Your Selections

Honeywell
Show Only

Collections

File Formats

Content Types

Dates

Sectors

Topics

Authors

Publishers

Affiliations

Events

   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

A Balanced Approach for Securing the OBD-II Port

SAE International Journal of Passenger Cars - Electronic and Electrical Systems

Honeywell-Tom R. Markham, Alex Chernoguzov
  • Journal Article
  • 2017-01-1662
Published 2017-03-28 by SAE International in United States
The On-Board Diagnostics II (OBD-II) port began as a means of extracting diagnostic information and supporting the right to repair. Self-driving vehicles and cellular dongles plugged into the OBD-II port were not anticipated. Researchers have shown that the cellular modem on an OBD-II dongle may be hacked, allowing the attacker to tamper with the vehicle brakes. ADAS, self-driving features and other vehicle functions may be vulnerable as well. The industry must balance the interests of multiple stakeholders including Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) who are required to provide OBD function, repair shops which have a legitimate need to access the OBD functions, dongle providers and drivers. OEMs need the ability to protect drivers and manage liability by limiting how a device or software application may modify the operation of a vehicle. This paper outlines a technical approach based upon cryptographic authentication and granular access control policy which addresses the needs of stakeholders. This allows the OEM to protect the security of the vehicle by carefully controlling the functions a particular device plugged into the OBD-II port…
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

A New Design of Low Cost V-band Joint

Honeywell-Henry Guo
Honeywell Garrett SA-Farid Ahdad
Published 2016-09-27 by SAE International in United States
In this work we have proposed an interesting clamping solution of V-band which has an important industrial impact by reducing the cost and assembly process as well compare to the traditional V-band. The design what we are focusing for is applied for all size of turbochargers which helps to connect the hot components such as manifold and turbine housing.The cost for V-band is mainly from T-bolt. It is made from special stainless steel which represents 50% of the total cost. In this work it is proposed a new V-band joint by changing bolt clamping status from tension to compression. From tension to compression we change the bolt material from high cost steel to low cost steel. The new total cost is reduced by 40%.The prototype is made and performed in static tests including anti-rotating torque test and salt spray test. The new joint meets the design requirements at static condition. Further work will focus on the dynamic qualification and at high temperature as well.
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Health Ready Components-Unlocking the Potential of IVHM

SAE International Journal of Materials and Manufacturing

Honeywell-Matthew A. Wuensch
Honeywell Aerospace-Tim Felke
  • Journal Article
  • 2016-01-0075
Published 2016-04-05 by SAE International in United States
Health Ready Components are essential to unlocking the potential of Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) as it relates to real-time diagnosis and prognosis in order to achieve lower maintenance costs, greater asset availability, reliability and safety. IVHM results in reduced maintenance costs by providing more accurate fault isolation and repair guidance. IVHM results in greater asset availability, reliability and safety by recommending preventative maintenance and by identifying anomalous behavior indicative of degraded functionality prior to detection of the fault by other detection mechanisms. The cost, complexity and effectiveness of the IVHM system design, deployment and support depend, to a great extent, on the degree to which components and subsystems provide the run-time data needed by IVHM and the design time semantic data to allow IVHM to interpret those messages.A great benefit can be achieved if a common approach is developed to assist suppliers in the development of “health-ready” components and systems and to simplify the process by which integrators use these capabilities to deploy IVHM applications. In this context, the term “health ready” refers to…
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Turbine Housing Boss Design in Turbocharger Application

Honeywell-Wei Guo, Henry Guo, Xiaowei Du, Daniel Wang
Published 2014-10-13 by SAE International in United States
Turbochargers are widely used to boost internal combustion engines for both on and off high way applications to meet emission and performance requirements. Due to the high operating temperature, turbochargers are subjected to hostile environment. Low vibration level is one of the key requirements while designing turbo for every application. An engine bracket is employed to support turbine housing to reduce total vibration level. Turbine housing in the turbocharger is commonly equipped with boss to accommodate the engine bracket supporting which eventually includes additional constraints in the turbocharger system. Additional constraints in the turbine housing can lead to adverse impact in the Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue (TMF) life of the housing component. Boss generally has critical influence to thermal stress distribution of the turbine housing. Bad design of boss location could bring severe thermal cracking and surface fracture that leads to loss of functionality and serious accident. Hence it is essential to design the boss appropriately in order to avoid housing cracks and loss of functionality. This paper first presents the current design with two bosses that…
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Incorporating Atmospheric Radiation Effects Analysis into the System Design Process

SAE International Journal of Aerospace

Honeywell-Laura Dominik
  • Journal Article
  • 2012-01-2131
Published 2012-10-22 by SAE International in United States
Natural atmospheric radiation effects have been recognized in recent years as key safety and reliability concerns for avionics systems. Atmospheric radiation may cause Single Event Effects (SEE) in electronics. The resulting Single Event Effects can cause various fault conditions, including hazardous misleading information and system effects in avionics equipment. As technology trends continue to achieve higher densities and lower voltages, semiconductor devices are becoming more susceptible to atmospheric radiation effects. To ensure a system meets all its safety and reliability requirements, SEE induced upsets and potential system failures need to be considered.The purpose of this paper is to describe a process to incorporate the SEE analysis into the development like-cycle. Background on the atmospheric radiation phenomenon and the resulting single event effects, including single event upset (SEU) and latch up conditions is provided. The approach to assess radiation effects susceptibility of components and the evaluation of SEE impacts on system functionality is described. The process includes a radiation analysis plan, parts assessment, radiation effects susceptibility evaluation, and a radiation effects report.
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Heat Exchanger Fouling Detection in Aircraft Environmental Control Systems

