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A Parametric Study of the Flammability of Dieseline Blends with and without Ethanol

Concawe-Heather Hamje, John Rogerson
ENI Spa-Leonardo Pellegrini
Published 2019-01-15 by SAE International in United States
Low Temperature Combustion using compression ignition may provide high efficiency combined with low emissions of oxides of nitrogen and soot. This process is facilitated by fuels with lower cetane number than standard diesel fuel. Mixtures of gasoline and diesel (“dieseline”) may be one way of achieving this; however, a gasoline/diesel mixture in a fuel tank can result in a flammable headspace, particularly at very cold ambient temperatures. A mathematical model to predict the flammability of dieseline blends, including those containing ethanol, was previously validated. In this paper, that model is used to study the flammability of dieseline blends parametrically. Gasolines used in the simulations had Dry Vapour Pressure Equivalent (DVPE) values of 45, 60, 75, 90 and 110 kPa. Simulations were carried out for dieseline blends containing ethanol with two types of specifications - a fixed ethanol volume percent in the dieseline blend (0-50% ethanol), or blends containing specified EXX gasolines (E10, E20, E30, E40, E60 and E85) added to diesel fuel. Predicted Upper Flammability Limit (UFL) temperatures and blend DVPEs are presented for all…
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A Mathematical Model for the Vapour Composition and Flammability of Gasoline - Diesel Mixtures in a Fuel Tank

Concawe-Heather Hamje, David Rickeard
ENI Spa-Leonardo Pellegrini
Published 2017-10-08 by SAE International in United States
Low Temperature Combustion using compression ignition may provide high efficiency combined with low emissions of oxides of nitrogen and soot. This process is facilitated by fuels with lower cetane number than standard diesel fuel. Mixtures of gasoline and diesel (“dieseline”) may be one way of achieving this, but a practical concern is the flammability of the headspace vapours in the vehicle fuel tank. Gasoline is much more volatile than diesel so, at most ambient temperatures, the headspace vapours in the tank are too rich to burn. A gasoline/diesel mixture in a fuel tank therefore can result in a flammable headspace, particularly at cold ambient temperatures. A mathematical model is presented that predicts the flammability of the headspace vapours in a tank containing mixtures of gasoline and diesel fuel. Fourteen hydrocarbons and ethanol represent the volatile components. Heavier components are treated as non-volatile diluents in the liquid phase. The non-ideality of the blends of hydrocarbons and ethanol is accounted for using activity coefficients. Predictions for dry vapour pressure equivalent (DVPE), vapour phase composition and flammability are…
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Vapour Space Flammability Considerations for Gasoline Compression Ignition Vehicles Operating on “Dieseline” Blends.

SAE International Journal of Fuels and Lubricants

Concawe-Heather Hamje, David Rickeard
ENI Spa-Leonardo Pellegrini
  • Journal Article
  • 2016-01-2266
Published 2016-10-17 by SAE International in United States
Gasoline Compression Ignition (GCI) has been identified as a technology which could give both high efficiency and relatively low engine-out emissions. The introduction of any new vehicle technology requires widespread availability of appropriate fuels. It would be ideal therefore if GCI vehicles were able to operate using the standard grade of gasoline that is available at the pump. However, in spite of recent progress, operation at idle and low loads still remains a formidable challenge, given the relatively low autoignition reactivity of conventional gasoline at these conditions. One conceivable solution would be to use both diesel and gasoline, either in separate tanks or blended as a single fuel (“dieseline”). However, with this latter option, a major concern for dieseline would be whether a flammable mixture could exist in the vapour space in the fuel tank. It is expected that in a practical scenario, the ambient temperature would generally exceed the Lower Flammability Limit (LFL) temperature of diesel/gasoline blends. A non-flammable vapour could still be assured, however, if the temperature in the fuel tank were above…
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Modelling a Gasoline Compression Ignition (GCI) Engine Concept

Concawe-Roger F. Cracknell, Javier Ariztegui, Thomas Dubois, Heather Hamje, Leonardo Pellegrini, David Rickeard, Kenneth D. Rose
FEV GmbH-Karl Alexander Heufer, Hans Rohs
Published 2014-04-01 by SAE International in United States
Future engines and vehicles will be required to reduce both regulated and CO2 emissions. To achieve this performance, they will be configured with advanced hardware and engine control technology that will enable their operation on a broader range of fuel properties than today.Previous work has shown that an advanced compression ignition bench engine can operate successfully on a European market gasoline over a range of speed/load conditions while achieving diesel-like engine efficiency and acceptable regulated emissions and noise levels. Stable Gasoline CI (GCI) combustion using a European market gasoline was achieved at high to medium engine loads but combustion at lower loads was very sensitive to EGR rates, leading to longer ignition delays and a steep cylinder pressure rise. In general, the simultaneous optimisation of engine-out emissions and combustion noise was a considerable challenge and the engine could not be operated successfully at lower load conditions without an unrealistic amount of boost pressure.To identify ways to improve the lower load performance of a GCI engine concept, Computational Fluid Dynamics and KIVA simulations have now been…
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Impact of Fuel Properties on Advanced Combustion Performance in a Diesel Bench Engine and Demonstrator Vehicle

