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LES Modeling Study on Cycle-to-Cycle Variations in a DISI Engine

Honda R&D Co., Ltd.-Hiroyoshi Taniguchi
RWTH Aachen University-Tobias Falkenstein, Marco Davidovic, Antonio Attili, Mathis Bode, Hongchao Chu, Heinz Pitsch
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-0242
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
The reduction of cycle-to-cycle variations (CCV) is a prerequisite for the development and control of spark-ignition engines with increased efficiency and reduced engine-out emissions. To this end, Large-Eddy Simulations can improve the understanding of stochastic in-cylinder phenomena during the engine design process, if the employed modeling approach is sufficiently accurate. To assess the predictive capabilities of the turbulent combustion model used in this work, an engine-relevant Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) dataset of premixed flame propagation in homogeneous isotropic turbulence is considered for a-posteriori investigations. LES predictions using the Flame Front / Progress Variable Equation Model are demonstrated to be in good agreement with the DNS results. Integral flame propagation results are shown to be unaffected by the choice of two eddy viscosity models, although some differences in the SFS velocity distributions near the flame front exist between the Dynamic Smagorinsky Model (DSM) and the Coherent Structure Model (CSM). The validated combustion model has been applied to investigate CCV in a direct-injected spark ignition (DISI) engine under fuel-lean conditions with respect to a stoichiometric baseline operating…
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Temperature Prediction of Actual Contact Portion of the Metal Belt CVT

Honda R&D Co., Ltd.-Kenji Matsumoto, Hideharu Koga, Hiroyoshi Taniguchi
Tokyo City University-Yuji Mihara
Published 2018-04-03 by SAE International in United States
In a previous study by the authors, austenite (γ phase) formed on the topmost of pulleys after long term operation of continuously variable transmission (CVT) [1]. In general, martensite arising from heat treatment forms on the surface of pulleys and gears. Therefore, the sliding surface has a body-centered cubic (BCC) metal structure, and transformation into and existence of austenite (γ phase) is difficult unless there is a thermal history exceeding the eutectoid point. For the verification of that possibility, it was crucial to obtain temperature variation on the sliding surface. The major problem for such measurements was rotation of parts inside an operating CVT. In this study, uniquely developed measurement system enabled non-contact temperature measurement near the contact portion. Results were substituted to heat conduction equation to predict the temperature at the exact contact portion.
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Effects of Cavitation and Hydraulic Flip in 3-Hole GDI Injectors

SAE International Journal of Fuels and Lubricants

Argonne National Laboratory-Jin Wang
Honda R&D Co., Ltd.-Hiroyoshi Taniguchi, Kei Murayama, Toshiyuki Arima
  • Journal Article
  • 2017-01-0848
Published 2017-03-28 by SAE International in United States
The performance of Gasoline Direct Injection (GDI) engines is governed by multiple physical processes such as the internal nozzle flow and the mixing of the liquid stream with the gaseous ambient environment. A detailed knowledge of these processes even for complex injectors is very important for improving the design and performance of combustion engines all the way to pollutant formation and emissions. However, many processes are still not completely understood, which is partly caused by their restricted experimental accessibility. Thus, high-fidelity simulations can be helpful to obtain further understanding of GDI injectors. In this work, advanced simulation and experimental methods are combined in order to study the spray characteristics of two different 3-hole GDI injectors. First, a simulation approach for computing cavitation and hydraulic flip is presented, which appropriately combines simulations with different levels of abstraction allowing for predictive GDI injector simulations on currently available supercomputers. Next, general resolution requirements and various initial conditions are discussed. Especially the effect of initial bubbles inside the sac on the cavitation formation process is investigated by performing a…
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Large-Eddy Simulation Study on Unsteady Effects in a Statistically Stationary SI Engine Port Flow

Honda R&D Co Ltd-Toshiyuki Arima, Hiroyoshi Taniguchi
RWTH Aachen University-Tobias Falkenstein, Mathis Bode, Heinz Pitsch
Published 2015-04-14 by SAE International in United States
Although spark-ignited engines have a considerable development history, the relevant flow physics and geometry design implications are still not fully understood. One reason is the lack of experimental and numerical methods with sufficiently high resolution or capabilities of capturing stochastic phenomena which could be used as part of the development cycle. More recently, Large-Eddy simulation (LES) has been identified as a promising technique to establish a better understanding of in-cylinder flow variations. However, simulations of engine configurations are challenging due to resolution as well as modeling requirements and computational cost for these unsteady multi-physics problems. LES on full engine geometries can even be prohibitively expensive. For this reason, the size of the computational LES domain is here reduced to the region of physical interest and boundary conditions are obtained from a RANS simulation of the whole experimental flow domain. This approach required modifications to the compressible in- and outflow boundary conditions of the highly accurate structured LES framework. The extended method allows for oblique in- and outflows with an assumed velocity profile. Results for canonical…
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A New Euler/Lagrange Approach for Multiphase Simulations of a Multi-Hole GDI Injector

