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Thesaurus for Fuel System Components

AE-5A Aerospace Fuel, Inerting and Lubrication Sys Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AIR1615B
  • Current
Published 2020-02-24 by SAE International in United States
This document provides a summary of names commonly used throughout the industry for aircraft fuel system components. It is a thesaurus intended to aid those not familiar with the lexicon of the industry.
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2018 Create the Future Design Contest: Automotive/Transportation Category Winner

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-33319
Published 2018-11-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States
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Design and Operating Requirements of the Onboard Aircraft Refueling System and Associated Ground Refueling Equipment Interface

AE-5A Aerospace Fuel, Inerting and Lubrication Sys Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AS5751
  • Current
Published 2018-03-18 by SAE International in United States
This SAE Aerospace Specification (AS) is applicable to all aircraft. This AS defines the minimum design and operating requirements for the aircraft refueling interface. These requirements establish the minimum criteria for the aircraft design that provides practical standardized refueling system requirements, provides minimum standardized criteria for the operation and performance of any aircraft refueling equipment, and establishes an integrated minimum performance for aircraft refueling operations. This standardization provides the minimum design criteria to assure full compatibility between the aircraft refueling system connection point(s), aircraft operating characteristics, and the design and operation of ground based aircraft refueling equipment in all steady state and dynamic refueling and defueling conditions. The criteria that shall be used to test the operation and performance of the aircraft refueling system and equipment are also specified. Compliance to this AS shall be deemed to mean that the aircraft or aircraft refueling equipment are in compliance with this standard when the refueling system is tested as per the test requirements specified in ARP5918 (mobile systems). This document covers all types of ground aircraft…
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Automotive Powertrain Sensors: Trends & Forecasts to 2021

John Day's Automotive Electronics-John Day
  • Market Research Report
  • MR-AB-016
Published 2015-01-01 by ABOUT Publishing Group in United Kingdom
Two major concerns for automotive engineers are how best to maximize fuel economy and to reduce emissions. Powertrain sensors, which measure temperature, pressure, rotational speed and other vehicle performance parameters, are central to both. There is also a trend in the powertrain sensor industry toward higher temperature and electromagnetic compatibility requirements, due largely to the increasing deployment of smaller engines. This exclusive report from ABOUT Automotive focuses on the following key areas: Temperature sensors: • Manifold air temperature sensor • Engine coolant temperature sensor • Transmission oil temperature sensor • Engine oil temperature sensor • Boost air temperature sensor Pressure sensors: • Manifold absolute pressure (MAP) sensors • Barometric pressure (BARO) sensors • Engine oil pressure sensors • Fuel rail pressure sensors • Boost pressure sensors • Air conditioning (A/C) pressure sensors • Brake vacuum pressure sensors Speed sensors: • Transmission input speed sensors • Transmission output speed sensors • Vehicle speed sensors Position sensors: • Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) position sensors • Pedal position sensors • Throttle position sensors • Camshaft position sensors •…
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Guidance for the Design and Installation of Fuel Quantity Indicating Systems

AE-5A Aerospace Fuel, Inerting and Lubrication Sys Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AIR5691
  • Historical
Published 2013-01-04 by SAE International in United States
This document is applicable to commercial and military aircraft fuel quantity indication systems. It is intended to give guidance for system design and installation. It describes key areas to be considered in the design of a modern fuel system, and builds upon experiences gained in the industry in the last 10 years.
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Color-Changing Sensors for Detecting the Presence of Hypergolic Fuels

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-15456
Published 2013-01-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Hypergolic fuel sensors were designed to incorporate novel chemo chromic pigments into substrates for use in various methods of leak detection. There are several embodiments to this invention that would provide specific visual indication of hypergols used during and after transfer. The ability to incorporate these pigments into various polymer matrices provides a unique opportunity to manufacture nearly any type of sensor shape that is required. The vibrant color change from yellow to black instantaneously shows the worker the presence of hypergols in the area, providing the worker the ability to immediately evacuate the area.

