Your Selections

Integrated modular avionics
Show Only

Collections

File Formats

Content Types

Dates

Sectors

Topics

Authors

Publishers

Affiliations

Committees

Events

Magazine

   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

The Research on Validation and Verification Method of Configuration Data for IMA Resources Allocation

CETC Avionics Co., Ltd.-Yan-xiao Li
UESTC; CETC Avionics Co., Ltd.-Yunsheng Wang
Published 2019-09-16 by SAE International in United States
Integrated Modular Avionics (IMA) system comprises IMA platform and hosted applications. The IMA platform provides the hosted applications with shared resources, e.g. computing, memory, communication, health monitoring resources. As a bridge between them, the IMA configuration data specifies how these shared resources are allocated to each hosted application. The IMA configuration data, which is different from real hardware and software code, should be validated and verified as an important portion of IMA system. After a brief introduction of IMA system, development processes, and general means of compliance for certification, this paper proposed an Architecture Analysis and Design Language (AADL) model of IMA configuration based on a case study of airborne datalink system. Based on the model, the IMA configuration data is abstracted and categorized into several types, with the correspondent means of compliance identified for each type. Furthermore, the associated roles and responsibilities are discussed for IMA configuration data validation and verification. The IMA configuration data specific means of compliance, the validation and verification processes, the roles and responsibilities, together form a method for validating…
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Design and Testing of Antiskid Brake Control Systems for Total Aircraft Compatibility

A-5A Wheels, Brakes and Skid Controls Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • ARP1070E
  • Current
Published 2019-07-22 by SAE International in United States
This document outlines the development process and makes recommendations for total antiskid/aircraft systems compatibility. These recommendations encompass all aircraft systems that may affect antiskid brake control and performance. It focuses on recommended practices specific to antiskid and its integration with the aircraft, as opposed to more generic practices recommended for all aircraft systems and components. It defers to the documents listed in Section 2 for generic aerospace best practices and requirements. The documents listed below are the major drivers in antiskid/aircraft integration: 1 ARP4754 2 ARP4761 3 RTCA DO-178 4 RTCA DO-254 5 RTCA DO-160 6 ARP490 7 ARP1383 8 ARP1598 In addition, it covers design and operational goals, general theory, and functions, which should be considered by the aircraft brake system engineer to attain the most effective skid control performance, as well as methods of determining and evaluating antiskid system performance. For definitions of terms used herein, see Section 7.
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

An Open Source Domain-Specific Avionics System Architecture Model for the Design Phase and Self-Organizing Avionics

SAE International Journal of Advances and Current Practices in Mobility

University of Stuttgart-Bjoern Annighoefer
  • Journal Article
  • 2019-01-1383
Published 2019-03-19 by SAE International in United States
State-of-the-art avionics systems are standardized, e.g. the computing system of the flying vehicle is composed of pre-defined and pre-qualified modules of a standardized avionics platform. Integrated Modular Avionics (IMA) is the most popular representative, but not the only one. Two challenges of standardized avionics platform are system design and configuration. Since the high numbers of functions, modules, and constraints for modern air vehicles, bringing up the optimal system architecture is a difficult job if carried out manually. The subsequent process of creating millions of configuration parameters is time consuming and error prone. Both issues are similar and are, in general, processable by algorithms. Algorithms proved to provide significant support for current system design issues and might be mandatory in future, when avionics become self-organizing and the design and configuration are derived by the platform itself. Automated design already proved its advantages and self-organizing platforms started to be in development. Having the right and rigid data format for this purpose is mandatory. A suitable data format must hold all requirements necessary to proof the validity of…
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Model-Based Systems Engineering Methodology for Implementing Networked Aircraft Control System on Integrated Modular Avionics – Environmental Control System Case Study

Bombardier Aerospace-Yann Le Masson
Concordia University Montreal-Prince George Mathew, Susan Liscouet-Hanke
Published 2018-10-30 by SAE International in United States
Integrated modular avionics (IMA) architectures host multiple federated avionics applications on a single platform and provide benefits in terms of size, weight, and power, which, however, leads to increased complexity, especially during the development process. To cope efficiently with the high level of complexity, a novel, structured development methodology is required. This paper presents a model-based systems engineering (MBSE) development approach for the so-called “distributed integrated modular architecture” (DIMA). The proposed methodology adapts the open-source Capella tool, based on the Architecture Analysis & Design Integrated Approach (ARCADIA) methodology, to implement a complete design cycle, starting with requirements captured from the aircraft level to streamline the development, culminating in the integration of an avionics application into an ARINC 653 platform. This paper shows how to address the variability of technology implementations at the aircraft and system levels and how the specification artifacts are efficiently managed and traced from the aircraft to the system to the item level to implement the SAE ARP4754A guidelines. The effectiveness of the methodology is presented via a case study of the…
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Anomaly Based Intrusion Detection for an Avionic Embedded System

