Your Selections

Additive manufacturing
Show Only

Collections

File Formats

Content Types

Dates

Sectors

Topics

Authors

Publishers

Affiliations

Committees

Events

Magazine

Series

   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.
new

Wire Fed Laser Directed Energy Deposition Additive Manufacturing Process (L-DED-wire)

AMS AM Additive Manufacturing Metals
  • Aerospace Material Specification
  • AMS7010
  • Current
Published 2020-01-14 by SAE International in United States

This specification establishes process controls for the repeatable production of preforms using the wire fed laser directed energy deposition (L-DED-wire) process for additive manufacturing. Preforms are intended to be used to manufacture aerospace parts, but usage is not limited to such applications.

   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.
new

Characterization of Titanium Alloy (Ti6Al4V) Obtained by Additive Manufacturing

Centro de Tecnologia da Informação Renato Archer-Jorge Vicente Lopes Da Silva
Universidade Federal do ABC-Reyolando Lopes Rebello Da Fonseca Brasil, Rafael Celeghini Santiago
  • Technical Paper
  • 2019-36-0112
Published 2020-01-13 by SAE International in United States
The development of additive manufacturing processes (3D printing), applied to metal alloys, is in line with the industry's current need for optimization, cost and development time reduction, allowing the construction of representative prototypes with equivalent materials / mechanical characteristics and customized end products, such as prostheses and brake system calipers, for which Ti6Al4V alloy has wide application due to biocompatibility and resistance. In addition, the need for more resilient materials is becoming ever greater at same time that failures need to be avoided. The occurrence of failures in structural components generates consumer dissatisfaction, which can result in serious accidents and the use of numerical tools during the project contributes to its prediction. For this, it is necessary to know the structural characteristics of the material resulting from the printing processes to guarantee robust designs. Currently there are few available information regarding mechanical and micro-structural proprieties on titanium alloy Ti6Al4V obtained by 3D printing process compared with other process. Thus, through physical tests of specimens according to ASTM A370-08a and microstructural evaluations, became possible the alloy…
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.
new

Effect of Shot Peening Conditions on the Fatigue Life of Additively Manufactured A357.0 Parts

SAE International Journal of Materials and Manufacturing

Università degli Studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Italy-Andrea Gatto, Antonella Sola
Università degli Studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Italy Maserati S.p.A., Italy-Emanuele Tognoli
  • Journal Article
  • 05-13-02-0009
Published 2020-01-09 by SAE International in United States
Fatigue performance can be a critical attribute for the production of structural parts or components via additive manufacturing (AM). In comparison to the static tensile behavior of AM components, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the fatigue performance. The growing market demand for AM implies the need for more accurate fatigue investigations to account for dynamically loaded applications. A357.0 parts are processed by laser-based powder bed fusion (L-PBF) in order to evaluate the effect of surface finishing on fatigue behavior. The specimens are surface finished by shot peening using ϕ = 0.2 and ϕ = 0.4 mm steel particles and ϕ = 0.21-0.3 mm zirconia-based ceramic particles. The investigation proves that all the considered post-processing surface treatments increase the fatigue resistance of as-built parts, but the effect of peening with ϕ = 0.4 mm steel particles or with ceramic particles is more pronounced than that of peening with ϕ = 0.2 mm steel particles, although this treatment has the same Almen A value as the ceramic one. The surface morphology and the crack surface…
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.
new

Unsettled Technology Domains in Aerospace Additive Manufacturing Concerning Safety, Airworthiness, and Certification

Muelaner Engineering, Ltd.-Jody Muelaner
  • Research Report
  • EPR2019008
Published 2019-12-23 by SAE International in United States
Additive manufacturing (AM) is currently being used to produce many certified aerospace components. However, significant advantages of AM are not exploited due to unresolved issues associated with process control, feedstock materials, surface finish, inspection, and cost. Components subject to fatigue must undergo surface finish improvements to enable inspection. This adds cost and limits the use of topology optimization. Continued development of process models is also required to enable optimization and understand the potential for defects in thin-walled and slender sections. Costs are high for powder-fed processes due to material costs, machine costs, and low deposition rates. Costs for wire-fed processes are high due to the extensive postprocess machining required. In addition, these processes are limited to low-complexity features. Incremental improvements in all of these areas are being made, but a step change could potentially be achieved by hybrid processes, which use wire feedstock to deposit the bulk of the part and powder for fine detail.NOTE: SAE EDGE™ Research Reports are intended to identify and illuminate key issues in emerging, but still unsettled, technologies of interest…
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.
new

Unsettled Technology Domains in Robotics for Automation in Aerospace Manufacturing

