The SAE MOBILUS platform will continue to be accessible and populated with high quality technical content during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. x

Your Selections

Adhesives and sealants
Show Only

Collections

File Formats

Content Types

Dates

Sectors

Topics

Authors

Publishers

Affiliations

Committees

Events

Magazine

   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Inverse Vibration Problem Used for the Characterization of the Damping Added by a Trim Foam on a Plate

CEVAA-Nicolas Merlette
CEVAA, LAUM-Meryem LE DEUNF
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-1580
To be published on 2020-06-03 by SAE International in United States
Many solutions exist to insure the NVH comfort of ground and air vehicles, like heavy mass (bitumen pads), viscoelastic treatments and absorbing foams. The trim foam is an alternative to heavy solutions. To know the potential of the foam, a study of its capacity to damp vibration is done. A system, composed by a suspended plate, with a foam on it, is characterized in different cases of contact at the foam-plate interface (glued or not) and with different types of foam. An experimental test facility is developed to identify the global damping of the structure: a laser vibrometer measures the displacement field of the foam-plate structure, an inverse method is used to determine the structural parameters. By changing the contact at the interface, it is possible to identify the contribution of the friction forces to the global damping of the structure. Another type of damping is the viscoelastic damping due to the intrinsic characteristics of the trim foam. With the help of FEA, it is possible to understand the influence of the damping effect. The…
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Experimental Study on Static and Fatigue Performance of Self-Piercing Riveted Joints and Adhesively Bonded Self-Piercing Riveted Joints Connecting Steel and Aluminum Components

FCA US LLC-Mingchao Guo, Ghassan El-Tawil
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-0177
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
This paper describes an experimental study on the performance of self-piercing riveted (SPR) joints and adhesively bonded SPR joints connecting steel and aluminum components under both quasi-static and cyclic loading. The joint configurations cover a wide range of material gauges, types and grades. Two and three thickness joints, with and without adhesive are also part of this study. Load versus deflection behavior, load carrying capacity, fatigue life and the failure modes for each type of joint are discussed. This study focuses on the influence of dissimilar material and adhesives to the joint performance. In addition, comparison of load carrying capacity and fatigue strength between SPR and resistance spot welded joints is also discussed.
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Development of a Novel Test System to Determine the Durability of RTV Gasket Material

FCA US LLC-Wensheng Zhang, Erich Gernand
Oakland University-Bingxu Wang, Gary Barber, Na Lyu
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-1069
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
This paper describes a laboratory-based test system and procedure for determining the durability of RTV sealant with fretting movement. A test machine is described in which shear and tensile stress-generating displacements at room temperature and temperature of 100°C are produced to load an RTV seal. The test system utilizes an air pressurized hollow cylinder with a cap sealed by RTV sealant on a reciprocating test rig. An external air leakage monitoring system detects the health of the tested RTV seal. When air leakage occurs, the seal is determined to have failed. RTV sealant used in the test was fully cured at room temperature and then aged with engine oil. In the experiments, a total of 6 displacements were used to generate cycle/amplitude graphs for both shear and tensile modes. Failures were determined to be caused by the loss of adhesion in tensile mode, and by crack nucleation due to the special step design in shear mode. The results have validated the feasibility of the proposed test system and procedure, which can be used for durability…
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Estimation of the Mechanism to Suppress Water Degradation of 1K Heat-Curing Epoxy Adhesive with High Durability

Aisin Chemical Co., Ltd.-Kazumasa Sakaguchi
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-0227
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
In recent years, structural adhesives have been used to improve the rigidity, shock resistance, etc. of joints, and the requirements for these characteristics are expected to expand further. However, heat, loads, water, etc. can become deterioration factors for adhesives, and the consequent loss of strength is known to occur. In this study, the author has focused on water absorption deterioration, considered as one of the largest deterioration factors for adhesives, and has succeeded in providing high-water resistance to a one-component(1K) heat-curing epoxy adhesive through the addition of appropriate additives. This adhesive exhibited no hydrolysis during the 14-day 70 °C, 100% RH deterioration acceleration test, and strength retention and cohesive failure rates of 100% have been confirmed. In this study, the factors that provide high durability to the adhesive are identified, and the mechanism of how these factors suppress water absorption deterioration has been estimated.
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Hybrid Forming - A Novel Manufacturing Technique for Metal-LFT Structural Parts