Chevron USA Inc.-William Cannella
Concawe-Kenneth D. Rose
Published 2010-04-12 by SAE International in United States
Six diesel, kerosene, gasoline-like, and naphtha fuels have been tested in a single cylinder diesel engine and a demonstrator vehicle, both equipped with similar engine technology and optimized for advanced combustion performance. This study was completed in order to investigate the potential to reduce engine-out emissions while maintaining engine efficiency and noise levels through changes in both engine hardware and fuel properties. The fuels investigated in this study were selected in order to better understand the effects of ignition quality, volatility, and molecular composition on engine-out emissions and performance. The optimized bench engine used in this study included engine hardware enhancements that are likely to be used to meet Euro 6 emissions limits and beyond, in part by operating under advanced combustion conditions, at least under some speed and load conditions. The engine enhancements included high fuel injection pressures, high EGR levels and charge cooling, and closed loop combustion control to ensure a constant combustion phasing with different fuels. With these modifications, it was found that the engine could run on a wide range of…
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Advanced Combustion for Low Emissions and High Efficiency Part 1: Impact of Engine Hardware on HCCI Combustion

CONCAWE-Kenneth D. Rose
Consultant, Fuels and Environment-David J. Rickeard
Published 2008-10-06 by SAE International in United States
Two single-cylinder diesel engines were optimised for advanced combustion performance by means of practical and cumulative hardware enhancements that are likely to be used to meet Euro 5 and 6 emissions limits and beyond. These enhancements included high fuel injection pressures, high EGR levels and charge cooling, increased swirl, and a fixed combustion phasing, providing low engine-out emissions of NOx and PM with engine efficiencies equivalent to today's diesel engines. These combustion conditions approach those of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI), especially at the lower part-load operating points.Four fuels exhibiting a range of ignition quality, volatility, and aromatics contents were used to evaluate the performance of these hardware enhancements on engine-out emissions, performance, and noise levels.
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Advanced Combustion for Low Emissions and High Efficiency Part 2: Impact of Fuel Properties on HCCI Combustion

CONCAWE-Kenneth D. Rose
Consultant, Fuels and Environment-David J. Rickeard
Published 2008-10-06 by SAE International in United States
A broad range of diesel, kerosene, and gasoline-like fuels has been tested in a single-cylinder diesel engine optimized for advanced combustion performance. These fuels were selected in order to better understand the effects of ignition quality, volatility, and molecular composition on engine-out emissions, performance, and noise levels. Low-level biofuel blends, both biodiesel (FAME) and ethanol, were included in the fuel set in order to test for short-term advantages or disadvantages.The diesel engine optimized in Part 1 of this study included cumulative engine hardware enhancements that are likely to be used to meet Euro 6 emissions limits and beyond, in part by operating under conditions of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI), at least over some portions of the speed and load map.
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Comparative Study of Two Different On-Board Emission Measurement Systems

Universidad Politecnica de Madrid-Jesus Casanova-Kindelan, Javier Ariztegui, Manuel Valdes
  • Technical Paper
  • 2004-05-0360
Published 2004-05-23 by Society of Automotive Engineers of Korea in South Korea
Measurement of regulated pollutant emissions of light vehicles is carried out, on a grams per kilometer basis, on roller bench tests with a CVS sampling system. However, environmental impact studies require real traffic emission data. Also, for the validation of engine emission control technologies, it is convenient to carry out real driving measurements. Both aims lead to the need of real emissions measurements during the random conditions of urban traffic using on-board emission measuring equipments.In the development of an on-board measuring system, it is necessary to account for the capacity to withstand vibrations, shortage of electric energy and very little room. A common objective of this kind of studies is to determine real-time tail-pipe emissions and to relate the emission mass flow to the instantaneous operating conditions of the engine and the vehicle. With this objective in mind, the Heat Engines Lab of the Universidad Politecnica de Madrid has undertaken the task of fitting two vehicles with equipments of two different technologies.In one case, a small gasoline engine passenger car has been equipped with sensors…