Muelaner Engineering, Ltd.-Jody Muelaner
  • Research Report
  • EPR2019010
Published 2019-12-20 by SAE International in United States
Cost reduction and increasing production rates are driving automation of aerospace manufacturing. Articulated serial robots may replace bespoke gantry automation or human operations. Improved accuracy is key to enabling operations such as machining, additive manufacturing (AM), composite fabrication, drilling, automated program development, and inspection. New accuracy standards are needed to enable process-relevant comparisons between robotic systems.Accuracy can be improved through calibration of kinematic and joint stiffness parameters, joint output encoders, adaptive control that compensates for thermal expansion, and feedforward control that compensates for hysteresis and external loads. The impact of datuming could also be significantly reduced through modeling and optimization. Highly dynamic end effectors compensate high-frequency disturbances using inertial sensors and reaction masses. Global measurement feedback is a high-accuracy turnkey solution, but it is costly and has limited capability to compensate dynamic errors. Local measurement feedback is a mature, affordable, and highly accurate technology where the robot is required to position or align relative to some local feature. Locally clamped machine tools are an alternative approach that can utilize the flexibility of industrial robots while…
Annotation ability available

Streamlining Post-Processing in Additive Manufacturing

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35666
Published 2019-12-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Undoubtedly there are many benefits associated with the use of additive manufacturing (AM) as a production technology. On a pan-industrial basis, manufacturers exploit the fact that through the use of AM they can not only build complex parts, in one piece, which were previously impossible, but they can also build stronger, lighter-weight parts, reduce material consumption, and benefit from assembly component consolidation across a range of applications. These advantages have all been well documented during the last 10-20 years as AM has emerged as a truly disruptive technology for prototyping and production, and are invariably seen as being enabled by the additive hardware that builds the parts. In reality, however, this is a partial picture, particularly for serial production applications of AM. AM hardware systems are actually just one part – albeit a vital part – of an extensive ecosystem of technologies that enable AM, both pre- and post-build.

   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Streamlining Post-Processing in Additive Manufacturing

Aerospace & Defense Technology: December 2019

  • Magazine Article
  • 19AERP12_04
Published 2019-12-01 by SAE International in United States

Undoubtedly there are many benefits associated with the use of additive manufacturing (AM) as a production technology. On a pan-industrial basis, manufacturers exploit the fact that through the use of AM they can not only build complex parts, in one piece, which were previously impossible, but they can also build stronger, lighter-weight parts, reduce material consumption, and benefit from assembly component consolidation across a range of applications. These advantages have all been well documented during the last 10-20 years as AM has emerged as a truly disruptive technology for prototyping and production, and are invariably seen as being enabled by the additive hardware that builds the parts. In reality, however, this is a partial picture, particularly for serial production applications of AM. AM hardware systems are actually just one part - albeit a vital part - of an extensive ecosystem of technologies that enable AM, both pre- and post-build.

Annotation ability available

New 3D Printing Technique for Biomaterials

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35626
Published 2019-12-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

A new technique could be used to print soft biomaterials that could be used to repair defects in the body. The method offers an alternative to existing techniques that use gels that have been minced to form a slurry bath into which the printed material is injected. Called Freeform Reversible Embedding of Suspended Hydrogels (FRESH), these materials offer many advantages, but friction within the gel medium can distort the printing.

   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Light-Weighting of Additive Manufactured Automotive Fixtures through Topology Optimization Techniques

General Motors Technical Center India-Abhijith Naik, T Sujan, Suraj Desai, Saravanakumar Shanmugam
  • Technical Paper
  • 2019-28-2544
Published 2019-11-21 by SAE International in United States
Rapidly enhancing engineering techniques to manufacture components in quick turnaround time have gained importance in recent times. Manufacturing strategies like Additive Manufacturing (AM) are a key enabler for achieving them. Unlike traditional manufacturing techniques like injection molding, casting etc.; AM unites advanced materials, machines, and software which will be critical for the fourth industrial revolution known as Industry 4.0. Successful application of AM involves a specific combination and understanding of these three key elements. In this paper the AM approach used is Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM). Since material costs contribute to 60% of the overall FDM costs, it becomes a necessity to optimize the parts. This paper reports the case studies of 3D-printed Automotive Fixtures which utilize computational methods (CAE), topology optimization and FDM constrains (build directions) to manufacture the part. These methodologies were used to validate the current operating conditions, optimize the design, increase the stiffness of the original part and reduce the material costs. The newly optimized designs were verified successfully passing the Finite Element Analysis tests. The components have been printed and…
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Precipitation Hardenable Steel Alloy, Corrosion and Heat-Resistant Powder for Additive Manufacturing 16.0Cr - 4.0Ni - 4.0Cu - 0.30Nb

AMS AM Additive Manufacturing Metals
  • Aerospace Material Specification
  • AMS7012
  • Current
Published 2019-11-14 by SAE International in United States
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant steel alloy in the form of pre-alloyed powder.
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available