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Simulation of Conductive and Radiated Emission for Off and On-Board Radio Receivers According to CISPR 12 and 25.

Altair Engineering-Aseim Elfrgani, C. J. Reddy
Altair ProductDesign, Inc-Dipen Das
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-1371
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
Two of the most commonly exercised standards by Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) automotive engineers are CISPR 12 and CISPR 25. Both are developed and established by EMC regulatory committee named as CISPR (International Special Committee on Radio Interference) which is a part of International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). While CISPR 12 is imposed as a regulation to ensure uninterrupted communication for off-board radio receivers, CISPR 25 is often applied to ensure the quality of services of on-board receivers. Performing these tests becomes challenging until the vehicle is prototyped which may prolong the production time in case of failure or need for modification. However, conducting these tests in simulation environment can offer more time and cost-efficient way of analyzing the electromagnetic environment of automotive vehicles. In this paper, a computational approach is proposed in order to predict electromagnetic disturbance from on-board electronics/electrical systems using 3D computational electromagnetic (CEM) tool; Altair Feko. The presented study elaborates on radiated and conductive emission simulations performed for both vehicular and component/module level EMI testing according to CISPR 12 and 25. Simulation setup…
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Leverage wireless technologies in timber harvesting to enhance operational productivity and business profitability

John Deere-Ishani Pandit, Suchitra Iyer
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-1378
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
Growing needs of forestry products; primarily wood followed by pulp and paper industry have mechanized the process of harvesting timber in most part of world. Such job sites have several machines and vehicles working together to harvest and transport the logs. Timber logging is very similar to crop harvesting with longer harvesting cycle and hence it is critical that every part of it is effectively utilized; timely harvest and transport to factories play an important role. Traditionally, these areas have had little cellular connectivity, restricting communication between operators, machines, land owners and factories. With better connectivity, it will be easier to monitor and operate job sites for example if skidder would know how many trees are felled, how many logs and bunches are created and where they are kept; it would reduce time and fuel spent in searching for logs. Also, with better communication between machines, skidder would know when to pick up logs and avoid longer wait time. Timely pick up of felled trees is critical in ensuring log quality. With upcoming wireless technologies…
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Passive RFID Tags Intended for Airborne Equipment Use

G-18 Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Aero Applications
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AS5678B
  • Current
Published 2020-02-05 by SAE International in United States
The scope of this document is to: 1 Provide a requirements document for RFID tag manufacturers to produce passive-only UHF RFID tags for the aerospace industry. 2 Identify the minimum performance requirements specific to the Passive UHF RFID Tag to be used on airborne equipment, to be accessed only during ground operations. 3 Specify the test requirements specific to Passive UHF RFID tags for airborne equipment use, in addition to EUROCAE ED-14 / RTCA DO-160 compliance requirements separately called out in this document. 4 Identify existing standards applicable to Passive UHF RFID Tag. 5 Provide a certification standard for RFID tags which will use permanently-affixed installation on airborne equipment.
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Atoms Can Receive Common Communications Signals

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35986
Published 2020-02-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

A new type of sensor was developed that uses atoms to receive commonly used communications signals. Cesium atoms were used to receive digital bits (1s and 0s) in the most common communications format used in cellphones, Wi-Fi, and satellite TV. In this format, called phase shifting or phase modulation, radio signals or other electromagnetic waves are shifted relative to one another over time. The information (or data) is encoded in this modulation. The method works across a wide range of frequencies.

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SDR Interface for the NeXtRAD Multistatic Radar System

Aerospace & Defense Technology: December 2019

  • Magazine Article
  • 19AERP12_06
Published 2019-12-01 by SAE International in United States

NeXtRAD is a dual-band, dual-polarization, multistatic radar system under development at the University of Cape Town (UCT) in col lab oration with University College London (UCL). The primary mission of the system is to collect multistatic data of small radar cross-section maritime targets embedded in sea clutter.