University of Siegen-Daniel Heidrich, Tobias Kloska, Xiangfan Fang
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-0235
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
Hybrid structural parts combining aluminum or steel sheets with long glass fiber reinforced thermoplastics (LFT) offer a great opportunity to reduce component weight for automotive applications. But due to high manufacturing cost, metal-LFT hybrid components are still scarcely used in automotive large-scale production. Thus in this work a novel cost- and time efficient manufacturing process for simultaneous metal sheet forming and compression molding of long fiber reinforced thermoplastics to manufacture automotive lightweight components is presented. In this manufacturing process, which is referred to as “Hybrid forming”, a fiber reinforced thermoplastic melt is used as a forming medium in the manner of well-known hydroforming processes. After forming the metal sheet by polymer melt in combination with the rigid die, the melt solidifies and forms a local reinforcement structure in the hybrid component. Since the metal sheet is pre-coated with a bonding agent prior to the forming process, a firmly bonded connection between metal and LFT can be achieved.For proof of concept a longitudinal control arm in a multi-link rear axle is chosen. By utilizing Hybrid forming…
new

Eco-profiling of Bio-epoxies via Life Cycle Assessment

SAE International Journal of Sustainable Transportation, Energy, Environment, & Policy

Clemson University, USA-Adhimoolam Bakthavachalam Kousaalya, Rakesh Krishnamoorthy Iyer, Srikanth Pilla
  • Journal Article
  • 13-01-01-0003
Published 2020-03-25 by SAE International in United States
Epoxies, synthesized from bisphenol-A (BPA) and epichlorohydrin (ECH), are predominantly used as coatings, adhesives, and matrix material in fiber-reinforced composites for body-in-white (BiW) applications in the automotive sector. However, given the production of conventional epoxies from nonrenewable petroleum resource and toxicity of BPA, several initiatives have been undertaken by researchers to synthesize alternative epoxies from various bio-sources that are free of BPA and exhibit similar mechanical performance. As a result, such bio-sourced epoxies are almost immediately termed as “ecofriendly,” despite the lack of comprehensive evaluation of their ecological performance that takes into account enhanced natural resource usage and associated impacts accompanying such epoxies. Hence, this work aims at addressing this gap by evaluating the environmental impacts of such bio-sourced epoxies via cradle-to-gate life cycle assessment (LCA) to determine the genuine credentials of their ecofriendliness. Epoxies synthesized from three different bio-sources - namely, bark extractives, lignin, and triglyceride - were chosen so to evaluate their ecological performance. ReCiPe midpoint and endpoint methods were used to evaluate these epoxies in accordance with ISO 14040 and ISO 14044…
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.
new

Aerospace Standard Test Methods for Aerospace Sealants Two-Component Synthetic Rubber Compounds

AMS G9 Aerospace Sealing Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AS5127/1D
  • Current
Published 2020-03-18 by SAE International in United States
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) describes test methods to determine the application and performance properties of two-component sealing compounds. It shall be used in conjunction with AS5127 and the applicable material specification. When modifications to these test methods are called out in material specifications, the material specification shall take precedence.
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.
new

Fluid, Jet Reference

AMS G9 Aerospace Sealing Committee
  • Aerospace Material Specification
  • AMS2629F
  • Current
Published 2020-03-12 by SAE International in United States
This specification covers a mixture of liquid hydrocarbons and soluble additives.
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.
new

Effects of Helical Carbon Nanotubes on Mechanical Performance of Laminated Composites and Bonded Joints

Wichita State University-Ramanan Sritharan, Davood Askari
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-0029
Published 2020-03-10 by SAE International in United States
Most composite assemblies and structures generally fail due to weak interlaminar properties and poor performance of their bonded joints that are assembled together with an adhesive layer. Adhesive failure and cohesive failure are among the most commonly observed failure modes in composite bonded joint assemblies. These failure modes occur due to the lack of reinforcement within the adhesive layer in transverse direction. In addition, the laminated composites fail due to the same reason that is the lack of reinforcement through the thickness direction between the laminae. The overall performance of any composite structures and assemblies largely depends on the interlaminar properties and the performance of its bonded joints. Various techniques and processes were developed in recent years to improve mechanical performance of the composite structures and assemblies, one of which includes the use of nanoscale reinforcements in between the laminae and within the adhesive layer. However, most prior research has been focused on use of straight carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and other nanomaterials in particle forms. The goal of this research was to improve the properties…
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available

Biodegradable Alternative for Adhesives

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-36006
Published 2020-02-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

An alternative adhesive has been developed that adapts to suit a wide range of industrial and medical applications that benefit from sticky materials. The key ingredient is carbon dioxide. About 20–40 percent of the biodegradable adhesive, which has the consistency of honey or molasses, is composed of CO2. It adhesive takes a year or less to fully break down in the environment.