Honda R&D Co Ltd-Toshiyuki Arima, Hiroyoshi Taniguchi
RWTH Aachen University-Mathis Bode, Tobias Falkenstein, Heinz Pitsch
Published 2015-04-14 by SAE International in United States
Compared to conventional injection techniques, Gasoline Direct Injection (GDI) has a lot of advantages such as increased fuel efficiency, high power output and low emission levels, which can be more accurately controlled. Therefore, this technique is an important topic of today's injection system research.Although the operating conditions of GDI injectors are simpler from a numerical point of view because of smaller Reynolds and Weber numbers compared to Diesel injection systems, accurate simulations of the breakup in the vicinity of the nozzle are very challenging. Combined with the complications of experimental techniques that could be applied inside the nozzle and at the nozzle exit, this is the reason for the lack of understanding the primary breakup behavior of current GDI injectors.In this work, this issue is addressed by combining high-fidelity primary breakup simulations in the vicinity of the nozzle exit, which use the velocity profile at the nozzle exit as boundary condition, and common Lagrange spray simulations. In detail, these enhanced simulations of a 6-hole state-of-the-art GDI injector are compared with the results of fully-Lagrange spray…
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Study on the Cooling Method of Car Engine Pistons - Part 1, Basic Test for Achieving High Heat Transfer Coefficient

Honda R&D Co., Ltd.-Kenji Matsumoto, Hironori Harada, Hiroyoshi Taniguchi, Naoki Ito
Published 2015-04-14 by SAE International in United States
Car engine piston cooling is an important technology for improving the compression ratio and suppressing the deformation of pistons.It is well known that thermal conductivity improves dramatically through the use of heat pipes in computers and air conditioners.However, the heat pipes in general use have not been used for the cooling of engines because the flow of gas and liquid is disturbed by vibration and the thermal conductivity becomes excessively low.We therefore developed an original heat pipe and conducted an experiment to determine its heat transfer coefficient using a high-speed reciprocation testing apparatus.Although the test was based on a single heat pipe unit, we succeeded in improving the heat transfer coefficient during high-speed reciprocation by a factor of 1.6 compared to the heat transfer coefficient at standstill. This report describes the observed characteristics and the method of verification.In the future, we plan to examine the application of this approach to engine pistons.
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Development of CFD Model Using RCCE Method for Combustion Simulation

AdvanceSoft-Hitoshi Shiotani
Honda R&D-Hiroyoshi Taniguchi, Kohtaro Hashimoto
  • Technical Paper
  • 2012-08-0201
Published 2012-05-23 by Society of Automotive Engineers of Japan in Japan
A CFD model has been developed for the combustion simulation including a large detailed chemical kinetic mechanism. As substitute for the standard reduction model, the Rate-Controlled Constrained Equilibrium (RCCE) method made it possible to reduce high computational load which is due to the number of species and stiffness. In the present study, we report the computational efficiency and accuracy for the RCCE method incorporated in CFD simulation.
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Study on HCCI-SI Combustion Using Fuels Ethanol Containing

Honda R&D Co., Ltd.-Junichi Kamio, Tadashi Kurotani, Kohei Kuzuoka, Yasuyuki Kubo, Hiroyoshi Taniguchi, Kohtaro Hashimoto
Published 2007-10-29 by SAE International in United States
Bio-ethanol is one of the candidates for automotive alternative fuels. For reduction of carbon dioxide emissions, it is important to investigate its optimum combustion procedure. This study has explored effect of ethanol fuels on HCCI-SI hybrid combustion using dual fuel injection (DFI). Steady and transient characteristics of the HCCI-SI hybrid combustion were evaluated using a single cylinder engine and a four-cylinder engine equipped with two port injectors and a direct injector. The experimental results indicated that DFI has the potential for optimizing ignition timing of HCCI combustion and for suppressing knock in SI combustion under fixed compression ratio. The HCCI-SI hybrid combustion using DFI achieved increasing efficiency compared to conventional SI combustion. Feed-forward and feed-back control systems based on DFI enabled the transient operation including acceleration and deceleration during HCCI combustion, re-ignition of HCCI combustion after fuel cut mode, HCCI-SI-HCCI combustion transition, and suppression of knock in SI combustion.
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