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Avoiding Electrical Damage with Conductive Lubrication

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35293
Published 2019-10-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

At present, 12 volts are required to provide automotive electronic systems — which include vehicle lights, air conditioning, and radio — with sufficient electrical power. With each passing year, new cars get more complicated and high-tech. Additional features such as stop-start motors, hybrid motors, and turbochargers will allow for better fuel economy but will also demand more battery power.

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Development of Dynamics Analysis Methodology for Front Loading Design Process of “Motor on Caliper”

Mando Brake-Jinsuk Song
Published 2019-09-15 by SAE International in United States
The current mega trend in the automobile industry are that of electronic systems. Amid this trend, the demand is also increasing for motorized conventional chassis products. As a result, we will be dealing with more complex designs and validations than conventional mechanical products.On the other hand, another issue in the industry is using simulation for front load design decisions. The concept of “Front Loading” is not entirely new to automotive manufacturers, who are becoming adept at eliminating cost, materials, time and waste from the design process. However, front loading is still needed in all units, and the simulation across the system is immature as ever.In this paper, we would like to show how to implement a more efficient design process by using simulation for front loading to new concept design of “Crossed Helical Gear Type - Motor on Caliper”. Also, it contains the simulation techniques and the fundamental methods studied to build this design process.
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EDITORIAL: There is no substitute for ‘Automotive Grade’

Automotive Engineering: September 2019

Editor-in-Chief-Lindsay Brooke
  • Magazine Article
  • 19AUTP09_05
Published 2019-09-01 by SAE International in United States

When you get in a vehicle and push the ‘start’ button, you're betting that the machine will get you to your destination safely and reliably, regardless of the driving conditions. Lives are at stake the moment you lift off the brake pedal.

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Facility Focus: Georgia Tech Research Institute

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35142
Published 2019-09-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

The Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) is the nonprofit applied research division of the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) in Atlanta, GA. Founded in 1934 as the Engineering Experiment Station, GTRI supports eight laboratories in more than 20 locations around the country and performs more than $370 million of research annually for government and industry.

Using Laser Metal Printing to Cool Computer Chips

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-34595
Published 2019-06-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Traditionally, electronics are cooled using a heat sink that transfers the heat generated by the electronic system into the air or a liquid coolant. For the heat sink to work, it has to be attached to the CPU or the graphics processor via a thermal interface material such as thermal paste. It helps facilitate the transfer of heat by bridging microscopic gaps between the heat sink and the chip.

Self-Powered Wearable Tech

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-34560
Published 2019-06-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Researchers have created highly stretchable supercapacitors for powering wearable electronics. The newly developed supercapacitor has demonstrated solid performance and stability, even when it is stretched to 800 percent of its original size for thousands of stretching/relaxing cycles.

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General Motors UART Serial Data Communications

Vehicle E E System Diagnostic Standards Committee
  • Ground Vehicle Standard
  • J2740_201905
  • Current
Published 2019-05-20 by SAE International in United States
This Technical Information Report defines the General Motors UART Serial Data Communications Bus, commonly referred to as GM UART. This document should be used in conjunction with SAE J2534-2 in order to enhance an SAE J2534 interface to also provide the capability to program ECUs with GM UART. SAE J2534-1 includes requirements for an interface that can be used to program certain emission-related Electronic Control Units (ECUs) as required by U.S. regulations, and SAE J2534-2 defines enhanced functionality required to program additional ECUs not mandated by current U.S. regulations. The purpose of this document is to specify the requirements necessary to implement GM UART in an enhanced SAE J2534 interface intended for use by independent automotive service facilities to program GM UART ECUs in General Motors vehicles.
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Interface Standard, Airborne EO/IR Systems, Maintenance and Test

AS-1C Avionic Subsystems Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AS6165A
  • Current
Published 2019-05-14 by SAE International in United States
This standard defines the use of data interfaces between a host platform and an electro-optic/infrared (EO/IR) system for maintenance and test (M&T) purposes. In particular, this standard defines the use of the data interfaces in order to facilitate the: a confirmation of system performance and function; b external initiation of built-in-test (BIT) functions; c performance of other diagnostic tests of system health; d downloading M&T data; e uploading software changes. This standard does not cover mechanical or electrical interfaces, nor does it define the basic platform-to-sensor communication protocols and formats. Furthermore, this standard does not address software changes that are made by the manufacturer and not accessible at the sensor interfaces. Data protocols and formats are covered by AS6135. Electrical interfaces are covered by AS6129. This standard covers the use of the interfaces defined by AS6129 and AS6135 for the purposes described herein.
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Medium-Frequency Transformer Transitions from AC to DC

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-34410
Published 2019-05-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Traditionally, electronics are cooled using a heat sink that transfers the heat generated by the electronic system into the air or a liquid coolant. For the heat sink to work, it has to be attached to the CPU or the graphics processor via a thermal interface material such as thermal paste. It helps facilitate the transfer of heat by bridging microscopic gaps between the heat sink and the chip.

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An Assessment of a Sensor Network Using Bayesian Analysis Demonstrated on an Inlet Manifold

Caterpillar-Leo Shead
Loughborough University-Rhys Comissiong, Thomas Steffen
Published 2019-04-02 by SAE International in United States
Modern control strategies for internal combustion engines use increasingly complex networks of sensors and actuators to measure different physical parameters. Often indirect measurements and estimation of variables, based off sensor data, are used in the closed loop control of the engine and its subsystems. Thus, sensor fusion techniques and virtual instrumentation have become more significant to the control strategy. With the large volumes of data produced by the increasing number of sensors, the analysis of sensor networks has become more important. Understanding the value of the information they contain and how well it is extracted through uncertainty quantification will also become essential to the development of control architecture. This paper proposes a methodology to quantify how valuable a sensor is relative to the architecture. By modelling the sensor network as a Bayesian network, Bayesian analysis and control metrics were used to assess the value of the sensor. This was demonstrated on charge mass flow estimation in the inlet manifold. Four control architectures modelled using a Bayesian network were compared: balanced sensors, redundant sensors, synergistic sensors…
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