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Performance Study of an Innovative Collaborative Robot Gripper Design on Different Fabric Pick and Place Scenarios

University of Windsor-Morteza Alebooyeh, Bowen Wang, Ruth Jill Urbanic
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-1304
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
Light-weighting fiber composite materials introduced to reduce vehicle mass and known as innovative materials research activities since they provide high specific stiffness and strength compared to contemporary engineering materials. Nonetheless, there are issues related automation strategies and handling methods. Material handling of flexible textile/fiber components is a process bottleneck and it is currently being performed by setting up multi-stage manual operations for hand layups. Consequently, the long-term research objective is to develop semi-automated pick and place processes for flexible materials utilizing collaborative robots within the process. The immediate research is to experimentally validate innovatively designed grippers for efficient material pick and place tasks. Pick and place experiments on a 0/90 plain woven carbon fiber fabric with an innovative gripper design is tested using a YuMi 14000 ABB collaborative robot to validate the new-designed gripper enhanced performance on the slippage and material wrinkling based on the previous research [20] for two gripping forces, and two travel speeds. Also, different double arm pick and place scenarios are sought to achieve an acceptable approach through which fabric wrinkling…
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Phenolic SMC for Fire Resistant Electric Vehicle Battery Box Applications

Hexion Inc.-Ian Swentek, Cedric A. Ball, Stephen Greydanus, Kameswara Rao Nara
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-0771
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
Phenolic resins that meet REACH compliance and contain lower free-formaldehyde are safer to handle, compound, and mold. These resin systems do not contain any styrene or require any fillers to achieve their rated fire resistance. A commercial phenolic sheet-molding compound (SMC) is presented that achieves a 2-minute cycle time and addresses the unique requirements in an electrified vehicle architecture. This new SMC material includes all the industrially relevant considerations including material processing, shelf life, and surface finish. Other topics such as material hybridization and comparison to incumbent materials also discussed.The resin system uses a water-based phenolic resole which is acid-cured. This chemistry presents several unique challenges and opportunities for the industry such as managing formulation pH and appropriate methods for quality control.A demonstrator battery cover highlights the superior fire performance, impact resistance, and light weighting that is achieved with this resin technology. The phenolic SMC formulation is compatible with already established engineering fibers and textiles resulting in low-shrink, creep-resistant composites. The mechanical performance demonstrates strength and impact energy absorption greater than cast aluminum, with over…
new

Leading Women in Engineering & Science: Yolita Wildman Nugent, Director, Advanced Soft Systems Integration, Flex

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-36250
Published 2020-03-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States
new

Production Method for High-Performance Polymer

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-36197
Published 2020-03-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

A method was developed to produce a polymer material called PBO — known commercially as Zylon — that’s used in bulletproof vests and other high-performance fabrics. The new approach could be useful in making PBO products that resist degradation — a problem that has plagued PBO-based materials in the past.

Q&A: Electrically Conductive Coated Yarn for Wearable, Washable Fabrics

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35982
Published 2020-02-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Professor Genevieve Dion, Director of Drexel University's (Philadelphia, PA) Center for Functional Fabrics, is collaborating with other experts to coat yarn with the highly conductive, two-dimensional material MXene. They demonstrated that the yarn could be used with standard textile manufacturing techniques to create wearable conductive fabric.

Threads Detect Gases When Woven into Clothing

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35989
Published 2020-02-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

A fabrication method was developed to create dyed threads that change color when they detect a variety of gases. The threads can be read visually or even more precisely by use of a smartphone camera, to detect changes of color due to analytes as low as 50 parts per million. Woven into clothing, the gas-detecting threads could provide a reusable, washable, and affordable safety asset in medical, workplace, military, and rescue environments.

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Increased resistance to dirt and staining on artificial leather

Ford Motor Company Brazil-Santana Sheilla, Yoshimura Patrícia, Marcal João, Hurtado Luiz, Montenegro Eloy, Neto Paulo
  • Technical Paper
  • 2019-36-0123
Published 2020-01-13 by SAE International in United States
The design trend for interior parts of cars in light colors in shades of beige and grey is a global reality and has increased the demand in new models replacing traditional black color. One of the most important features for the appearance is to keep the color and stay clean the surface of the car interior parts. This development aims to improve the resistance to dirt and staining on artificial leather applied in seat cover with light colors. Comparative dirt and staining trials were conducted with soil, coffee and indigo jeans through abrasion testing by Crocking, followed by clean fabric removal. The performance evaluation was done by through microscopy assays, spectrophotometry to analyze color variation after dirt test in the original samples and dirt test in the same samples exposed to XENON and heat for aging. Finally, this development brings solutions that improves consumer satisfaction. The improved life cycle performance of the car seat surfaces kept clean is the core of this study. This improvement to protect surfaces and prevent it from staining on the…
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New Silk Materials Can Wrinkle into Detailed Patterns, Then Unwrinkle to Be “Reprinted”

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35620
Published 2019-12-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Researchers at Tufts University School of Engineering have developed silk materials that can wrinkle into highly detailed patterns — including words, textures, and images as intricate as a QR code or a fingerprint. The patterns take about one second to form, are stable, but can be erased by flooding the surface of the silk with vapor, allowing the researchers to “reverse” the printing and start again. In an article published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers demonstrate examples of the silk wrinkle patterns, and envision a wide range of potential applications for optical electronic devices.1

Method Makes Transistors and Electronic Devices from Thread

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35467
Published 2019-11-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

A transistor has been made from linen thread, enabling the creation of electronic devices made entirely of thin threads that could be woven into fabric, worn on the skin, or implanted surgically for diagnostic monitoring. The flexible electronic devices could enable a range of applications that conform to different shapes and allow free movement without compromising function.

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Squeak Behavior of Plastic Interfaces

Auto & Truck Services-Lokesh Pancholi
Published 2019-10-11 by SAE International in United States
Automotive is getting advanced and increasingly comfortable with new technologies and demand from customers. Car cabins have become much quieter as compared yesteryears. Where the outside noise has gone down significantly, secondary and small noises like squeak and rattle have become more prominent. Squeak though a transient and short lived, is an unexpected noise and often considered as an irritant. There is an increasing need felt to eliminate squeak completely from the interiors of the vehicle where choice materials play dominant role. This article briefs about the work done on evaluating different plastic interfaces for squeak behavior using Stick-Slip method. Some plastic surfaces were even tested with other interfaces like leather and vinyl coated fabrics. Choice of plastic material and interfaces to be tested were shortlisted after studying many different vehicles and benchmarking. Difference in squeak was also studied with respect to external conditions like temperature, velocity of interfaces, normal force, humidity and roughness. The result of any test is measured in the form of Risk Priority Number (RPN) where higher the RPN, higher is…
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