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Seatbelt Use and Speeding among Crash-Involved versus Crash-Free Drivers and the Effects of Annual Driving Distance

Journal Article
09-11-01-0003
ISSN: 2327-5626, e-ISSN: 2327-5634
Published June 07, 2022 by SAE International in United States
Seatbelt Use and Speeding among Crash-Involved versus Crash-Free
                    Drivers and the Effects of Annual Driving Distance
Sector:
Citation: Shehab, M., "Seatbelt Use and Speeding among Crash-Involved versus Crash-Free Drivers and the Effects of Annual Driving Distance," SAE Int. J. Trans. Safety 11(1):2023, https://doi.org/10.4271/09-11-01-0003.
Language: English

Abstract:

Seatbelts have been acknowledged to be among the most effective vehicle implements that enhance vehicle occupants’ safety. Using seatbelts has been established as a highly effective means of reducing crash severity. On the contrary, speeding has been associated with an increased likelihood of crash occurrence and severity. Investigating factors associated with these two aspects of driving behavior is vital to improving road safety. This study examines the association of previous crash-involvements with seatbelt use and speeding habits by investigating whether crash-involved drivers were less likely to use seatbelts and more likely to adopt speeding habits. The study further explores the effects of annual driving distance on seatbelt use and speeding behaviors, and whether these effects are influenced by previous crash-involvements. The required data to meet the objectives of the study was obtained through self-report questionnaires distributed and completed online among a sample of personal vehicle drivers in Kuwait. Speeding and seatbelt use data were gathered for 1079 drivers representing different age groups, both genders, and a wide range of annual driving distances. Proportional odds models and analysis of variance (ANOVA)-I models were deployed to analyze the data. The results of this investigation showed that drivers previously involved in crashes were less likely to oblige to seatbelt use requirements and more likely to drive at high speeds. Additionally, the results showed that annual driving distance had greater effects on drivers’ speeding habits among crash-free drivers than among crash-involved drivers. Annual driving distance was not found to affect seatbelt use among crash-involved participants, while it had modest effects on seatbelt use among crash-free participants.