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User-centered Human-Machine-Interaction (HMI) Design for Automotive Systems

Johnson Controls GmbH-Gert-Dieter Tuzar
  • Technical Paper
  • 2008-21-0004
Published 2008-10-20 by Convergence Transportation Electronics Association in United States
Multimedia systems, GPS navigation, entertainment, and communication (infotainment) have become increasingly popular in today's cars. On one hand, these systems offer a desirable amount of comfort and convenience. On the other, the representation of information on displays and navigation through these virtual worlds leads to increased driver distraction within a constantly changing environment that could be dangerous to road safety. For this reason, Human-Machine-Interaction (HMI) Design needs to be addressed.This paper will present a problem-driven, user-centered cognitive approach. It also shows how HMI Design transfers research findings into efficient product development. There is a very complex relationship between the user, the interface and the traffic environment. Psychological factors, the driving situation, and interface properties affect drivers' behavior. Design parameters for interaction concepts will be shown. As interaction design concepts represent designers' hypotheses, it will also be shown how these HMI concepts are tested. Within this phase users add their perspective to measure subjective and objective interaction efficiency.The reader will experience a combination of primary research, secondary research, and product examples that render a holistic HMI…
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Direct Conversion of Heat to Electricity

Massachusetts Institute of Technology-Thomas A. Keim, Ivan Čelanović
  • Technical Paper
  • 2008-21-0049
Published 2008-10-20 by Convergence Transportation Electronics Association in United States
The prime candidate for direct conversion from heat to electricity has historically been thermoelectric energy conversion. More recently, advances in thermophotovoltaic systems render them potentially interesting. Neither class of systems is used in automobiles to any significant extent today, and neither class of systems is poised on the brink of a large-scale adoption. In this paper, the characteristics of these types of energy conversion are discussed, with special emphasis on their utility in automobiles.
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Improved Fuel Consumption through Steering Assist with Power on Demand

ThyssenKrupp Presta-Michael Wellenzohn
  • Technical Paper
  • 2008-21-0046
Published 2008-10-20 by Convergence Transportation Electronics Association in United States
The paper compares hydraulic, electro-hydraulic, and electric power steering in terms of power consumption and possible innovative features:Conventional hydraulic assisted power steering:Good steering performance. High energy consumption because hydraulic pump is constantly driven by combustion engine. Innovative steering functions are not possible with this technology.Electro-hydraulic power steering:Good steering performance. Reduced energy consumption because hydraulic pump is driven by continuously operating electric motor. Rpm of motor is depending on requested steering assist: partial power on demand. Innovative steering functions are not possible with this technology.Electric power steering:Minimal energy consumption due to power on demand: electric motor runs only when steering assist is required by driver. Enabling technology for advanced vehicle control functions.Besides the obvious advantages in power consumption this paper will also address the challenges regarding system performance which need to be considered before bringing the EPAS on the road, such as steering feel, safety according to SIL3, power density, requirement for new features, and last not least cost.
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The Connected Vehicle Proving Center: A Collaborative, Architecture-Neutral Development Environment

Connected Vehicle Trade Association-Scott J. McCormick
  • Technical Paper
  • 2008-21-0008
Published 2008-10-20 by Convergence Transportation Electronics Association in United States
This paper will present one method and architecture-neutral means for accomplishing a collaborative development environment that would virtually link the needed hard facilities such as roads and test tracks, utilize embedded and nomadic devices, provide the software development tools and support multiple communication protocols. The proposed capability would be able to be linked to any other facility globally, thereby allowing public and private entities an ability to both clearly evaluate what is created elsewhere, improve or demonstrate their developments, and provide a means of advancing vehicle communications research.
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Lean, Light and Quiet: Advances in Automotive Energy Efficiency through Biomimetic Design

PAX Scientific, Inc.-Peter S. Fiske, Jayden Harman
PaxFan LLC-Kim Shekar
  • Technical Paper
  • 2008-21-0028
Published 2008-10-20 by Convergence Transportation Electronics Association in United States
Nature has been designing self-propelled vehicles (animals and plants) for the last 600 million years and has arrived at a variety of designs that are highly energy efficient, elegant in construction and quiet in operation. Biomimicry is the process of utilizing designs and processes found in nature to inspire advances in man-made systems. New technologies have emerged that enable a biomimetic approach to the design not only of automobile bodies but also automotive sub-systems and components. This paper highlights several examples of biomimetic design that could improve the performance of today's automobiles.
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Economically Driven Embedded Controls Development Tool Choices Supported by ASAM Standards