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An Onboard Ethanol Concentration Sensor for the Brazilian Market

Continental Automotive Group-Brian McKay, Isaac VanVelzen, Conrado Guth, Erwin Achleitner, Peter Biber
Published 2012-10-02 by SAE International in United States
A flex fuel engine is capable of operating efficiently on any combination of gasoline and ethanol. However, an engine combustion strategy must adapt quickly to a change in ethanol concentration after a refueling event in order to achieve optimum engine combustion. Typical control systems rely on an exhaust gas oxygen sensor (lambda) to measure changes in oxygen concentration following combustion. This feedback control approach can take five to ten minutes to detect the fuel change and correct the combustion strategy. This relatively long lag time could result in suboptimal engine performance such as a loss of engine power, engine knocking, poor cold start performance, unburned hydrocarbons, and high pollutant emissions. To counter this shortcoming, an on-board flex fuel sensor (FFS) was developed to enable a feed-forward control strategy. The FFS may be installed inline between the fuel tank and fuel injector and measure the fuel prior to it reaching the injector. The FFS sensor estimates the concentration of ethanol in the fuel in real-time using a correlation based on permittivity, conductivity, and temperature of the…
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Improving Upon Best Available Technology: A Clean Flex Fuel Snowmobile

University of Wisconsin-Nicholas Rakovec, Brian Olenski, Michael Maney, Glenn R. Bower
Published 2008-09-09 by SAE International in United States
The University of Wisconsin-Madison Snowmobile Team has designed and constructed a clean, quiet, high performance snowmobile for entry in the 2008 Society of Automotive Engineers' Clean Snowmobile Challenge. Built on a 2003 cross-country touring chassis, this machine features a 750 cc fuel-injected four-stroke engine equipped with a fuel sensor which allows operation ranging from regular gasoline to an 85% blend of ethanol and gasoline (E85). The engine has been customized with a Mototron control system which allows for full engine optimization using a range of fuels from E00 to E85. Utilizing a heated oxygen sensor and a 3-way catalyst customized for this engine by W.C. Heraeus-GmbH, this sled reduces NOx, HC and CO emissions by up to 89% to an average specific mass of 0.484, 0.154, 4.94 g/kW-hr respectively. Finally, the Mototron system also allowed Wisconsin to extract another 4 kW from the Weber 750cc engine; producing 45 kW and 65 Nm of torque. A two stage muffler system along with sound absorbing material under the hood combines to reduce the sound levels to 71…
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Process for Comprehension Testing of In-Vehicle Icons

Safety and Human Factors Standards Steering Committee
  • Ground Vehicle Standard
  • J2830_200807
  • Historical
Published 2008-07-22 by SAE International in United States
This document describes a process for testing the comprehension of symbols or icons. Although the process may be used to test any symbols or icons, it has been developed specifically for testing ITS active safety symbols or icons (e.g., collision avoidance), or other symbols or icons that reflect some in-vehicle ITS message or function (e.g., navigation, motorist services, infotainment). Within the process, well-defined criteria are used to identify the extent to which the perceived meaning matches the intended meaning for a representative sample of drivers. Though the process described below reflects a paper-and-pencil approach to conducting the testing, electronic means (i.e., conducted using a computer) can be used as well. The data or results from this process are analyzed to assess the drivers’ comprehension of the symbol or icon. These data will be used to provide guidance in the design of in-vehicle symbols or icons.
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Novel Fuel Sensor - Innovation for Cold Start Improvement and for the Prevention of Misfuelling

Hella KGaA Hueck & Co.-Hagen Müller, ürgen Krome, Uwe Kühnau
Published 2007-04-16 by SAE International in United States
The fuel sensor determines quickly and reproducibly the evaporation characteristics of the fuels based on the heat flow of a heating element. Thus the micro sensor can classify the cold start characteristics of the different Gasoline fuels and can distinguish different diesel derivatives. For diesel vehicles, an electronic false refueling protection was realized based on a sensor installation into the fuel receptacle. It combines the advantages of an analysis of the diesel derivatives with that of a fast warning in the case of misfuelling.
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