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Full-Scale Burn Test of a 2014 Sport Utility Vehicle

Colwell Consulting LLC-Benjamin Knox, Michael Papageorge, Jeff D. Colwell
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-0925
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
Results from a full-scale vehicle burn test involving a sport utility vehicle illustrated how fire spread throughout the vehicle, how temperature distributions changed over time, and how arcing-through-char is not guaranteed in a vehicle fire. The fire was initiated on a grommet on the rear portion of the passenger’s side of the engine compartment. Once the temperature near the origin reached approximately 600°C, the rate of fire spread rapidly increased. Over the next 3.5 minutes, the fire spread to all locations within the engine compartment and both front tires. Although the vehicle’s electrical system was energized for the duration of the fire, with the battery located at the rear of the passenger compartment, no evidence of beaded copper wires was observed on any of the conductors located in the engine compartment.
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Simulation of Conductive and Radiated Emission for Off and On-Board Radio Receivers According to CISPR 12 and 25.

Altair Engineering-Aseim Elfrgani, C. J. Reddy
Altair ProductDesign, Inc-Dipen Das
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-1371
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
Two of the most commonly exercised standards by Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) automotive engineers are CISPR 12 and CISPR 25. Both are developed and established by EMC regulatory committee named as CISPR (International Special Committee on Radio Interference) which is a part of International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). While CISPR 12 is imposed as a regulation to ensure uninterrupted communication for off-board radio receivers, CISPR 25 is often applied to ensure the quality of services of on-board receivers. Performing these tests becomes challenging until the vehicle is prototyped which may prolong the production time in case of failure or need for modification. However, conducting these tests in simulation environment can offer more time and cost-efficient way of analyzing the electromagnetic environment of automotive vehicles. In this paper, a computational approach is proposed in order to predict electromagnetic disturbance from on-board electronics/electrical systems using 3D computational electromagnetic (CEM) tool; Altair Feko. The presented study elaborates on radiated and conductive emission simulations performed for both vehicular and component/module level EMI testing according to CISPR 12 and 25. Simulation setup…
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Internal Model Control During Mode Transition Subject To Time Delay For Hybrid Electric Vehicles

Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ-Dongxiao Miao, Li Chen, Ping YI
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-0961
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
With the rapid development of series-parallel hybrid electric vehicles (SPHEVs), mode transition from pure electrical drive to hybrid drive has attracted considerable attention. The presence of time delay due to response capacity of actuators and signal transmission of communication may lead to decrease of speed tracking accuracy, even instable dynamics. Consequently, drivability of the SPHEV is unacceptable, and durability of the components is reduced. So far, plenty of control strategies have been proposed for the mode transition, however, no previous research has been reported to deal with the time delay during the mode transition. In this paper, a dynamic model with time delay of hybrid electric system is established. Next, a mode transition time-delay controller is proposed by combining a two degree of freedom internal model controller (2DOF-IMC) and a Smith compensator. Considering the control plant has three inputs (the engine output torque, clutch transmitted torque and motor output torque) and two outputs (the engine speed and motor speed), the generalized inverse matrix is used to solve the non-square control problem for the inverse matrix…
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Evaluation of High Resistance Connection in Automotive Application

General Motors-Manoj Modi, Brad Galgoci
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-0926
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
A high resistance / poor connection in an electric circuit has been reported to cause a temperature increase exceeding normal operational range at the connection. Some studies have reported glowing condition at the poor connection. The 2017 edition of NFPA 921 states that the wattage of well-developed heating connections in wiring can be up to 30-40 W with currents of 15-20 A. Heating connections of lower wattage have also been noted at currents as low as about 1 A. The NFPA 921 data appears to be referenced from studies on residential electrical systems. This study is to determine the temperature and power loss in a typical automotive electrical connection with a simulated high resistance under different load conditions
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Performance Specification for Cable-to-Terminal Electrical Crimps

USCAR
  • Ground Vehicle Standard
  • USCAR21
  • Current
To be published on 2020-01-31 by SAE International in United States
This specification defines basic test methods and requirements for solder-less crimped connections.
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WIRE, ELECTRICAL, POLYTETRAFLUOROETHYLENE/POLYIMIDE INSULATED, NORMAL WEIGHT, SILVER COATED, HIGH STRENGTH OR ULTRA HIGH STRENGTH COPPER, ALLOY, 200 °C, 600 VOLTS ROHS

AE-8D Wire and Cable Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AS22759/89D
  • Current
Published 2019-12-18 by SAE International in United States
No Abstract Available.
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
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WIRE, ELECTRICAL, POLYTETRAFLUOROETHYLENE/POLYIMIDE INSULATED, SMOOTH SURFACE, LIGHT WEIGHT, TIN-COATED COPPER CONDUCTOR, 150 °C, 600 VOLTS ROHS

AE-8D Wire and Cable Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AS22759/180A
  • Current
Published 2019-12-18 by SAE International in United States
No Abstract Available.
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
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new

WIRE, ELECTRICAL, POLYTETRAFLUOROETHYLENE/POLYMIDE INSULATED, SMOOTH SURFACE, LIGHT WEIGHT, SILVER-COATED HIGH STRENGTH OR ULTRA HIGH STRENGTH COPPER ALLOY, 200 °C, 600 VOLTS ROHS

AE-8D Wire and Cable Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AS22759/181A
  • Current
Published 2019-12-18 by SAE International in United States
No Abstract Available.
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
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Insulation Sleeving, Electrical, Heat Shrinkable, Polyvinyl Chloride, Semi Rigid, Crosslinked and Non-Crosslinked

AE-8D Wire and Cable Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AS23053/2A
  • Current
Published 2019-12-10 by SAE International in United States

Scope is unavailable.

Employing the Electrical Digital Twin to Mitigate Compliance Risk in Aerospace

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35688
Published 2019-12-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Delivering aircraft and various avionics compliant with the latest standards and regulations is increasingly difficult. Today, it’s not uncommon for a single commercial aircraft to comprise hundreds of line-replaceable units, hundreds of miles of wire, and unique configurations throughout all parts of a platform that must meet numerous certification requirements. With increasing electrical system content and complexity, a single change during the design, verification, or compliance process can put the entire program in jeopardy. With the rise in electrification and design complexity, aerospace original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) need to look for new methodologies to mitigate compliance risk.