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In-Vehicle Test Results for Advanced Propulsion and Vehicle System Controls Using Connected and Automated Vehicle Information

Journal Article
2021-01-0430
ISSN: 2641-9637, e-ISSN: 2641-9645
Published April 06, 2021 by SAE International in United States
In-Vehicle Test Results for Advanced Propulsion and Vehicle System Controls Using Connected and Automated Vehicle Information
Sector:
Citation: Rajakumar Deshpande, S., Gupta, S., Kibalama, D., Pivaro, N. et al., "In-Vehicle Test Results for Advanced Propulsion and Vehicle System Controls Using Connected and Automated Vehicle Information," SAE Int. J. Adv. & Curr. Prac. in Mobility 3(6):2915-2930, 2021, https://doi.org/10.4271/2021-01-0430.
Language: English

Abstract:

A key enabler to maximizing the benefits from advanced powertrain technologies is to adopt a systems integration approach and develop optimized controls that consider the propulsion system and vehicle as a whole. This approach becomes essential when incorporating Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) and communication technologies, which can provide information on future driving conditions. This may enable the powertrain control system to further improve the vehicle performance and energy efficiency, shifting from an instantaneous optimization of energy consumption to a predictive and “look-ahead” optimization. Benefits from this approach can be realized at all levels of electrification, from conventional combustion engines to hybrid propulsion systems and full electric vehicles, and at all levels of vehicle automation.
This paper documents an extensive simulation and experimental campaign that provides a systematic quantification of fuel economy and mobility benefits resulting from leveraging Vehicle-to-Everything (V2X) connectivity, longitudinal (Level 1+) automation, and advanced cylinder deactivation to improve the propulsion system and vehicle efficiency. A Vehicle Dynamics and Powertrain (VD&PT) optimization framework, developed jointly by The Ohio State University and BorgWarner, utilizes advanced route information available from the navigation system and GPS, and Vehicle-to-Infrastructure (V2I) communication when available to minimize the cumulative fuel consumption over a driver-selected route.
To assess the benefits of these technologies in real-world conditions, a Monte Carlo simulation framework was developed to quantify the impact of Signal Phase and Timing (SPaT), variability in traffic conditions, and behavior of different drivers on the fuel consumption and vehicle travel time. Further, verification through in-vehicle testing was conducted by reconstructing a subset of these scenarios on a proving ground.