The SAE MOBILUS platform will continue to be accessible and populated with high quality technical content during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. x

Your Selections

Cables
Show Only

Collections

File Formats

Content Types

Dates

Sectors

Topics

Authors

Publishers

Affiliations

Committees

Events

Magazine

Series

   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Simulation of Conductive and Radiated Emission for Off and On-Board Radio Receivers According to CISPR 12 and 25.

Altair Engineering-Aseim Elfrgani, C. J. Reddy
Altair ProductDesign, Inc-Dipen Das
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-1371
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
Two of the most commonly exercised standards by Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) automotive engineers are CISPR 12 and CISPR 25. Both are developed and established by EMC regulatory committee named as CISPR (International Special Committee on Radio Interference) which is a part of International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). While CISPR 12 is imposed as a regulation to ensure uninterrupted communication for off-board radio receivers, CISPR 25 is often applied to ensure the quality of services of on-board receivers. Performing these tests becomes challenging until the vehicle is prototyped which may prolong the production time in case of failure or need for modification. However, conducting these tests in simulation environment can offer more time and cost-efficient way of analyzing the electromagnetic environment of automotive vehicles. In this paper, a computational approach is proposed in order to predict electromagnetic disturbance from on-board electronics/electrical systems using 3D computational electromagnetic (CEM) tool; Altair Feko. The presented study elaborates on radiated and conductive emission simulations performed for both vehicular and component/module level EMI testing according to CISPR 12 and 25. Simulation setup…
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Evaluation of High Resistance Connection in Automotive Application

General Motors LLC-Manoj Modi, Brad Galgoci
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-0926
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
Electrical connections have a normal operational temperature range. A high resistance, such as a poor connection, in an electrical circuit has been reported to cause a temperature increase exceeding normal operational range at the connection.This study measures the temperature increase in a typical automotive bolted battery cable connection with low to zero torque values and simulated high resistance under different load conditions. The torque is changed from maximum design value to 0 Nm and the temperature increase at the connection is measured. The high resistance connections, manually created by adjusting the contacts, are tested for several power loss values at the connection. The temperature rise under these conditions at the connection is measured and subsequently recorded.The maximum temperature increase at the bolted cable connection recorded at low torque values including 0 Nm torque compared to the maximum typical design value of 17 Nm is 10.5 °C. The maximum temperature increase for the high resistance bolted connection is a function of the power loss and the voltage drop at the connection.
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.
new

CONNECTOR ACCESSORIES, ELECTRICAL, TERMINATION, SHIELD SPLIT SUPPORT RING, COMPOSITE, NONENVIRONMENTAL, STRAIGHT, CATEGORY 7

AE-8C1 Connectors Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AS85049/93C
  • Current
Published 2020-03-19 by SAE International in United States
No Abstract Available.
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.
new

Cable Impedance Calculations Employed in Designing Aerospace Electrical Power Systems

Astronics AES-Jon Fifield
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-0037
Published 2020-03-10 by SAE International in United States
This paper presents design considerations in utilizing cable impedance calculations in the design of an aerospace electrical power system (EPS). Past wiring design guidelines featured a tabular set of data based on a single-point design reference. This results in a cable selection which adds unnecessary weight and under-utilized the wire’s performance ability when considering a vehicle’s design requirements. Present wiring design guidelines have lagged behind the growing movement to achieve an optimized wire selection. Understanding the shortfalls with past and present wiring design methods will improve future methods to comply with increasingly restrictive vehicle performance requirements. This paper will discuss two of the most important design requirements for future aerospace electrical power and distribution feeders, which are weight and thermal limits assigned to an EPS design.
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.
new

CONTACTS, ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR, SOCKET, CRIMP REMOVABLE, EXPANDED PERFORMANCE, SIZES 10, 12, 16, 20, 22 AND 23 (FOR MIL-DTL-38999 SERIES III CONNECTORS)

AE-8C1 Connectors Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AS39029/121
  • Current
Published 2020-03-02 by SAE International in United States
No Abstract Available.
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
new

The Benefits of Tungsten Cable

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-36242
Published 2020-03-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

There is no one-size-fits-all material when producing mechanical cable. The material chosen to produce wire rope can vary from one application to the next, because commonly, no two applications place the same demands on the stranded cable. Consider tungsten, for instance. Also known as Wolfram (W, atomic number 74), tungsten possesses the highest melting temperature of all metals. For this reason, this rare earth metal is commonly found in light bulb filaments, x-ray tubes, and arc-welding electrodes. Because of such unique mechanical properties, tungsten has become an integral component in the manufacturing of many of today’s cutting-edge medical devices, including surgical robots.

Open Access
new

Efficiency of an AC Conductive In-Road Charging System for Electric Vehicles-Analysis of Pilot Project Data

SAE International Journal of Alternative Powertrains

KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden-Mikael Hellgren, Nicholas Honeth
  • Journal Article
  • 08-09-01-0003
Published 2020-02-27 by SAE International in United States
This article describes the conductive in-road charging system as developed in the eRoadArlanda project, a pilot project for the development of in-road charging system for both heavy and light vehicles intended for application in motorways. The results of an analysis of measurements collected during the integration tests of this system are presented and discussed. The results focus on the end-to-end efficiency of the in-road charging system and aim to provide researchers in the field with a reference for this technology and configuration for use in the future development of such infrastructure. The analysis of the measurement data addresses losses in the low-voltage side of the AC conductive charging system as well as the vehicle-mounted isolated rectifier/converter connected to the vehicle DC system. An exploratory analysis of data collected over a 6-month testing period in varying weather conditions is used to provide insight into factors affecting the overall efficiency of the system. A discussion of the results includes the effects of cable dimensioning, rectifier performance and placement, and the use of salt for deicing.
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.
new

Coiled Electrical Cable - Truck and Bus

Truck and Bus Electrical Systems Committee
  • Ground Vehicle Standard
  • J2222_202002
  • Current
Published 2020-02-25 by SAE International in United States
This SAE Standard establishes the minimum performance and endurance requirements for coiled electrical cables used for hookup between trucks, trailers, and dollies for 12 VDC nominal applications. The component standards SAE J2394 (replaced SAE J1067) for cable and SAE J560 for connectors must be consulted to determine the complete performance and endurance requirements of the system. Related TMC Recommended Practices may be consulted for information associated with selection, installation, and inspection of these coiled electrical cables. This document is intended to set out requirements for the majority of conditions rather than for specialized applications or environments.
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.
new

Primary and Auxiliary Seven Conductor Electrical Connector for Truck-Trailer Jumper Cable

Truck and Bus Electrical Systems Committee
  • Ground Vehicle Standard
  • J560_202002
  • Current
Published 2020-02-25 by SAE International in United States
This SAE Standard provides the minimum requirements for primary and auxiliary jumper cable plug and receptacle for the truck-trailer and converter dolly jumper cable systems for 12 VDC nominal applications. It includes the test procedures, design, and performance requirements.
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.
new

Combination 11 Conductors and Two Pairs ECBS Cable

Truck and Bus Electrical Systems Committee
  • Ground Vehicle Standard
  • J2742_202002
  • Current
Published 2020-02-24 by SAE International in United States
This SAE standard establishes the minimum construction and performance requirements for a combination cable consisting of 11 conductors and two twisted pairs for use on trucks, trailers, and dollies for 12 VDC nominal applications in conjunction with SAE J2691 (15 pole connectors.) The cable includes both power and unjacketed SAE J1939-15 paired signal circuits along with dual ground wires to accommodate grounding requirements within the constraints of the SAE J2691 terminal capacity.
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available