Your Selections

TEAE31
Show Only

Collections

File Formats

Content Types

Dates

Sectors

Topics

Publishers

Committees

Committee Codes

Procedure for the Analysis and Evaluation of Gaseous Emissions from Aircraft Engines

E31Aircraft Engine Gas and Particulate Emissions Measurement
  • Aerospace Standard
  • ARP1533B
  • Historical
Published 2013-01-03 by SAE International in United States
SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice ARP1533 is a procedure for the analysis and evaluation of the measured composition of the exhaust gas from aircraft engines. Measurements of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, total hydrocarbon, and the oxides of nitrogen are used to deduce emission indices, fuel-air ratio, combustion efficiency, and exhaust gas thermodynamic properties. The emission indices (EI) are the parameters of critical interest to the engine developers and the atmospheric emissions regulatory agencies because they relate engine performance to environmental impact. While this procedure is intended to guide the analysis and evaluation of the emissions from aircraft gas turbine engines, the methodology may be applied to the analysis of the exhaust products of any hydrocarbon/air combustor. Some successful applications include: Aircraft engine combustor development rig tests (aviation kerosene fueled) Stationary source combustor development rig tests (natural gas and diesel fueled) Afterburning military engine tests (aviation jet fueled) Internal combustion aircraft engine diagnostics (AVGAS fueled) Each application may be characterized by very different measured emissions levels (parts per million versus percent by volume) but this common approach…
Datasets icon
Annotation icon

Procedure for the Continuous Sampling and Measurement of Gaseous Emissions from Aircraft Turbine Engines

E31Aircraft Engine Gas and Particulate Emissions Measurement
  • Aerospace Standard
  • ARP1256C
  • Historical
Published 2006-11-01 by SAE International in United States
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) describes the continuous sampling and analysis of gaseous emissions from aircraft gas turbine engines. The measured gas species include carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), total hydrocarbons (CHα where “α” is the hydrogen to carbon ratio of the fuel) and water vapor (H2O). This ARP excludes engine operating procedures and test modes, and is not intended for in-flight testing, nor does it apply to engines operating in the afterburning mode. It is recognized that there will probably be major advances in the gas analysis measurement technology. It is not the intent of this ARP to exclude other analysis techniques, but to form the basis of the minimum amount of conventional instruments (those in common industry usage over the last fifteen years) required for the analysis of aircraft engine exhaust. It is the responsibility of the analyst to demonstrate the alternative measurement technology has comparable (or better) performance, than the techniques described in this ARP. The measurement of other exhaust gas species is beyond…
Datasets icon
Annotation icon

Nonvolatile Exhaust Particle Measurement Techniques

E31Aircraft Engine Gas and Particulate Emissions Measurement
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AIR5892A
  • Historical
Published 2004-07-22 by SAE International in United States
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) addresses procedures applicable to quantifying the emission of nonvolatile particulate matter at the exit plane of aircraft gas turbine engines. While both volatile and nonvolatile particulate matter (PM) are present in aircraft gas turbine exhaust, the methods used to measure nonvolatile particles are farther advanced and are addressed here. Existing PM measurement regulations employ the SAE Smoke Number measurement (Reference 2.1.1), a stained filter technique used in evaluating visible emissions. The environmental and human health issues associated with submicronic PM emissions require more detailed measurement of the mass, size, and quantity of these particle emissions. Responding to regulatory agency requests, this AIR describes measurement techniques that are well developed and could be applied to the measurement of aircraft engine particulate matter. The techniques discussed here are considered relevant for measuring particle parameters identified with environmental and health concerns. The discussion that follows is based on research made while developing measurement techniques and in scientific and engineering experiments regarding PM emissions. The techniques are not yet used in routine aircraft…
Datasets icon
Annotation icon

Procedure for the Analysis and Evaluation of Gaseous Emissions from Aircraft Engines

E31Aircraft Engine Gas and Particulate Emissions Measurement
  • Aerospace Standard
  • ARP1533A
  • Historical
Published 2004-07-20 by SAE International in United States
Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) 1533 is a procedure for the analysis and evaluation of the measured composition of the exhaust gas from aircraft engines. Measurements of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, total hydrocarbon, and the oxides of nitrogen are used to deduce emission indices, fuel-air ratio, combustion efficiency, and exhaust gas thermodynamic properties. The emission indices (EI) are the parameters of critical interest to the engine developers and the atmospheric emissions regulatory agencies because they relate engine performance to environmental impact. While this procedure is intended to guide the analysis and evaluation of the emissions from aircraft gas turbine engines, the methodology may be applied to the analysis of the exhaust products of any hydrocarbon / air combustor. Some successful applications include: Aircraft engine combustor development rig tests (aviation kerosene fueled) Stationary source combustor development rig tests (natural gas and diesel fueled) Afterburning military engine tests (JP fueled) Internal combustion aircraft engine diagnostics (AVGAS fueled) Each application may be characterized by very different measured emissions levels (parts per million versus percent by volume) but this common…
Datasets icon
Annotation icon

