive flight test campaign but also to avoid late system redesign based on robust early stage model based engineering and to secure the aircraft entry-into-service.
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A MATLAB Simulink Based Co-Simulation Approach for a Vehicle Systems Model Integration Architecture

Army Corps Of Engineers-Mark Bodie
PC Krause & Associates-Brian C. Raczkowski, Nicholas Jones, Tim Deppen, Charles Lucas, Rodney Yeu, Eric Walters
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-0005
Published 2020-03-10 by SAE International in United States
In this paper, a MATLAB-Simulink based general co-simulation approach is presented which supports multi-resolution simulation of distributed models in an integrated architecture. This approach was applied to simulating aircraft thermal performance in our Vehicle Systems Model Integration (VSMI) framework. A representative advanced aircraft thermal management system consisting of an engine, engine fuel thermal management system, aircraft fuel thermal management system and a power and thermal management system was used to evaluate the advantages and tradeoffs in using a co-simulation approach to system integration modeling. For a system constituting of multiple interacting sub-systems, an integrated model architecture can rapidly, and cost effectively address technology insertions and system evaluations. Utilizing standalone sub-system models with table-based boundary conditions often fails to effectively capture dynamic subsystem interactions that occurs in an integrated system. Additionally, any control adjustments, model changes or technology insertions that are applied to any one of the connecting subsystems requires iterative updates to the boundary conditions. When evaluating a large set of trade studies, the number of boundary condition models and time to generate these models…
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ZF Establishes Level 2+ ADAS

Autonomous Vehicle Engineering: March 2020

Lindsay Brooke
  • Magazine Article
  • 20AVEP03_05
Published 2020-03-01 by SAE International in United States

Cost-effective technology solutions to meet diverse customer needs are what the “new pragmatism” in driver-assistance tech is all about. Senior VP Aine Denari explains.

The wall of hype surrounding the self-driving future has given way to a new pragmatism, and engineers are breathing a collective sigh of relief. The industry, for the most part, has come to grips with the myriad challenges of making autonomous vehicles perform with utmost safety, in all driving scenarios and weather conditions. Cost sensitivity remains a significant factor, particularly in advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) whose development is closely aligned with NCAP safety requirements.

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Heterogeneous Integration Technology

Aerospace & Defense Technology: February 2020

  • Magazine Article
  • 20AERP02_08
Published 2020-02-01 by SAE International in United States

Integrating different types of devices and materials could increase their functional density, improving the performance of electro-optic systems for sensor applications.

By definition, “heterogeneous integration” (HI) refers to the integration of dissimilar components on a common platform. The term is extensively used in very diverse applications to encompass efforts to make previously separate functions operate together by an intimate fusion of components. It can mean a seamless integration of previously incompatible software, database, drugs or machine parts. The particular definition that applies here is the integration of dissimilar sensor components onto a common substrate to make new compact components that provide enhanced characteristics.

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Heterogeneous Integration Technology

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-36070
Published 2020-02-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

By definition, “heterogeneous integration” (HI) refers to the integration of dissimilar components on a common platform. The term is extensively used in very diverse applications to encompass efforts to make previously separate functions operate together by an intimate fusion of components. It can mean a seamless integration of previously incompatible software, database, drugs or machine parts. The particular definition that applies here is the integration of dissimilar sensor components onto a common substrate to make new compact components that provide enhanced characteristics.

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New Integrated Vehicle Dynamics Control System Based on the Coordination of AFS, DYC, and ED for Improvements in Vehicle Handling and Stability

SAE International Journal of Vehicle Dynamics, Stability, and NVH

University of Saida, Algeria-Norediene Aouadj, Kada Hartani, Mekri Fatiha
  • Journal Article
  • 10-04-02-0009
Published 2020-01-27 by SAE International in United States
An integrated vehicle dynamics control system aiming to improve vehicle handling and stability by coordinating active front steering (AFS), direct yaw control (DYC), and electric differential system is developed in this article. First, an electric differential system for electric vehicle, composed of two sets of bi-PMS, in-wheel motors connected in parallel and supplied by a single five-leg inverter, one on the front axle and one on the rear axle, is designed. However, each set is controlled by a proposed sliding mode backstepping control, which has replaced the hysteresis controllers in the conventional direct torque control (DTC), can obviously reduce the torque ripple, and provide better speed tracking performance using sliding mode speed controllers. Second, an integrated control system which coordinates AFS and DYC braking system is designed by using a stability index, based on stability domain in the phase plane portrait, and a gain scheduling parameter to improve vehicle steerability and maintain vehicle stability during extreme driving situations. Simulation results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed integrated vehicle dynamics control system and the overall improvements…
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