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Waste Plastic oil used as an Alternative fuel for Aero Diesel Engines: an Analysis

GIFT, Bhubaneswar-Alok Mohapatra
VSSUT, Burla-amar kumar das
  • Technical Paper
  • 2019-01-1896
To be published on 2019-09-16 by SAE International in United States
The use of plastics and its production has seen a significant increase in recent years and accordingly the amount of plastic waste that gets accumulated in the environment has increased to an alarming level. Since plastics are primarily a petroleum based product, this increase in demand for plastics has to certain extent reduced the availability of petroleum as a non-renewable fossil fuel. One of the options to reduce the pollution due to waste plastic and create an alternate source of energy is to recycle the plastic waste by converting them into valuable energy resource. In this regard, oil derived by pyrolysis of waste plastics becomes a promising one to be used as a resource of aviation fuel. The current study analyses the oil derived by pyrolysis of waste plastics to be used in aero diesel engines. The study focusses on the use of waste plastic oil with diesel blend and compared its performance with diesel. The thermodynamic performance of the plastic oil blended with 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50% diesel are examined and related…
 
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Blocked Force Determination on Thin Plate Structures Including Applications

University of Kentucky-Keyu Chen, David Herrin
Published 2019-06-05 by SAE International in United States
Transfer path analysis is commonly used to determine input forces indirectly utilizing measured responses and transfer functions. Though it is recommended that the source should be detached from the vibrating structure when measuring transfer functions, engineers and technicians frequently have a difficult time in doing so in practice. Recently, a substitute for inverse force determination via transfer path analysis has been suggested. The indirectly determined forces are termed blocked forces and are usable so long as the source and machine are not detached from one another. Blocked forces have the added advantage of being valid even if the machine structure is modified. In this research, a typical automotive engine cover is considered as a receiver structure and is bolted to a plastic source plate excited by an electromagnetic shaker. Blocked forces are determined at different locations, and the correctness of the calculated blocked forces is assessed by comparing the predicted and simulated responses at selected receiver points which were not used for determining the blocked forces.
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Understanding the Stick Slip Behavior of Plastics and Target Setting: An OEM Perspective

Mahindra & Mahindra, Ltd.-Sundaralingam Somasundharam, Amit Kumar, Riyazuddin Mohammed, Prasath Raghavendran
Published 2019-06-05 by SAE International in United States
Automotive OEMs are aggressively using different materials for interiors due to value proposition and variety of options available for customers in market. Excessive usage of different grade plastics with zero gap philosophy can cause stick slip effect leading to squeak noise. Even though systems and subsystems are designed using best practices of structural design and manufacturing tolerances, extreme environmental conditions can induce contacts leading to squeak noise. Appropriate selection of interface material pairs can minimize the possibilities of squeak conditions. Stick-slip behavior of different plastics is discussed in the present study, along with critical parameters during material compatibility testing in a tribological test stand. Friction coefficient of different material pairs for a defined normal load and sliding velocity are analyzed for patterns to recognize squeaks versus time. An OEM perspective is presented with focus on material selection using objective metrics like coefficient of friction and set targets for raw material suppliers regarding compatible materials. In the next step, an algorithm based on machine learning approach has been developed for estimating stick-slip performance.
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Joining Gun Bonds Metal and Plastic in Seconds

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-34612
Published 2019-06-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

The connection of plastics and metals poses a challenge due to the different physical properties of the two materials. All conventional joining options, such as bonds using adhesives or rivets, have their disadvantages — adhesives need time to harden, which delays further processing, and plastics can be easily damaged during riveting. Furthermore, both adhesive bonding and riveting require additional materials that increase production costs.

 
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Insert, Screw Thread, Self Locking Plastic Locking Device, Solid Film Lubricated, Self-Broaching Keys, UNS S66286

E-25 General Standards for Aerospace and Propulsion Systems
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AS3502A
  • Current
Published 2019-05-24 by SAE International in United States

Scope is unavailable.

 
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Bearings, Fiber Reinforced Plastic, Sleeve, Plain and Flanged, Self-Lubricating; General Specification for

ACBG Plain Bearing Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AS85560C
  • Current
Published 2019-05-23 by SAE International in United States

This standard defines the requirements for fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) composite plain and flanged sleeve bearings that are self-lubricating and which are compatible with graphite-epoxy composites.

 

The economics of materials selection

Automotive Engineering: May 2019

Lindsay Brooke
  • Magazine Article
  • 19AUTP05_02
Published 2019-05-01 by SAE International in United States

Cost per pound of reduced vehicle mass is helping to drive innovation in steel, aluminum and carbon composites.

“We've entered an era where true weight reductions in vehicles are occurring,” noted Dr. Alan Taub, professor of Material Science & Engineering at the University of Michigan. “There is no new vehicle launch that doesn't talk about a 5-10 percent reduction in curb weight because it's now clearly a part of fuel economy. And while the gains are still coming from powertrain improvements and the introduction of partial and full electrification, about 15 percent of fuel-economy improvements today come from vehicle weight reduction.” His rule of thumb: Decreasing vehicle weight by 10% yields a 6% improvement in fuel economy.

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Material Could Make Plastic Manufacturing More Energy-Efficient

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-34391
Published 2019-05-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Anew material was developed that can extract the key ingredient in the most common form of plastic from a mixture of other chemicals while consuming far less energy than usual. The material is a metal-organic framework (MOF), a class of substances that has repeatedly demonstrated a talent for separating individual hydrocarbons from organic molecules produced by oil-refining processes. MOFs hold immense value for the plastic and petroleum industries because of this capability, which could allow manufacturers to perform these separations far more cheaply than standard oil-refinement techniques.

 

Designs to Dye for: Autonomy's New-Materials Revolution

Autonomous Vehicle Engineering: May 2019

Stuart Birch
  • Magazine Article
  • 19AVEP05_05
Published 2019-05-01 by SAE International in United States

From pineapples to bacteria, Envisage's research is focused on new mobility's ‘inside’ story.

Evolving vehicle engineering constantly reshapes vehicle architectures. But along with electrified drive-trains and autonomous capabilities is the need for a mindset shift in materials, opening the way for new sustainable solutions in color, materials and finish (CMF). Future cabins could have pineapple, banana, coconut and eucalyptus among the material solutions-with bacteria playing a potentially positive role.

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Method Shrinks Objects to the Nanoscale

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-34408
Published 2019-05-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Existing techniques for creating nano-structures are limited in what they can accomplish. Etching patterns onto a surface with light can produce 2D nano-structures but doesn’t work for 3D structures. It is possible to make 3D nano-structures by gradually adding layers on top of each other, but this process is slow and challenging. And while methods exist that can directly 3D-print nanoscale objects, they are restricted to specialized materials like polymers and plastics that lack the functional properties necessary for many applications. Also, they can only generate self-supporting structures; for example, the technique can yield a solid pyramid, but not a linked chain or a hollow sphere.