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Experimental Comparison of Biogas and Natural Gas as Vibration, Emission, and Performance in a Diesel Engine Converted to a Dual Fuel

  • Journal Article
  • 04-13-01-0004
  • ISSN: 1946-3952, e-ISSN: 1946-3960
Published January 27, 2020 by SAE International in United States
Experimental Comparison of Biogas and Natural Gas as Vibration, Emission, and Performance in a Diesel Engine Converted to a Dual Fuel
Sector:
Citation: Aytav, E., Koçar, G., and Teksan, A., "Experimental Comparison of Biogas and Natural Gas as Vibration, Emission, and Performance in a Diesel Engine Converted to a Dual Fuel," SAE Int. J. Fuels Lubr. 13(1):61-78, 2020.
Language: English

Abstract:

Biogas, natural gas, and their usage in the diesel engine will be important in the future. For this purpose, the effects of biogas on engine performance, emissions, and engine vibrations of the diesel engines with dual fuel system are investigated in comparison with natural gas. It has also been included in evaluating the deformation of the engine oil due to hydrogen sulfide combustion reactions. In this study, a constant speed, naturally aspirated, and direct injection of the diesel engine with volume of 2.5 liter has been converted into a dual fuel system that can be included in gas fuels. In order to determine engine performance, exhaust emissions, engine vibration, and noise, the tests were carried out at load stages of 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 kW and at a constant speed of 1500 rpm. The experiments were first performed in a mono operation condition of the conventional diesel fuel. Subsequently, tests were repeated under natural gas/diesel and biogas/diesel dual fuel operation conditions, respectively. As a result of the tests, it was observed that the vibration amount decreased and the noise emission was reduced by 3.5% in all stages where biogas was used as the main fuel. Depending on fuel or operation system change, no significant change was observed in cylinder block, cylinder heat, exhaust, and intake manifold temperature. The exhaust gas temperature is measured to be lower because of the carbon dioxide (CO2) content in the biogas. When approaching from the point view of engine emissions, it was determined that the carbon monoxide (CO) emission increased at all engine loads while a decrease of 50% in oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emission occurred.