Nonvolatile Exhaust Particle Measurement Techniques

E31Aircraft Engine Gas and Particulate Emissions Measurement
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AIR5892
  • Historical
Published 2004-05-13 by SAE International in United States

This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) addresses procedures applicable to quantifying the emission of nonvolatile particulate matter at the exit plane of aircraft gas turbine engines. While both volatile and nonvolatile particulate matter (PM) are present in aircraft gas turbine exhaust, the methods used to measure nonvolatile particles are farther advanced and are addressed here. Existing PM measurement regulations employ the SAE Smoke Number measurement (Reference 2.1.1), a stained filter technique used in evaluating visible emissions. The environmental and human health issues associated with submicronic PM emissions require more detailed measurement of the mass, size, and quantity of these particle emissions. Responding to regulatory agency requests, this AIR describes measurement techniques that are well developed and could be applied to the measurement of aircraft engine particulate matter. The techniques discussed here are considered relevant for measuring particle parameters identified with environmental and health concerns. The discussion that follows is based on research made while developing measurement techniques and in scientific and engineering experiments regarding PM emissions. The techniques are not yet used in routine aircraft engine certification. Future use in regulatory testing is likely to involve further refinements in methodology and application. It is planned that these refinements will be included in the subsequent publication of an Aerospace Recommended Practice. The distinction between nonvolatile and volatile particle types is a critical task in the measurement of particles in aircraft engine exhaust. Appendix A, SAE E-31 Position Paper on Particle Matter Measurements, provides additional technical bases for the scope of this AIR. The measurement methods for volatile condensed particles in turbine exhaust will be covered in a subsequent report. Observations to date show that volatile particles occur mainly at diameters less than 10 nanometers (<10 nm) but may dominate in particle number density (PND).

Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine Exhaust Smoke Measurement

E31Aircraft Engine Gas and Particulate Emissions Measurement
  • Aerospace Standard
  • ARP1179C
  • Historical
Published 1997-10-01 by SAE International in United States
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) standardizes test equipment and procedures for the measurement of smoke emission from aircraft gas turbine engines. The procedures included are for determining and reporting the amount of smoke emission. Tests have indicated that the practically achievable precision of the smoke number is within ±3 when the system is properly used as outlined herein. This procedure is not intended for in-flight testing, nor does it apply to engines operating in the afterburning mode.
Datasets icon
Annotation icon

GAS TURBINE EMISSION PROBE FACTORS

E31Aircraft Engine Gas and Particulate Emissions Measurement
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AIR4068A
  • Historical
Published 1996-09-01 by SAE International in United States
This report describes the concept and data analysis of the probe factor (pf) scheme. Conclusions are drawn and recommendations made for action to further the requirements for improved methods and procedures in emissions sampling technology.
Datasets icon
Annotation icon

Procedure for the Calculation of Gaseous Emissions From Aircraft Turbine Engines (Supersedes By Air1533)

E31Aircraft Engine Gas and Particulate Emissions Measurement
  • Aerospace Standard
  • ARP1533
  • Historical
Published 1996-01-01 by SAE International in United States
This is a procedure for calculation of gaseous emissions data, specifically, emission index, fuel-air ratio, and combustion efficiency for aircraft turbine engines based on the measurement of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, total hydrocarbons, and the oxides of nitrogen. Reference 2.1.1 gives procedures for the measurement of gaseous emissions from aircraft turbine engines. This document includes instructions for the adjustment of the measured concentrations of the constituents of the exhaust for: a. the humidity of the inlet air, b. the carbon dioxide content of the inlet air, c. the interference of carbon dioxide and water on the measured concentrations of carbon monoxide and the oxides of nitrogen, d. the interference of oxygen on the measured concentration of carbon dioxide, e. the efficiency of the converter for changing other oxides of nitrogen to nitric oxide, and f. the basis of measurement (semidry or wet).

Procedure for Sampling and Measurement of Engine Generated Contaminants in Bleed Air Supplies From Aircraft Engines Under Normal Operating Conditions

E31Aircraft Engine Gas and Particulate Emissions Measurement
  • Aerospace Standard
  • ARP4418
  • Historical
Published 1995-08-01 by SAE International in United States
No Abstract Available.
Annotation icon

AIRCRAFT GAS TURBINE ENGINE EXHAUST SMOKE MEASUREMENT

E31Aircraft Engine Gas and Particulate Emissions Measurement
  • Aerospace Standard
  • ARP1179B
  • Historical
Published 1991-04-19 by SAE International in United States
This Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) standardizes test equipment and procedures for the measurement of smoke emission from aircraft gas turbine engines. The procedures included are for determining and reporting the amount of smoke emission. Tests have indicated that the practically achieveable precision of the smoke number is within ±3 when the system is properly used as outlined herein. This procedure is not intended for in-flight testing, nor does it apply to engines operating in the afterburning mode.
Datasets icon
Annotation icon