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Localization and Mapping of Unknown Locations with Unmanned Ground Vehicles

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-34340
Published 2019-05-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

The main goals of this research are to enhance a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) software platform to support unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) exploring the complex environment of tunnels, to test the platform within a simulation environment, and to validate the architecture through field- testing.

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Localization and Mapping of Unknown Locations with Unmanned Ground Vehicles

Aerospace & Defense Technology: May 2019

  • Magazine Article
  • 19AERP05_09
Published 2019-05-01 by SAE International in United States

Developing a commercial off-the shelf (COTS) software platform to enable UGVs to navigate and survive in complex environments.

The main goals of this research are to enhance a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) software platform to support unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) exploring the complex environment of tunnels, to test the platform within a simulation environment, and to validate the architecture through field-testing.

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The CAN Bus: Driving the Future of Autonomous Military Vehicles

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-34343
Published 2019-05-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

It’s a crisp November day in Michigan, and a convoy of British and American resupply vehicles are rumbling along at a comfortable 25 miles per hour. In the lead is a British Army Rheinmetall MAN Military Vehicles (RMMV) HX-60 truck, trailed closely by two U.S. Army Oshkosh Light Medium Tactical Vehicles (LMTVs). In total, there are zero humans operating this convoy.

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The CAN Bus: Driving the Future of Autonomous Military Vehicles

Aerospace & Defense Technology: May 2019

  • Magazine Article
  • 19AERP05_02
Published 2019-05-01 by SAE International in United States

It's a crisp November day in Michigan, and a convoy of British and American resupply vehicles are rumbling along at a comfortable 25 miles per hour. In the lead is a British Army Rheinmetall MAN Military Vehicles (RMMV) HX-60 truck, trailed closely by two U.S. Army Oshkosh Light Medium Tactical Vehicles (LMTVs). In total, there are zero humans operating this convoy.

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JAUS / SDP Transport Specification

AS-4JAUS Joint Architecture for Unmanned Systems Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AS5669A
  • Current
Published 2019-04-22 by SAE International in United States
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) specifies a data communications layer for the transport of messages defined by the Joint Architecture for Unmanned Systems (JAUS) or other Software Defined Protocols (SDP). This Transport Specification defines the formats and protocols used for communication between compliant entities for all supported link-layer protocols and media. Although JAUS is the SDP used as the example implemented throughout this document, AS5669 can be used for any SDP that meets the required capabilities. A Software Defined Protocol is defined as an application data interface for communicating between software elements. The SDP is agnostic of the underlying communications protocol and in fact communicates in much the same manner regardless if the communicating entities are collocated in the same memory space or separated by a satellite link.
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Unmanned Systems Terminology Based on the ALFUS Framework

AS-4JAUS Joint Architecture for Unmanned Systems Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • ARP6128
  • Current
Published 2019-04-22 by SAE International in United States
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) describes terminology specific to unmanned systems (UMSs) and definitions for those terms. It focuses only on terms used exclusively for the development, testing, and other activities regarding UMSs. It further focuses on the autonomy and performance measures aspects of UMSs and is based on the participants’ earlier work, the Autonomy Levels for Unmanned Systems (ALFUS) Framework, published as NIST Special Publication 1011-I-2.0 and NIST Special Publication 1011-II-1.0. This Practice also reflects the collaboration results with AIR5665. Terms that are used in the community but can be understood with common dictionary definitions are not included in this document. Further efforts to expand the scope of the terminology are being planned.
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JAUS Unmanned Ground Vehicle Service Set

AS-4JAUS Joint Architecture for Unmanned Systems Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AS6091
  • Current
Published 2019-04-22 by SAE International in United States
This document defines a set of standard application layer interfaces called JAUS Unmanned Ground Vehicle Services. JAUS Services provide the means for software entities in an unmanned system or system of unmanned systems to communicate and coordinate their activities. The Unmanned Ground Vehicle Services represent the platform-specific capabilities commonly found in UGVs, and augment the Mobilty Service Set [AS6009] which is platform-agnostic. At present ten (10) services are defined in this document. These services are categorized as:
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Evaluation of Navigation in Mobile Robots for Long-Term Autonomy in Automotive Manufacturing Environments

Clemson University - ICAR-Jasprit Singh Gill, Mark Tomaszewski, Yunyi Jia, Pierluigi Pisu, Venkat N Krovi
Published 2019-04-02 by SAE International in United States
In recent times, a number of reference implementations of Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) and navigation techniques have been made publicly available via the ROS Community. Several implementations have transitioned to commercial products (vacuum robots, drones, warehouse robots, etc.). However, in such cases, they are specialized and optimized for their specific domains of deployment. In particular, their success criteria have been based primarily on mission completion and safety of humans around them. In this light, deployment in any new operational design domain (ODD) requires at least a careful verification of performance and often re-optimization. We seek the technological gaps that need to be addressed to ensure the mobile robots are fit for automotive manufacturing environments. Automotive final assembly environments pose significant additional challenges for mobile robot deployment. They are replete with relatively unstructured tasks with significant uncertainty, involve tasks with skills that require robots to work in collaboration with humans and are time sensitive. Currently, metrics for evaluating mobile robot functionalities have been based on accuracy, functionality and resource consumption. In addition to these, automotive…
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Trust-Based Control and Scheduling for UGV Platoon under Cyber Attacks

Clemson University-Fangjian Li, John R. Wagner, Yue Wang
U.S. Army TARDEC-Dariusz Mikulski
Published 2019-04-02 by SAE International in United States
Unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) may encounter difficulties accommodating environmental uncertainties and system degradations during harsh conditions. However, human experience and onboard intelligence can may help mitigate such cases. Unfortunately, human operators have cognition limits when directly supervising multiple UGVs. Ideally, an automated decision aid can be designed that empowers the human operator to supervise the UGVs. In this paper, we consider a connected UGV platoon under cyber attacks that may disrupt safety and degrade performance. An observer-based resilient control strategy is designed to mitigate the effects of vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) cyber attacks. In addition, each UGV generates both internal and external evaluations based on the platoons performance metrics. A cloud-based trust-based information management system collects these evaluations to detect abnormal UGV platoon behaviors. To deal with inaccurate information due to a V2C cyber attack, a RoboTrust algorithm is designed to analyze vehicle trustworthiness and eliminate information with low credit. Finally, a human operator scheduling algorithm is proposed when the number of abnormal UGVs exceeds the limit of what human operators can handle concurrently. Representative simulation results…
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A Dynamic Local Trajectory Planning and Tracking Method for UGV Based on Optimal Algorithm

Chongqing University-Yangxin Sun, Zhenfei Zhan, Yudong Fang, Ling Zheng, Liuhui Wang, Gang Guo
Published 2019-04-02 by SAE International in United States
UGV (Unmanned Ground Vehicle) is gaining increasing amounts of attention from both industry and academic communities in recent years. Local trajectory planning is one of the most important parts of designing a UGV. However, there has been little research into local trajectory planning and tracking, and current research has not considered the dynamic of the surrounding environment. Therefore, we propose a dynamic local trajectory planning and tracking method for UGV driving on the highway in this paper. The method proposed in this paper can make the UGV travel from the navigation starting point to the navigation end point without collision on both straight and curve road. The key technology for this method is trajectory planning, trajectory tracking and trajectory update signal generation. Trajectory planning algorithm calculates a reference trajectory satisfying the demands of safety, comfort and traffic efficiency. A trajectory tracking controller based on model predictive control is used to calculate the control inputs to make the UGV travel along the reference trajectory. The trajectory update signal is generated when needed (e.g. there has a…
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