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Yanik, Anthony J.
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The E-M-F Company: The Story of Automotive Pioneers Barney Everitt, William Metzger, and Walter Flanders

Anthony J. Yanik
  • Book
  • R-286
Published 2001-08-01 by SAE International in United States
This book tells the remarkable story of these three automotive giants and the impact they had on the American car industry. Everitt was instrumental in forming the extensive body building industry that characterized Detroit prior to World War II. Metzger established the first automotive dealership in Detroit, if not the country, and served as head of sales of Cadillac during its formative years. Flanders, a genius with machines, masterminded the tools of production for the first Model T.
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The Birth of Chrysler Corporation and Its Engineering Legacy

Anthony J. Yanik, Carl Breer
  • Book
  • R-144
Published 1995-02-01 by SAE International in United States
Through words and pictures from Breer's own photography collection, The Birth of Chrysler Corporation and Its Engineering Legacy offers a nostalgic look at the industry's early days and provides us with insight into the men that were instrumental to Chrysler Corporation's engineering success. After reading this account of the stellar careers of Zeder, Skelton, and Breer, and the many engineering accomplishments for which they were responsible, automotive engineers will appreciate the great legacy given to them by these men. A book of interest to all automotive historians, design engineers, car enthusiasts, and anyone wishing to learn more about the automobile industry in its early years. Chapters cover: Carl Breer: The Early Years With Zeder and Skelton at Studebaker, 1916-1918 We Create Chrysler Corporation Reminiscences of Early Product Developments at Chrysler Corporation Birth of the Airflow Car Railroad Ride Research Along Airflow Principles The Chrysler Engineering Team and the War Effort Death of Walter Chrysler and a New Regime. Reviews
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The Automobile: Unwanted Technology - The Later Years Part I: Cars and Crises 1960-1990 Part II: The Dawning of Automotive Electronics

General Motors Corp.-Anthony J. Yanik
Published 1992-02-01 by SAE International in United States
Several factors have influenced the size and design of domestic passenger cars over the past 30 years. Of most significance has been the influx of imported cars, initially from Europe, later from Japan. Interspersed within the fabric of this influx have been two energy crises and several recessions, and the onset of safety, emission, and energy regulations. These factors have led to various responses by domestic manufacturers as indicated by the types of products and vehicle systems that they have introduced during this period. This paper chronicles both the events as well as the responses.
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The Automobile - Unwanted Technology - Part I-The Early Years

Chrysler Motors-Michael J. Kollins, Jeffrey I. Godshall
Ford Motor Co.-James K. Wagner
Published 1990-02-01 by SAE International in United States
When the raucous, fragile, imperfect American automobile made its debut there was much concern and consternation.The costs, complexities, choices and confusion in the marketplace resulted in an ultra conservative attitude towards untested innovation or new technology.Its frailties made the American car no match for its European counterparts and despite an early movement in the direction of a small inexpensive sturdy car to handle atrocious roads, most early manufacturers opted to produce expensive more profitable large models.However, many innovative minds worked to solve the early problems and imperfections of the automobile and although their efforts were not initially approved or accepted, they provided the framework or perhaps the inspiration for later development. The long developmental history of innovation clearly illustrates that many novel concepts must wait for manufacturing methods, materials, money management, and motorist acceptance before they become practical realities.
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New Technology Considerations for Mature Drivers

General Motors Environmental Activities Staff-Anthony J. Yanik
Published 1990-02-01 by SAE International in United States
It is doubtful whether a vehicle designed specifically as an “old person's car” could ever achieve success inasmuch as the culture in which we exist assigns only the most negative of attributes to such characterizations. Nevertheless, there are numerous vehicle technologies that are emerging or under longer range development that may be of special benefit to the elderly. This paper will discuss these technologies, and explain how they might help offset some of the declines in vision and cognition that mature drivers experience through aging.Concern over the mature driver and his or her capabilities to drive safely have received increased emphasis within the private and public sectors over the past several years. While such a concern is appropriate, it would not exist today if automobile manufacturers over the years had failed to develop the various power assist technologies that have enabled adults to continue driving well into advanced age. Without the help of such equipment as automatic transmissions, power steering and brakes, and electronic seat adjusters and window lifts, people over 65, especially women, probably…
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Factors to Consider When Designing Vehicles for Older Drivers

