The SAE MOBILUS platform will continue to be accessible and populated with high quality technical content during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. x

Your Selections

Entry, descent, and landing
Show Only

Collections

File Formats

Content Types

Dates

Sectors

Topics

Authors

Publishers

Affiliations

Committees

Events

Magazine

   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Design Optimization and Aerodynamic Analysis of a Hybrid Blended Wing Body- VTOL Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

Delhi Technological University-Pranav Bahl, Vikas Rastogi, Amit bainsla, Nitin Sharma
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-0472
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) can be effectively used to serve humanitarian relief efforts during environmental disasters. Designing such UAVs presents challenges in optimizing design variables such as maximizing endurance, maneuverability and payload capacity with minimum launch and recovery area. The Blended Wing Body (BWB) is a novel aircraft configuration offering enhanced performance over conventional UAVs. Designing a blended wing configuration UAV takes into account interdependency between aerodynamic performance and stability. Designing BWB is peculiar and is investigated in this paper with a view to achieve an aerodynamically stable and structurally sound configuration. The designed UAV is a hybrid of a tailless blended-wing-body and a tri-copter configuration with two forward tilt motors for transition into cruise flight after vertical take-off and back to multirotor while landing (VTOL-Vertical Take Off and Landing). The BWB is iteratively optimized in XFLR-5 for Dynamic and static stability. The wing design was optimized for aerodynamic and structural fitness in MATLAB using Meta-heuristic optimization methodology based on genetic evolutionary algorithm. The 3D CAD design was conceived on SolidWorks and analyzed in Pressure…
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Aerodynamic Design and Analysis of a Formula SAE Drag Reduction System (DRS)

University of Manitoba-David J. Penner
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-0685
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
Formula SAE vehicles, like many other vehicles within the realm of motorsport, often employ rear mounted aerodynamic devices to improve cornering performance, these devices can however have a significant amount of aerodynamic drag. Additional speed can be gained by reducing the impact of the rear wing on the straightaways of the track through the use the aptly named Drag Reduction System (DRS), which works by reducing the angle of attack of the rear wing flap(s). A DRS can however introduce other performance losses, including the losses from having a gap between the rear wing flaps and endplate to prevent friction, the potential to stall the rear wing from improper opening angles of the flaps, and from the wake of the DRS actuator if positioned in front of the airfoils. An additional concern is the time it takes for the rear wing performance to return upon DRS deactivation, which will affect how long before corner entry the driver must disable the system. Insight into each of these problems as well as the optimum opening angles was…
new

Multiple Sensors Aid in Development of an Electrical Vertical Takeoff and Landing Aircraft

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-36157
Published 2020-03-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Beta Technologies (South Burlington, VT) has built a prototype Electrical Vertical Takeoff and Landing aircraft (eVTOL) and is putting it through the wringer. They are using wireless sensor systems from Parker LORD, MicroStrain® Sensing Systems (Williston, VT) to monitor the structures and functions of the prototype, both on a test stand and in flight.

   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.
new

Landing Gear Fatigue Spectrum Development For Part 25 Aircraft

A-5B Gears, Struts and Couplings Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AIR5914
  • Current
Published 2020-02-28 by SAE International in United States
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) provides guidelines for the development of landing gear fatigue spectra for the purpose of designing and certification testing of Part 25 landing gear. Many of the recommendations herein are generalizations based on data obtained from a wide range of landing gears. The aircraft manufacturer or the landing gear supplier is encouraged to use data more specific to their particular undercarriage whenever possible.
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.
new

Maintenance of Pitot-Static Systems of Transport Aircraft

A-4 Aircraft Instruments Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AIR975B
  • Current
Published 2020-02-20 by SAE International in United States
In efforts to increase the accuracy and reliability of altimetry, speed measurement and other aspects of air data, a great deal of attention and money have been expended on new and refined pressure transducing and computing systems and on the standards by which they are calibrated. So much progress has been made in this that the limiting factor is, or may soon be, the sensing and transmitting in the aircraft of the pressures to be transduced. Until the appearance of References 1-13 and 18 there was little guidance available on the maintenance of pitot and static systems. This report presents what information is available, suggests limits, and lists the principal original papers on the subject.
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.
new

Aircraft Instrument and Instrument System Standards: Wording Terminology, Phraseology, Environment and Design Standards For

A-4 Aircraft Instruments Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AIR818E
  • Current
Published 2020-02-20 by SAE International in United States
This Aerospace Standard, (AS), specifies minimum performance standards for _____________ (Instrument or instrument systems) which are primarily intended for use with (vehicles capable of flight), ((fixed wing, rotary wing) aircraft)), (other special modifiers); (and whose purpose is to display _____________ information).
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available

Modified Fittings Enhance Industrial Safety

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-36000
Published 2020-02-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida is home to one of the largest buildings in the world — the massive Vehicle Assembly Building — and also hosts a number of one-of-a-kind facilities. The more than 30-mile-long campus has witnessed every launch from the Space Shuttle Launch Pad as well as many homecomings at the Shuttle Landing Facility. Just as important, the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) has seen each element of the International Space Station (ISS) that passes through Kennedy before it goes into orbit.

Flow Disruption Devices for the Reduction of High Lift System Noise

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35792
Published 2020-01-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

During airport approach and landing, airstream noise is a dominant aircraft noise source, and the noise that is generated at the side edges of the deployed flaps, elevons, and slats is an important component of that noise. The noise radiating from these side edges is caused by their interaction with the strong vortex systems that are present along these edges. The purpose of flow disruption devices is to reduce that noise.

A Vision-Based Lunar Navigator for Next-Generation Landers

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35471
Published 2019-11-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

In July of 2015, NASA published NASA Technology Roadmaps — TA9: Entry, Descent, and Landing Systems (EDL). In it, they laid out their EDL goals for the coming years: To develop new and innovative technology, not just for the moon, but also for future exploration throughout our solar system. Toward achieving these goals, NASA awarded a contract to the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, or Draper for short, to develop and test their multi-environment navigator (DMEN), which uses vision-based navigation techniques, as a means to guide small craft to land on the moon.

Aircraft Vertical Takeoff and Landing

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35284
Published 2019-10-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

NASA’s Langley Research Center developed an inexpensive, long-endurance, vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). It is capable of flying for 24 hours, landing in a 50 × 50 zone, and can be loaded into the back of a cargo van for easy transport. In addition, it can land in either a horizontal or vertical flight configuration.