Honeywell-Kader Fellague
Honeywell Aerospace-Sunil Menon, Joseph Borghese, Ravindra Patankar
Published 2012-10-22 by SAE International in United States
The operating environment of aircraft causes accumulation and build-up of contamination on both the narrowest passages of the ECS (Environmental Control System) i.e: the heat exchangers. Accumulated contamination may lead to reduction of performance over time, and in some case to failures causing AOG (Aircraft on Ground), customer dissatisfaction and elevated repair costs. Airframers/airlines eschew fixed maintenance cleaning intervals because of the high cost of removing and cleaning these devices preferring instead to rely on on-condition maintenance. In addition, on-wing cleaning is t impractical because of installation constrains.Hence, it is desirable to have a contamination monitoring that could alert the maintenance crew in advance to prepare and minimize disruption when contamination levels exceed acceptable thresholds. Two methods are proposed to achieve this task, The effectiveness of these methods are demonstrated using analytical and computational tools.
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Dynamic Features and their Propagation in a Centrifugal Compressor Housing with Ported Shroud

Honeywell-Ashraf Mohamed
University of Cincinnati-Matthieu Gancedo, Erwann Guillou, Ephraim Gutmark
Published 2012-04-16 by SAE International in United States
The goal of the presented research is to study the effective operational range for a centrifugal vaneless diffuser turbocharger compressor with ported shroud typically used in diesel engines. A turbocharger bench facility was designed and tested in order to define the performances of the compressor and to better understand the occurrence of instabilities in the housing. Specific emphasis was given to the low mass flow rate region of the compressor performance characteristics where instabilities occur with fluctuations that can be significantly large in the case of surge. Static pressures and dynamic pressure fluctuations were measured at the inlet, the outlet, as well as at different positions around the volute and diffuser sections of the compressor in order to assess the development and propagation of flow instabilities.The dynamic signature of the flow was measured along with the elaboration of the compressor mapping. Hence, data covering the entire compressor map were collected and then analyzed with specific emphasis given at low mass flow rates where unstable phenomena, including stall and surge, occur. In this study, three regimes…
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Incorporation of Atmospheric Neutron Single Event Effects Analysis into a System Safety Assessment

SAE International Journal of Aerospace

Honeywell-Laura Dominik
Rockwell Collins, Inc.-Mike Dion
  • Journal Article
  • 2011-01-2497
Published 2011-10-18 by SAE International in United States
Atmospheric Neutron Single Event Effects (SEE) are widely known to cause failures in all electronic hardware, and cause proportionately more failures in avionics equipment due to the use altitude. In digital systems it is easy to show how SEE can contribute several orders of magnitude more faults than random (hard) failures. Unfortunately, current avionics Safety assessment methods do not require consideration of faults from SEE. AVSI SEE Task Group (Aerospace Vehicle Systems Institute Committee #72, on Mitigating Radiation Effects in Avionics) is currently coordinating development of an atmospheric Neutron Single Event Effects (SEE) Analysis method. This analysis method is a work in progress, in close collaboration with SAE S-18 and WG-63 Committees (Airplane Safety Assessment Committee). The intent is to include this method as part of current revisions to ARP4761 (Guidelines and Methods for Conducting the Safety Assessment Process on Civil Airborne Systems and Equipment).
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Advanced Electric Generators for Aerospace More Electric Architectures

Honeywell-Evgeni D. Ganev
Published 2010-11-02 by SAE International in United States
This paper discusses the problem of designing electric machines (EM) for advanced electric generators (AEG) used in aerospace more electric architecture (MEA) that would be applicable to aircraft, spacecraft, and military ground vehicles. The AEG's are analyzed using aspects of Six Sigma theory that relate to critical-to-quality (CTQ) subjects. Using this approach, weight, volume, reliability, efficiency, and cost (CTQs) are addressed to develop a balance among them, resulting in an optimized power generation system. The influence of the machine power conditioners and system considerations are also discussed. As a part of the machine evaluation process, speeds, bearings, complexities, rotor mechanical and thermal limitations, torque pulsations, currents, and power densities are also considered. A methodology for electric machine selection is demonstrated. Examples of high-speed, high-performance machine applications are shown. A system approach is used for overall EM selection and optimization. The presented material is a synopsis of the extensive engineering experience accumulated at Honeywell International. References 1 and 2 show that a similar approach has been applied to electric machines used in high-performance electric drives.
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Computational Fluid Dynamics Calculations of Turbocharger's Bearing Losses

SAE International Journal of Engines

Honeywell-Thierry Lamquin
Cnam-Michael Deligant, Pierre Podevin, Georges Descombes
  • Journal Article
  • 2010-01-1537
Published 2010-05-05 by SAE International in United States
Fuel consumption in internal combustion engines and their associated CO2 emissions have become one of the major issues facing car manufacturers everyday for various reasons: the Kyoto protocol, the upcoming European regulation concerning CO2 emissions requiring emissions of less than 130g CO2/km before 2012, and customer demand. One of the most efficient solutions to reduce fuel consumption is to downsize the engine and increase its specific power and torque by using turbochargers. The engine and the turbocharger have to be chosen carefully and be finely tuned. It is essential to understand and characterise the turbocharger's behaviour precisely and on its whole operating range, especially at low engine speeds. The characteristics at low speed are not provided by manufacturers of turbochargers because compressor maps cannot be achieve on usual test bench.Experiments conducted in our laboratory on a special test rig equipped with a high-precision torquemeter, demonstrate that compressor performances in this area cannot be deduced from adiabatic assumption. Nevertheless, our study suggests that as long as torque at the shaft end is measured and mechanical power…
Annotation ability available