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Aluminum Beryllium, NNS Preforms Hot Isostatic Pressed 38Al - 62Be

AMS G Titanium and Refractory Metals Committee
  • Aerospace Material Specification
  • AMS7909D
  • Current
Published 2019-10-29 by SAE International in United States
This specification covers aluminum-beryllium powders consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) into the form of blocks, blanks or shapes.
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Mechanical and Corrosion Behaviour of Al 7075 Composite Reinforced with TiC and Al2O3 Particles

Vellore Institute of Technology-Subham Jaiswal, Govindasamy Rajamurugan, Prabu Krishnasamy, Yashwardhan Shaswat, Mishra Kaushik
Published 2019-10-11 by SAE International in United States
Various research regarding new types of fabrication and modifications of Aluminium alloy to improve the existing properties are going on. The wide range application of aluminium alloy is in aerospace and Automobile Industries. The demand for this material improved by mechanical properties with little to zero increment in weight. The current work is based on the fabrication of hybrid aluminium metal matrix composites with the addition of TiC (Titanium Carbide) and Al2O3 (Aluminium Oxide) reinforcement particle using stir casting technique. Three types of hybrid composite samples were prepared based on the weight percentage 5% Al2O3+0% TiC (sample-1), 8% Al2O3 + 12% TiC (sample-2), 20% Al2O3+15% TiC (sample-3). The objective of the study is to analyze the mechanical and corrosion properties of the hybrid composite with the influence of the reinforcement and varying the weight fraction of the particles. Overall, It is observed that a gradual increase in the hardness value in sample-1(83 BHN), Sample-2 (88 BHN) and sample-3 (96 BHN). This trend can be explained by the particulate strengthening of TiC over the soft ductile…
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Critical Wear Assessment of AA8011/Hybrid Metal Matrix Composites with Surface Amendment Using Friction Stir Process

Sri Krishna College of Engg. and Tech.-Soundararajan Ranganathan, Shri Vignesh Ramachandran, Ramprakash Palanivelu, Saravanakumar Ramasamy
Published 2019-10-11 by SAE International in United States
Friction Stir Process (FSP) was employed for surface modification of steel, titanium, aluminum and magnesium-based alloy has been significantly revised through the last decade. Friction Stir Process can improve surface properties such as hardness, abrasion resistance, ductility, strength, fatigue life, corrosion resistance and formability without upsetting the bulk properties of the material. The aluminum alloy having low ductility and softness characteristics are restricted because of their poor tribological properties. Preliminary studies reveal that, an ideal circumstance is to improve the aluminum alloy material life cycles by the way of strengthening the surface layer which can be modified through reinforcing nanoparticles through FSP. The main objective of the study is to improve the surface properties of AA8011 by adding nanoparticles such as SMA and silicon nitrate (Si3N4) through friction stir process. By the way, this experiment was carried out to obtain three set of samples like virgin AA8011, AA8011 with shape memory alloy and AA8011 along with shape memory alloy and silicon nitride during FSP under optimal process parametric condition. The nanoparticles distribution was improved after…
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Turning of Inconel 825 with Coated Carbide Tool Applying Vegetable-Based Cutting Fluid Mixed with CuO, Al2O3 and CNT Nanoparticles by MQL

Vellore Institute of Technology-Venkatesan Kannan, Devendiran Sundararajan
Published 2019-10-11 by SAE International in United States
Inconel 825 is nickel (Ni)-iron (Fe)-chromium (Cr) alloy with additions of copper (Cu), molybdenum (Mo), and titanium (Ti). The alloy has excellent resistance to corrosion and is often the most cost-effective alloy in sulphuric acid piping vessels and chemical process equipment. No attempt of applying MQL with three nanofluids was reported conferring to the works accessed. The present study is focused on evaluating the effect of the addition of three nanoparticles (CuO, Al2O3, and CNT) in vegetable oil applied by MQL mode during turning of Inconel 825 with coated carbide tool. Cutting force, surface roughness, and tool wear are evaluated. The results showed that the addition of nCNT substantially improved the machining performance and smaller flank the tool edge, while the adhesion and abrasion are observed as wear mechanism and better results are obtained at 0.5% of nCNT+ vegetable oil to produce the lowest values.
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Surface Modification of Aluminium Alloy 5083 Reinforced with Cr2O3/TiO2 by Friction Stir Process

