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Unsettled Impacts of Integrating Automated Electric Vehicles into a Mobility-as-a-Service Ecosystem and Effects on Traditional Transportation and Ownership

International Transportation Innovation Center (ITIC)-Joachim Taiber
  • Research Report
  • EPR2019004
To be published on 2019-11-25 by SAE International in United States
The current business model of the automotive industry is based on individual car ownership, yet new ride sharing companies such as Uber and Lyft are well capitalized to invest in large, commercially operated, on-demand mobility service vehicle fleets. Car manufacturers like Tesla want to incorporate personal car owners into part time fleet operation by utilizing their commercial fleet service. These robotaxi-fleets can be operated profitably when the technology works in a reliable manner and regulators allow driverless operation. Although Mobility-as-a-Service (MaaS) models of private and commercial vehicles fleets can complement public transportation models, they may contribute to lower public transportation ridership and thus higher subsidies per ride. This can lead to inefficiencies in the utilization of existing public transportation infrastructure. MaaS platforms can also cause a reduced reliance on parking infrastructure (e.g., street parking lanes and parking garages) which can contribute to an improvement in overall traffic flow and a reduction in capital investment for commercial and residential real estate development. Urban planning can be better centered around the true mobility needs of the citizens…
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Approach for standardization of Advanced Driving Assistance System (ADAS) in India

International Centre for Automotive Technology-Aditi Sethi
  • Technical Paper
  • 2019-28-2464
To be published on 2019-11-21 by SAE International in United States
Authors: Aditi Sethi1, Siddhanta Shrivastava2, Madhusudan Joshi3 Organization: 1,2,3 International Centre for Automotive Technology, Manesar Introduction: With the increasing utilization of electronics in Indian automobile industry, there is an essential requirement for standardizing the functional safety of sub-systems that constitute advanced driving assistance system (ADAS) as it would be the foundation stone for the automated vehicles in future. These systems assist the driver and the driving process, further increasing the car safety and road safety, subsequently reducing human error. Due to interaction of several electronic control units (ECUs) in a vehicle and complexity of the system, electronic stability plays a vital role. Therefore, the standards shall be more performance oriented and technology neutral. They shall also cover validation tests associated with safety, mechanical rigidity, durability, environmental protection and electromagnetic compatibility. Standardization of ADAS would authenticate the quality, regulate and smoothen the uniform implementation of these sub-systems. Interestingly the standardization of ADAS is in progress at the international level. It is therefore pertinent to consider adoption, formulation or both of international standards as a part of…
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Data Privacy in the Emerging Connected Mobility Services: Architecture, Use Cases, Privacy Risks, and Countermeasures

SAE International Journal of Transportation Cybersecurity and Privacy

Ford Motor Company, United States-Pramita Mitra
United States-Yu Seung Kim
  • Journal Article
  • 11-02-01-0004
Published 2019-10-14 by SAE International in United States
The rapid development of connected and automated vehicle technologies together with cloud-based mobility services is transforming the transportation industry. As a result, huge amounts of consumer data are being collected and utilized to provide personalized mobility services. Using big data poses serious challenges to data privacy. To that end, the risks of privacy leakage are amplified by data aggregations from multiple sources and exchanging data with third-party service providers, in face of the recent advances in data analytics. This article provides a review of the connected vehicle landscape from case studies, system characteristics, and dataflows. It also identifies potential challenges and countermeasures.
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Smart 24 V Battery Switch for a Reliable Redundant Power Supply in Commercial, Construction, and Agriculture Vehicles (CAV)

Infineon Technologies AG-Vincent Usseglio, Andre Mourrier
Published 2019-10-11 by SAE International in United States
For highly automated driving, commercial vehicles require an Electric/Electronic (E/E) architecture, which - in addition to sensor fusion - ensures safety-critical processes such as steering and braking at all times. Among other things, a redundant 24 V supply with corresponding disconnection is required. The battery switch is a key component. Commercial, construction, and agricultural vehicles (CAV) need to operate at the highest possible availability and the lowest possible cost of ownership. This is why automated and autonomous driving has the potential to revolutionize the CAV sector. Driverless machines can be operated around the clock and almost non-stop. Platooning allows automated, interconnected trucks to drive in a convoy and very close to each other. Platooning saves fuel. The North American Council for Freight Efficiency has calculated the following:In a scenario with two virtually connected trucks, the fuel consumption of the front vehicle is reduced by 4.5%, and by 10% in the rear vehicle, due to reduced aerodynamic drag on all of the vehicles.In a scenario with three connected trucks, platooning even leads to an average savings…
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Cutting weight seen as less vital for automated and shared vehicles

Automotive Engineering: October 2019

Paul Weissler
  • Magazine Article
  • 19AUTP10_10
Published 2019-10-01 by SAE International in United States

After long demonstrating lightweighting with steel for contemporary passenger vehicles, the Steel Market Development Institute (SMDI) is slightly changing the tune for a future of Autonomous, Connected, Electric and Shared (ACES) vehicles.

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Roush opens Advanced Durability Lab

Automotive Engineering: October 2019

Kami Buchholz
  • Magazine Article
  • 19AUTP10_12
Published 2019-10-01 by SAE International in United States

The auto industry's steady march toward electrified and automated vehicles has many suppliers affixed to the digital-testing environment rather than using traditional hardware validation.

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Connected & Autonomous Vehicles – Foundations and Business Models

  • Professional Development
  • C1951
Published 2019-09-11

The global forecasts of Connected and Autonomous Vehicles (CAV) uptake predicts a sustained market growth. Depending on the scenarios to take place the expansion in market share could be exponential.  Considering rapid technology development and moderate global L3-L5 CAV uptake, estimates a share of 25% of total annual global vehicle sales in 2035.

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Safety-Relevant Guidance for On-Road Testing of SAE Level 3, 4, and 5 Prototype Automated Driving System (ADS)-Operated Vehicles

On-Road Automated Driving (ORAD) committee
  • Ground Vehicle Standard
  • J3018_201909
  • Current
Published 2019-09-04 by SAE International in United States

This document provides safety-relevant guidance for on-road testing of vehicles being operated by prototype conditional, high, and full (Levels 3 to 5) ADS, as defined by SAE J3016. It does not include guidance for evaluating the performance of post-production ADS-equipped vehicles. Moreover, this guidance only addresses testing of ADS-operated vehicles as overseen by in-vehicle fallback test drivers (IFTD).

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About Face!

Autonomous Vehicle Engineering: September 2019

Jennifer Dukarski
  • Magazine Article
  • 19AVEP09_05
Published 2019-09-01 by SAE International in United States

To win acceptance, deployment of facial-recognition technology needs to fit within a picture-perfect consumer and legal framework that balances benefits with privacy protection.

Whether it's using your face to confirm payment over your smartphone, monitoring your child at day-camp, or being confirmed as a ticketholder going to a concert, the possibilities for facial recognition technology are virtually endless-and the technology already has become ubiquitous.

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‘Smart’ in Ohio's Heartland

Autonomous Vehicle Engineering: September 2019

Bill Visnic
  • Magazine Article
  • 19AVEP09_09
Published 2019-09-01 by SAE International in United States

With a 45-year history in vehicle testing, Ohio's Transportation Research Center launches a $45-million investment in the automated-vehicle future, becoming North America's largest dedicated AV test facility.

As notions advance regarding the evolving needs and requirements of automated-vehicle (AV) testing, there's a concurrent focus on the capabilities available from the world's comparatively meager number of suitable test facilities. Physical testing of AVs-and vehicles with advanced driver-assistance systems (ADAS)-in controlled environments is crucial, but demand for independent testing capacity continues to swell.

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