Reducing Greenhouse Emissions from Light-Duty Vehicles: Supply-Chain and Cost-Effectiveness Analyses Suggest a Near-Term Role for Hybrids

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Authors Abstract
Content
Policy makers generally favor all-electric vehicles over hybrid-electric vehicles because of greater unit effectiveness in reducing carbon emissions. Since both systems use lithium-ion batteries, global demand for batteries is projected to grow 10-fold by 2030. If any step in the global battery supply-chain experiences bottlenecks, shortages can occur. We use a novel cost-effectiveness metric, carbon reduction per unit of battery capacity consumed, to rank emissions reductions accomplished by, alternatively, eight plug-in hybrid-electric vehicles, 75 hybrid-electric vehicles, and 230 mild hybrid-electric vehicles, which have the same total battery capacity as one all-electric vehicle. Our main finding, although counterintuitive, is that, with limited battery supplies, larger reductions in carbon emissions can be accomplished by hybrids than by all-electric vehicles. Insofar as carbon emission reduction is the policy goal, policies need to be reconsidered to ensure that they are not tilted too far in favor of all-electric vehicles relative to hybrids.
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DOI
https://doi.org/10.4271/13-05-02-0011
Pages
18
Citation
Graham, J., and Wade, W., "Reducing Greenhouse Emissions from Light-Duty Vehicles: Supply-Chain and Cost-Effectiveness Analyses Suggest a Near-Term Role for Hybrids,"https://doi.org/10.4271/13-05-02-0011.
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Publisher
Published
Oct 30, 2023
Product Code
13-05-02-0011
Content Type
Journal Article
Language
English