Your Selections

Semiconductors
Show Only

Collections

File Formats

Content Types

Dates

Sectors

Topics

Authors

Publishers

Affiliations

Committees

Events

Magazine

new

Low-Inductance DC Power Bus

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-36160
Published 2020-03-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Anew generation of power electronic conversion systems is being enabled by wide-bandgap (WBG) devices. Applications in civilian and defense sectors are already realizing improved power density and efficiency in power converters that utilize silicon carbide (SiC) and/or gallium nitride (GaN) switches; however, as semiconductor switches become capable of greater hold-off voltage, higher switching frequency, and higher junction temperature, limits on converter performance will depend on the remainder of the system: device packaging, filter components, and thermal management, as examples.

new

Wearable Health Tech Gets Efficiency Upgrade

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-36254
Published 2020-03-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

North Carolina State University engineers have demonstrated a flexible device that harvests the heat energy from the human body to monitor health. The device surpasses all other flexible harvesters that use body heat as the sole energy source.

new

Improved Model Predicts Heat Loss in Gallium Nitride Semiconductors

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-36189
Published 2020-03-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Engineers have found that the model currently used to predict heat loss in a common semiconductor material does not apply in all situations. By testing the thermal properties of gallium nitride semiconductors fabricated using four popular methods, they discovered that some techniques produce materials that perform better than others.

Weyl Semimetals (WSM) for Electronics Applications

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-36052
Published 2020-02-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

The major factor determining transport properties of solids is the number of electron states in a vicinity of Fermi level. In equilibrium, no macroscopic flow of electrons exists and, therefore, in order to create such flow, electrons must be excited over their equilibrium distribution. However, electrons with energies well below the Fermi level (compared to the characteristic energy scale kBT, where kB is the Boltzmann constant and T is the temperature), cannot acquire small excitation energy. Indeed, in this case, they would have energy corresponding to already occupied states, which is prohibited by the Pauli principle. In turn, well above the Fermi level, where excitation of electrons is not constrained by the Pauli principle, the electron states are not populated, thus making their contribution to the response negligible.

Q&A: A Shape-Morphing, Self-Healing Soft Composite

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35788
Published 2020-01-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Carmel Majidi, Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, and his team has developed a material with a unique combination of high electrical and thermal conductivity, with actuation and self-repair capabilities that are unlike any other soft composite.

SiC-Based Microstructures for Sensors

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35815
Published 2020-01-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Innovators at NASA's Glenn Research Center have developed ultra-thin silicon carbide (SiC) microstructures that enable highly sensitive pressure sensors that are biocompatible. The novel method of fabricating these microstructures, Dopant Selective Reactive Ion Etching (DSRIE), allows for structures as thin as 2 microns to be achieved, while allowing multifunctional sensors to be fabricated on a single SiC wafer. For the first time, it is possible to batch-fabricate ultra-thin SiC diaphragms that can sense very low pressures, enabling pressure sensors that can measure sub-psi pressures. This faster process makes it easier and less costly to produce complex, advanced semiconductors that are fully functional at temperatures greater than 600 °C. This technique enables a new generation of SiC-based microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) such as accelerometers, pressure sensors, and biosensors.

   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Semiconductor Safety Concepts for the Power Distribution of Automated Driving

SAE International Journal of Connected and Automated Vehicles

Infineon Technologies AG, Germany-Stefan Schumi
University of Technology Graz, Austria-Daniel Watzenig
  • Journal Article
  • 12-02-04-0017
Published 2019-12-18 by SAE International in United States
Automated driving is a highly complex idea. It involves mechanics, electronics and chemistry, artificial intelligence, human intelligence and high computational efforts. Apart from those aspects, the automated intelligence is run using electricity. An unintended interrupt can easily lead to a hazard. Therefore, a highly reliable power distribution has to be developed. This work focuses on the reliability calculation of such a power distribution concept. It points out what is required and will be in future such that the algorithms for the path planning and control are running in a safe environment according to the ISO 26262 standard.
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available

Method Manipulates Electrons and Transmits Information Quantum-Mechanically

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35718
Published 2019-12-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

A quantum computer operates on the principles of quantum mechanics, a unique set of rules that governs at the extremely small scale of atoms and subatomic particles. When dealing with particles at these scales, many of the rules that govern classical physics no longer apply and quantum effects emerge. A quantum computer is able to perform complex calculations, factor extremely large numbers, and simulate the behaviors of atoms and particles at levels that classical computers cannot.

Molecular Engineering for Mechanically Resilient and Stretchable Electronic Polymers and Composites

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35664
Published 2019-12-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

The ability to predict the mechanical properties of organic semiconductors is of critical importance for roll-to-roll production and thermomechanical reliability of organic electronic devices. This research describes the use of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to predict the density, tensile modulus, Poisson ratio, and glass transition temperature for poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and its blend with C60. In particular, it is shown that the resolution of the coarse-grained model has a strong effect on the predicted properties.

   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Molecular Engineering for Mechanically Resilient and Stretchable Electronic Polymers and Composites

Aerospace & Defense Technology: December 2019

  • Magazine Article
  • 19AERP12_10
Published 2019-12-01 by SAE International in United States

Establishing the design criteria for elasticity and ductility in conjugated polymers and composites by analysis of the structural determinants of the mechanical properties.

The ability to predict the mechanical properties of organic semiconductors is of critical importance for roll-to-roll production and thermomechanical reliability of organic electronic devices. This research describes the use of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to predict the density, tensile modulus, Poisson ratio, and glass transition temperature for poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and its blend with C60. In particular, it is shown that the resolution of the coarse-grained model has a strong effect on the predicted properties.

Annotation ability available