LAAS-CNRS, Université de Toulouse, CNRS-Mohamed Kaâniche
LAAS-CNRS, Université de Toulouse, CNRS, INSA-Eric Alata, Vincent Nicomette
Published 2018-10-30 by SAE International in United States
This paper firstly describes the challenges raised by the introduction of Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS) in avionic systems. In particular, we discuss some specific characteristics of such systems and the advantages and limitations of signature-based and anomaly-based techniques in an avionics context. Based on this analysis, a framework is proposed to integrate a Host-based Intrusion Detection System (HIDS) in the general Integrated Modular Avionics (IMA) development process, which fits avionic systems constraints. The proposed HIDS architecture is composed of three modules: anomaly detection, attack confirmation, and alert sending. To demonstrate the efficiency of this HIDS, an attack injection module has also been developed. The overall approach is implemented on an IMA platform running a cockpit display function, to be representative of embedded avionic systems.
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

ADVANCED FLIGHT MANAGEMENT COMPUTER SYSTEM

Airlines Electronic Engineering Committee
  • ARINC Standard
  • ARINC702A-5
  • Current
Published 2018-08-28 by SAE Industry Technologies Consortia in United States

The Advanced FMCS provides expanded functions beyond that defined in ARINC 702 to support the anticipated requirements for operation in the CNS/ATM operating environment. GNSS and RNP based navigation, air-to-ground data link for communications and surveillance, and the associated crew interface control/display definitions are included.

In-Flight Real-Time Avionics Adaptation

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-32734
Published 2018-08-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Avionics is a very restricting domain for obvious safety reasons. Along with miniaturization comes the idea of integration. More functionality on one spot requires a good management of privacy and congestion on shared platforms. This is why determinism is one of the keywords of avionics works. This led to protocols like ARINC653[1] assuring that multitask embedded programs respect a predictable policy applied by the operating system (OS). Another key protocol is ARINC664, which guarantees that multiple communicating systems efficiently share the network. These two protocols are pillars of the Integrated Modular Architecture (IMA) concept[2].

   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

General Requirements for WDM Backbone Networks

AS-3 Fiber Optics and Applied Photonics Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AIR6005
  • Current
Published 2018-01-23 by SAE International in United States
This document (AIR6005) provides the framework for the specifications of a WDM OBN within the SAE AS5659 WDM LAN Specification document family, in particular, the Transparent Optical Backbone Network Specification. This framework includes potential requirements, technical background, investigation and context to support the writing of SAE’s WDM LAN specifications documents. The SAE’s AS6005 WDM OBN document describes a transparent optical network which contains optical components and optical interfaces to perform optical transport, optical add/drop, optical amplification, optical routing, and optical switching functions. The conforming optical signal interfaces for the data plane of the WDM OBN are defined. The conforming signal interfaces for the control and management planes of this network are also defined. The control and management plane signals may be either electrical or optical. If successful, a WDM LAN standard is anticipated to include multiple variants that may get created either as separate documents (e.g. a multimode and single-mode specification) and additional documents may be needed to specify the components from which a WDM LAN and OBN will be built. The WDM OBN specification…
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Guide to Civil Aircraft Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC)

AE-4 Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • ARP60493
  • Current
Published 2017-10-25 by SAE International in United States
This guide provides detailed information, guidance, and methods for demonstrating electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) on civil aircraft. This guide addresses aircraft EMC compliance for safety and functional performance of installed electrical and electronic systems. The EMC guidance considers conducted and radiated electromagnetic emissions and transients generated by the installed electrical and electronic systems which may affect other installed electrical and electronic systems on the aircraft. Application of appropriate electrical and electronic equipment EMC requirements are discussed. Methods for aircraft EMC tests and analysis are described. This guide does not address aircraft compatibility with the internal electromagnetic environments of portable electronic devices (PED) or with the external electromagnetic environments, such as high-intensity radiated fields (HIRF), lightning, and precipitation static.
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Guidance for the Design and Installation of Fuel Quantity Indicating Systems

AE-5A Aerospace Fuel, Inerting and Lubrication Sys Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AIR5691A
  • Current
Published 2017-05-18 by SAE International in United States
This document is applicable to commercial and military aircraft fuel quantity indication systems. It is intended to give guidance for system design and installation. It describes key areas to be considered in the design of a modern fuel system, and builds upon experiences gained in the industry in the last 10 years.
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available