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The study on the influence of factors on vehicle refueling emission test

China Automotive Technology and Research-Chunbei Dai, Taiyu Zhang, Chongzhi Zhong, Qiang Chen, Jiaxing Sun, Xiaoliang Wu, Tiefei Yu
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-1070
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
Two vehicles with ORVR system which are met with the US standard are studied. A comparative of refueling emissions test under different refueling rate and different refueling temperature are studied. The HC chemical analysis was carried out for the fuel gas emission from a sample car. The results show that with the increase of the refueling rates, the refueling emissions decline at first, and then gradually stabilize; with the increase of the refueling temperature, the results of refueling emissions show a gradual increase. Under the condition of 37 L / min refueling flow rate and 20 ℃ fuel temperature, 14 kinds of alkanes were emitted from the fuel, in which isobutane, isopentane and n-pentane were the highest emissive components, accounting for 57.66% of the total amount of VOCs.
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The Effects of Varying Penetration Rates of L4-L5 Autonomous Vehicles on Fuel Efficiency and Mobility of Traffic Networks

Ohio State University-Ozgenur Kavas-Torris, Mustafa Ridvan Cantas, Karina Meneses Cime, Bilin Aksun Guvenc, Levent Guvenc
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-0137
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
With the current drive of automotive and technology companies towards producing vehicles with higher levels of autonomy, it is inevitable that there will be an increasing number of SAE level L4-L5 autonomous vehicles (AVs) on roadways in the near future. The effect of this gradually increasing penetration of AVs on mobility, viewed as traffic congestion or traffic flow efficiency in this paper, and fuel efficiency improvement for the individual AV and for the whole road network with a mixed traffic of AVs and non-AVs is currently not well known. Microscopic traffic simulators that simulate realistic traffic flow are crucial in studying, understanding and evaluating the possible effects of having a higher number of autonomous vehicles (AVs) in traffic under realistic mixed traffic conditions including both autonomous and non-autonomous vehicles. In this paper, L4-L5 AVs with varying penetration rates in total traffic flow were simulated using the microscopic traffic simulator Vissim on urban, mixed and freeway roadways to study the effect of penetration rate on fuel consumption and efficiency of traffic flow. The roadways used in…
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Hydrogen Fuel Quality for Fuel Cell Vehicles

Fuel Cell Standards Committee
  • Ground Vehicle Standard
  • J2719_202003
  • Current
Published 2020-03-18 by SAE International in United States
This standard provides background information and a hydrogen fuel quality standard for commercial proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell vehicles. This report also provides background information on how this standard was developed by the Hydrogen Quality Task Force (HQTF) of the Interface Working Group (IWG) of the SAE Fuel Cell Standards Committee.
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Interior Decorative Clear Coating for Metal Surfaces

AMS G8 Aerospace Organic Coatings Committee
  • Aerospace Material Specification
  • AMS7200
  • Current
Published 2020-02-10 by SAE International in United States
This specification establishes requirements for an interior decorative clear coating for wear protection of metal substrates.
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A Fast, Simple Sampling Method for Characterizing Volatile Organic Compounds Emitted from Medical Devices

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35512
Published 2019-11-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

In 2018, an update on regulations for respiratory medical devices meant that volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from the devices must be addressed. ISO 10993-1 highlights the need for medical device engineers and manufacturers to characterize these chemicals, particularly plastics, because these often emit chemicals such as phthalates and polychlorinated biphenyls, which are thought to be a health concern.1,2

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Paint System, Fluorescent, Removable, for Aircraft Application

AMS G8 Aerospace Organic Coatings Committee
  • Aerospace Material Specification
  • AMSP21600B
  • Current
Published 2019-10-28 by SAE International in United States
This specification establishes the requirements for a high visibility, durable, exterior fluorescent coating system consisting of a pigmented fluorescent coating with a clear protective overcoat containing a weathering stabilizer. This coating system is capable of being removed without softening the permanent undercoats.
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Primer, Anodic Electrodeposition for Aircraft Applications

AMS G8 Aerospace Organic Coatings Committee
  • Aerospace Material Specification
  • AMS3144A
  • Current
Published 2019-10-17 by SAE International in United States
This specification establishes the requirements for a waterborne, corrosion inhibiting, chemical and solvent resistant, anodic electrodeposition epoxy primer capable of curing at 200 to 210 °F (93 to 99 °C).
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Modeling and Simulation of Refueling Emissions from Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles

SAE International Journal of Fuels and Lubricants

Jiangsu University, China-Shu Liu, Ren He
  • Journal Article
  • 04-12-03-0014
Published 2019-10-14 by SAE International in United States
Vehicular evaporative emissions are an important source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Moreover, the engines of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) may not start for a long time, causing the activated carbon canister to not purge well in-use and to become saturated with fuel vapor. Therefore, the problems of evaporative emissions and refueling emissions of PHEVs are still severe. The objectives of this article are to model and simulate the refueling emissions from PHEVs to shorten the design and development cycle. To achieve the goals, the release of refueling emissions is divided into two stages: the depressurization stage and the refueling stage. The mathematical model has been established by means of the ideal gas law and the gas mass transfer and diffusion law. Then, the numerical model is built and the volume of fluid (VOF) model was applied in the simulation. Moreover, the numerical model was validated by experiment on internal pressure increase of the fuel tank. The baseline case is conducted under the condition that the fuel dispensing rate is 50 L/min. Finally, different…
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Air Conditioning Systems for Subsonic Airplanes

AC-9 Aircraft Environmental Systems Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • ARP85G
  • Current
Published 2019-09-25 by SAE International in United States
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) contains guidelines and recommendations for subsonic airplane air conditioning systems and components, including requirements, design philosophy, testing, and ambient conditions. The airplane air conditioning system comprises that arrangement of equipment, controls, and indicators that supply and distribute air to the occupied compartments for ventilation, pressurization, and temperature and moisture control. The principal features of the system are: a A supply of outside air with independent control valve(s). b A means for heating. c A means for cooling (air or vapor cycle units and heat exchangers). d A means for removing excess moisture from the air supply. e A ventilation subsystem. f A temperature control subsystem. g A pressure control subsystem. Other system components for treating cabin air, such as filtration and humidification, are included, as are the ancillary functions of equipment cooling and cargo compartment conditioning. The interface with the major associated system, the pneumatic system (Chapter 36 of ATA 100) is at the inlet of the air conditioning shutoff valves. This boundary definition aligns with that in the…
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On Soot Sampling: Considerations when Sampling for TEM Imaging and Differential Mobility Spectrometer

Brunel University London-Behzad Rohani
Norwegian Univ of Science and Technology-David Robert Emberson, Ragnhild Sæterli PhD, Terese Lovas
Published 2019-09-09 by SAE International in United States
Particulate matter (PM) has been sampled from a compression ignition engine using a differential mobility spectrometer (Cambustion DMS 500) and for imaging in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) with the aim of coupling these two measuring techniques. A known issue when coupling these two methods is that a devise like the DMS samples all PM, and the TEM only soot. To help resolve this issue, a thermal denuder was designed and built to remove all volatile organic compounds (VOC) from the sample prior to entering the DMS. For TEM imaging, soot was either collected directly onto a TEM grid using the thermophoretic effect or collected onto quartz filters with the soot then transferred onto the TEM grids. The direct to grid technique did not work after the denuder due to the gas temperature being too low for the thermophoretic effect; hence the reason to collect some soot using the quartz filters. Soot was removed from the filters using an ethanol wash/sonication technique. Morphology; diameter of gyration, projected area, primary particle size and fractal dimension have…
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