General Motors Corp.-Anthony J. Yanik
  • Technical Paper
  • 1989-14-0014
Published 1989-10-16 by Human Factors and Ergonomics Society in United States
As the Baby Boom generation gradually moves into its later years, that movement will become a Senior Boom that will have a dramatic effect upon the design of products entering the marketplace. To respond to this market, engineers and designers will require a good understanding and awareness of the changes that take place in vision and cognition as a result of the aging process, and how these changes affect the interaction of older adults with their vehicle systems such as controls and displays, mirrors, entry and exit, and lighting. This paper is an attempt to bring that understanding to the designer and engineer, as based upon current research.
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The Automobile-the Unwanted Child

Chrysler Motors-Jeffrey I. Godshall, Michael J. Kollins
Ford Motor Co.-James K. Wagner
Published 1989-02-01 by SAE International in United States
In the relatively short span of 100 years, the American automobile has traveled a somewhat rocky and circuitous road from unwanted child and wealthy toy to the greatest symbol of personal freedom known to man.The imperfect American horseless carriage was introduced at a time when paved roads were virtually nonexistence, fuel was not readily available, and authorities sought to restrict its progress.Yet the automotive pioneers prevailed and literally changed the face of the country as well as its economy and technology.The changes, however, evoked criticism, regulation, and challenges which have endured.
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Designing Controls for Older Drivers

General Motors Environmental Activities Staff-Anthony J. Yanik
  • Technical Paper
  • 896012
Published 1989-01-01 by National Highway Traffic Safety Administration in United States
Until recent years, the design of primary and secondary controls for automobiles followed a fairly established pattern. Driver expectations regarding their size, shape, and location were relatively high. With the proliferation of electronics within the passenger car, especially involving secondary controls (radio, heater, etc.), such expectations no longer hold true. Yet older drivers, encumbered as they are with gradually deteriorating visual capability, and an increasing difficulty with tasks involving excessive use of short term memory and divided attention, rely upon control expectations to reduce eye-off-the-road time. For this reason, they are more apt to select a "traditional" display in product reviews. This paper is an attempt to bring an understanding to the visual and cognitive changes that drivers experience once they pass the age of 50, and to suggest guiding principles for the design of primary and secondary controls that might accommodate these changes.
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Vehicle Design Considerations For Older Drivers

Anthony J. Yanik
Published 1988-09-01 by SAE International in United States
During the next half century, the older driver population will increase dramatically as the Baby Boom becomes a Senior Boom of similar proportions. Therefore a proper understanding and awareness of the changes that take place in our vision and cognition through aging, can be useful to engineers designing automobile systems for a more mature market. How these changes brought about by aging affect our interaction with such vehicle systems as controls and displays, mirrors, head-lighting, seating, and entry and exit is the subject of the following discussion. Recommendations also are made, based upon the current literature, for modifying these vehicle systems to meet the needs of older drivers.
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How Aging Affects the Relationship Between the Driver and the Road Environment

General Motors Environmental Activities Staff-Anthony J. Yanik
Published 1987-02-01 by SAE International in United States
This paper describes the effects of aging upon a driver's capability to perceive and react to conventional road warning and guidance systems, as well as other factors intended to assist traffic movement and safety. It first examines the effects of aging on driver visual functions, then upon cognition or the speed at which older drivers process the visual information derived from signs and warning systems. Its purpose is to create a sensitivity within the highway community for the difficulties that drivers may experience with such systems after they pass middle age.
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