ETAS Inc.-Tim Foster
  • Technical Paper
  • 2008-21-0020
Published 2008-10-20 by Convergence Transportation Electronics Association in United States
Recent economic conditions have pushed both automotive Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) and Tier1 suppliers to reevaluate the way that they are spending not only their money, but also their precious engineering resources. This reevaluation has caused a focus on core engineering activities and a push to reuse capital equipment, such as development tools. This reevaluation has also caused users of embedded controls development tools to actively seek out commercially available development tool solutions when such solutions are available and even to push commercial tool vendors to develop solutions when they don't yet exist.
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To Test the Need and the Need to Test -Testing the Smart Controller Network for the Chassis of Tomorrow -

ZF Friedrichshafen AG-Harald Deiss, Horst Krimmel, Oliver Maschmann
  • Technical Paper
  • 2008-21-0041
Published 2008-10-20 by Convergence Transportation Electronics Association in United States
Hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) simulation has become a key technique for the validation of today's automotive electronics. OEMs and suppliers are investing heavily in hardware-in-the-loop equipment and tests. Typically, suppliers test the electronic control unit (ECU) as a component. The OEM on the other hand tests the ECU more from a network point of view. This paper describes the main differences between component and network HIL tests.ZF Friedrichshafen AG has been using HIL test benches since 1985. In order to ensure high quality, especially with respect to network aspects, we not only test the ECUs as components but as part of the network. For that purpose, and to stay on the leading edge of HIL technology, ZF has set up a new test bench for networked HIL testing. The control network contains the driveline and chassis domain. The devices tested are, e.g., automatic transmission, torque on demand transfer case, torque vectoring axle drive, electric power steering, active steering system, active stabilizers, variable dampers, levelling control as well as a brake control system (ESP). This article presents the…
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Telematics – The Essential Cornerstone of Global Vehicle and Traffic Safety

Continental-Peter E. Rieth, James Remfrey
  • Technical Paper
  • 2008-21-0034
Published 2008-10-20 by Convergence Transportation Electronics Association in United States
Networking of active and passive safety is the fundamental basis for comprehensive vehicle safety. Situation-relevant information relating to driver reactions, vehicle behavior and traffic environment are fed into a crash probability calculator, which continually assesses the current crash risk and intervenes when necessary with appropriate measures to avoid a crash and reduce potential injuries. This provides effective protection not only for vehicle occupants but also for other, vulnerable road users. As this functionality up till now only relates to the vehicle itself, the next logical step is enhancement leading to the ultimate goal in safety performance, telematics. The integration of this embedded, in-vehicle wireless communication system allows Car-to-Car (C2C) and Car-to-Infrastructure (C2I) functionality for, e.g. hazard warning. This is an integral element of the cascaded ContiGuard® protection measures. This paper describes the current status in the functional potential attained by networking active and passive safety systems, the integration of surrounding sensors and introduces the next ultimate step towards global vehicle and traffic safety - telematics.
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Combining Automotive System and Function Models to Support Code Generation and Early System Verification

dSPACE GmbH-Dirk Stichling, Oliver Niggemann, Joachim Stroop, Dirk Fleischer
  • Technical Paper
  • 2008-21-0042
Published 2008-10-20 by Convergence Transportation Electronics Association in United States
Function models have a well-established position in automotive software development. Formal system models, on the other hand, are rare. This article describes the various aspects of function and system models, focusing mainly on AUTOSAR-compatible models. It also depicts the challenges for future overall models that combine the function models and the system model, and the resulting benefits, such as early system verification via PC-based simulations.
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Emerging US Location Based Wireless Services, Infrastructure, Vehicle Connectivity, Vehicle Architecture and Challenges:

Panasonic Automotive Systems Company of America-Hakan Kostepen, Jerry Rathje
  • Technical Paper
  • 2008-21-0007
Published 2008-10-20 by Convergence Transportation Electronics Association in United States
This paper will focus on emerging US Location Based Wireless in car applications and services. Closing expectations gap between consumer electronics with automotive electronics are increasingly becoming a center of all location based “in car” services. Enabled by the evolving wireless infrastructure, vehicle connectivity is expanding from traditional US Telematics services to “life style and content” driven applications and services. Shifting business models are changing the landscape to satisfy evolving location based content user needs. This paper will touch on US infrastructure challenges and enabling technologies for the ultimate user “in car” experience along with the HMI challenges for location based “content centric infotainment related connectivity & applications”.
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