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WiFi-Based Technique Measures Speed and Distance of Indoor Movement

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35610
Published 2019-12-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

A technique was developed that uses a combination of WiFi signals and accelerometer technology to track devices in near-real-time. The WiFi-assisted Inertial Odometry (WIO) technique uses WiFi as a velocity sensor to accurately track how far something has moved — similar to sonar but using radio waves instead of sound waves.

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Aerospace & Defense Technology: December 2019

  • Magazine Issue
  • 19AERP12
Published 2019-12-01 by SAE International in United States
Engineered Solutions for Enclosure Sealing and InsulationTips for Reducing Error When Using Eddy Current Measuring TechniquesReducing the High Cost of TitaniumStreamlining Post-Processing in Additive ManufacturingSoftware-Defined Analog Filters: A Paradigm Shift in Radio Filter Performance and CapabilitySDR Interface for the NeXtRAD Multistatic Radar SystemElectrodeposition of Metal Matrix Composites and Materials Characterization for Thin-Film Solar Cells Metal matrix composites, which consist of silver-multiwalled carbon nanotube-silver, layer-by-layer stacks, can electrically bridge the cracks (>40 μm) that appear in semiconductor substrates and the composite grid lines.Sensing Applied Load and Damage Effects in Composites with Nondestructive Techniques Comparing and correlating piezoelectrically induced guided waves, acoustic emission, thermography, and X-ray imaging to determine the effects of applied load on a composite structure.Technology Impact Forecasting for Multi-Functional Composites Multi-functional composites offer a possible solution to the conflicting design goals of making new aircraft lighter, stronger, faster, and more environmentally sustainable.Molecular Engineering for Mechanically Resilient and Stretchable Electronic Polymers and Composites Establishing the design criteria for elasticity and ductility in conjugated polymers and composites by analysis of the structural determinants of the mechanical…

Software-Defined Analog Filters: A Paradigm Shift in Radio Filter Performance and Capability

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35665
Published 2019-12-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Among the most abundant components in all wireless system designs, analog RF filters are used to block interference from various internal and external sources. Limited spectrum divided among an ever-increasing number of users is further driving the need for these ubiquitous but in some ways anachronistic devices. Currently, interference is quite common among cellular base stations, satellite systems, radar installations, and other types of access and backhaul communications systems. Traditional filters are unable to cope with the requirements; in many cases, most often due to insufficient guard bandf. For example, in some international locales, LTE base stations and satellite receivers share the L-band frequencies. At around 3.5 GHz, 5G operators, CBRS radios, and military radars are trying to co-exist. To address this in-band interference, a new, tunable filtering technology is entering the marketplace, uniquely blending the best of both analog and digital technologies.

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Software-Defined Analog Filters: A Paradigm Shift in Radio Filter Performance and Capability

Aerospace & Defense Technology: December 2019

  • Magazine Article
  • 19AERP12_05
Published 2019-12-01 by SAE International in United States

Among the most abundant components in all wireless system designs, analog RF filters are used to block interference from various internal and external sources. Limited spectrum divided among an ever-increasing number of users is further driving the need for these ubiquitous but in some ways anachronistic devices. Currently, interference is quite common among cellular base stations, satellite systems, radar installations, and other types of access and backhaul communications systems. Traditional filters are unable to cope with the requirements; in many cases, most often due to insufficient guard bandf. For example, in some international locales, LTE base stations and satellite receivers share the L-band frequencies. At around 3.5 GHz, 5G operators, CBRS radios, and military radars are trying to co-exist. To address this in-band interference, a new, tunable filtering technology is entering the marketplace, uniquely blending the best of both analog and digital technologies.

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Avoiding Electrical Damage with Conductive Lubrication

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35293
Published 2019-10-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

At present, 12 volts are required to provide automotive electronic systems — which include vehicle lights, air conditioning, and radio — with sufficient electrical power. With each passing year, new cars get more complicated and high-tech. Additional features such as stop-start motors, hybrid motors, and turbochargers will allow for better fuel economy but will also demand more battery power.