Bannari Amman Institute of Technology-Dinesh Dhanabalan
Vellore Institute of Technology-Adarsh Singh, Govindasamy Rajamurugan, Prabu Krishnasamy
Published 2019-10-11 by SAE International in United States
The surface properties have a vital role in the overall performance of the parts like brake shoe pad and other frame system. The mechanical and residual stress measurements of aluminium alloy 5083 were investigated on friction stir processed plates using the reinforcements of chromium oxide (Cr2O3) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) separately as well as combination of these powders. A comparative study was made to analyze the effects of reinforcements, tool type (cylindrical and threaded), parameters and the volume fraction of the reinforcements. The mechanical properties such as surface hardness and residual stress of the friction stir processed specimens were investigated. The experimental results shows that there was a significant increase in surface hardness (118 HRC) as well as a decrease in residual stress compare to the base metal. This study also reveals that the threaded tool with a reinforcement of Cr2O3 and TiO2 reflected better mechanical properties than the cylindrical tool. The SEM images show that the uniform distribution of reinforcement in the processed zone. The surface-hardened plates can be used in brake shoe pad…
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Titanium Sheet, Strip, and Plate Commercially Pure Annealed, 70.0 ksi (485 MPa)

AMS G Titanium and Refractory Metals Committee
  • Aerospace Material Specification
  • AMS4901U
  • Current
Published 2019-10-04 by SAE International in United States
This specification covers one grade of commercially-pure titanium in the form of sheet, strip, and plate up through 1.000 inch (25.40 mm), inclusive.
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Electrifying Long-Haul Freight—Part I: Review of Drag, Rolling Resistance, and Weight Reduction Potential

SAE International Journal of Commercial Vehicles

University of Kansas, USA-Christopher Depcik, Anmesh Gaire, Jamee Gray, Zachary Hall, Anjana Maharjan, Darren Pinto, Arno Prinsloo
  • Journal Article
  • 02-12-03-0017
Published 2019-09-05 by SAE International in United States
Electric heavy-duty tractor-trailers (EHDTT) offer an important option to reduce greenhouse gases (GHG) for the transportation sector. However, to increase the range of the EHDTT, this effort investigates critical vehicle design features that demonstrate a gain in overall freight efficiency of the vehicle. Specifically, factors affecting aerodynamics, rolling resistance, and gross vehicle weight are essential to arrive at practical input parameters for a comprehensive numerical model of the EHDTT, developed by the authors in a subsequent paper. For example, drag reduction devices like skirts, deturbulators, vortex generators, covers, and other commercially available apparatuses result in an aggregated coefficient of drag of 0.367. Furthermore, a mixed utilization of single-wide tires and dual tires allows for an optimized trade-off between low rolling resistance tires, traction, and durability. Lastly, a combination of different lightweight vehicle components manufactured from aluminum and magnesium alloys, carbon fiber composites, titanium, and high-strength steel presents a substantial reduction in overall vehicle weight. Overall, a comparison of a potential EHDTT with a standard Class-8 heavy-duty tractor-trailer (HDTT) reveals a possible reduction in the aerodynamic…
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Calculation of Electron Vacancy Number in Superalloys

AMS F Corrosion Heat Resistant Alloys Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AS5491D
  • Current
Published 2019-07-24 by SAE International in United States
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) establishes a uniform procedure for calculation of electron vacancy numbers in superalloys. It is intended for use by suppliers of raw materials and parts, typically castings, for which control of electron vacancy number is required by the raw material specification.
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Machining Titanium Aero-Frames

Aerospace & Defense Technology: June 2019

  • Magazine Article
  • 19AERP06_11
Published 2019-06-01 by SAE International in United States

The rise of titanium for aerospace applications has been well documented in recent years. Equally, the challenges associated with the efficient, productive and high-quality machining of this popular material, have also been a topic of debate and scrutiny. Of course, every machine shop wants optimized performance from its cutters when milling titanium, but this can prove less than straightforward without the right technology and know-how in place. Today, however, thanks to a breakthrough in this area, things are beginning to change.

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Aerospace & Defense Technology: June 2019

  • Magazine Issue
  • 19AERP06
Published 2019-06-01 by SAE International in United States
Eyes in the Sky Rugged High-Speed Cameras Capture Critical Flight Test Video DataPanoramic Thermal Imaging Technology A New Concept in Naval DefenseCoating Technology Enables Effective Missile CountermeasuresFACE™ - Future Airborne Capability Environment Diminishing U.S. Combat Superiority Drives New Software Development RequirementsBroadband 1.2- and 2.4-mm Gallium Nitride (GaN) Power Amplifier DesignsMulti-Agent RF Propagation SimulatorElectrical Characterization of Crystalline UO2, THO2 and U0.71TH0.29O2 Evaluating the suitability of advanced alloys for use in uranium-based neutron detectors.ONR Short Pulse Research, Evaluation and non-SWaP Demonstration for C-sUAV Study Research project is designed to map small unmanned aerial vehicle (sUAV) effects space, empirically and by simulation, as a function of high power microwave (HPM) waveform to develop effective countermeasures.Matrix-Free Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Using Metal-Organic FrameworksMachining Titanium Aero-FramesGetting the Most Out of Industrial CT Scanning Industrial CT analysis software uncovers aerospace manufacturing defects that scanning alone might miss.Aerospace Work Platforms - More than Meets the Eye Today's work platforms are far more complex than the simple designs of the past.