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BOLT, MACHINE - HEXAGON HEAD, PD SHANK, TITANIUM AMS4967 (UNS R56400), .500-20 UNJF-3A

E-25 General Standards for Aerospace and Propulsion Systems
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AS9638B
  • Current
Published 2020-03-24 by SAE International in United States

SCOPE IS UNAVAILABLE.

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Advancements of Superplastic Forming and Diffusion Bonding of Titanium Alloys for Heat Critical Aerospace Applications

The Boeing Company-Eve Taylor Burkhart, Larry Hefti
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-0033
Published 2020-03-10 by SAE International in United States
Titanium’s high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance makes it ideal for many aerospace applications, especially in heat critical zones. Superplastic Forming (SPF) can be used to form titanium into near-net, complex shapes without springback. The process uses a machined die where inert gas is applied uniformly to the metal sheet, forming the part into the die cavity. Standard titanium alpha-beta alloys, such as 6Al-4V, form at temperatures between 900 and 925°C (1650-1700°F). Recent efforts have demonstrated alloys that form at lower temperatures ranging between 760 and 790°C (1400-1450°F). Lowering the forming temperature reduces the amount of alpha case that forms on the part, which must be removed. This provides an opportunity of starting with a lower gauge material. Lower forming temperatures also limit the amount of oxidation and wear on the tool and increase the life of certain press components, such as heaters and platens. A variation of this process is SPF combined with Diffusion Bonding (SPF/DB) of two or more titanium sheets to produce integrally stiffened structures with limited fasteners and less weight than…
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Copper Strengthens 3D-Printed Titanium

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-36190
Published 2020-03-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Titanium alloys used in additive manufacturing often cool and bond together in column-shaped crystals during the 3D printing process, making them prone to cracking or distortion. And unlike aluminum or other commonly used metals, there is no commercial grain refiner for titanium that manufacturers can use to effectively refine the microstructure to avoid these issues.

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Titanium Alloy, Round Bar and Wire 3Al - 8V - 6Cr - 4Mo - 4Zr Consumable Electrode Melted Solution Heat Treated and Cold Drawn

AMS G Titanium and Refractory Metals Committee
  • Aerospace Material Specification
  • AMS4957G
  • Current
Published 2020-01-14 by SAE International in United States
This specification covers a titanium alloy in the form of round bar and wire, 0.625 inch (15.88 mm) and under in nominal diameter or thickness.
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Titanium Alloy Bars, Forgings and Forging Stock 7.0Al - 4.0Mo Annealed

AMS G Titanium and Refractory Metals Committee
  • Aerospace Material Specification
  • AMS6915C
  • Current
Published 2020-01-14 by SAE International in United States
This specification covers a titanium alloy in the form of bars up through 6.000 inches (152.40 mm) inclusive, in nominal diameter or least distance between parallel sides, forgings of thickness up through 6.000 inches (152.40 mm), inclusive and stock for forging of any size.
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Titanium Alloy Sheet 6Al - 4V Driver Sheet

AMS G Titanium and Refractory Metals Committee
  • Aerospace Material Specification
  • AMS4932D
  • Current
Published 2019-12-27 by SAE International in United States
This specification covers a titanium alloy in the form of sheet.
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Multicriteria Optimization, Sensitivity Analysis, and Prediction of Bond Characteristics of Vacuum Diffusion Bonded Aero Engine Ti6Al4V Alloy Joints

SAE International Journal of Aerospace

Annamalai University, India-T. Pragatheswaran, S. Rajakumar, V. Balasubramanian, S. Kavitha
Materials Group, Gas Turbine Research Establishment (GTRE), India-Vijay Petley, Shweta Verma
  • Journal Article
  • 01-12-02-0008
Published 2019-12-13 by SAE International in United States
Joining titanium (Ti) alloys with conventional processes is difficult due to their complex structural properties and ability of phase transformation. Concerning all the difficulties, diffusion bonding is considered as an appropriate process for joining Ti alloys. Ti6Al4V, which is an α+β alloy widely used for aero engine component manufacturing, is diffusion bonded in this investigation. The diffusion bonding process parameters such as bonding temperature, bonding pressure, and holding time were optimized to achieve desired bonding characteristics such as shear strength, bonding strength, bonding ratio, and thickness ratio using response surface methodology (RSM). Empirical relationships were developed for the prediction of the bond characteristics, and sensitivity analysis was performed to determine the increment and decrement tendency of the shear strength with respect to the bonding parameters. Various criteria were applied to achieve the desired bond characteristics and their effects; optimum values and limits were evaluated through graphical and numerical optimization. The predicted and experimented results are validated and found that they are in good agreement with each other. The microstructural examination and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis…
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Reducing the High Cost Of Titanium

Aerospace & Defense Technology: December 2019

  • Magazine Article
  • 19AERP12_03
Published 2019-12-01 by SAE International in United States

Titanium is neither a precious metal nor rare, yet among industrial metals it has the reputation for being very expensive. It's the fourth most abundant metallic element and the ninth most abundant of all the elements in the earth's crust. Its commercially useful oxide ore occurs in the minerals rutile and ilmenite and numerous iron ores, and exploitable ore deposits are liberally scattered around the world in Australia, Canada, India, Malaysia, Norway, Russia, South Africa and the U.S. But due to its properties and high cost it has often been referred to as unobtanium.

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Reducing the High Cost Of Titanium

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35667
Published 2019-12-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Titanium is neither a precious metal nor rare, yet among industrial metals it has the reputation for being very expensive. It's the fourth most abundant metallic element and the ninth most abundant of all the elements in the earth's crust. Its commercially useful oxide ore occurs in the minerals rutile and ilmenite and numerous iron ores, and exploitable ore deposits are liberally scattered around the world in Australia, Canada, India, Malaysia, Norway, Russia, South Africa and the U.S. But due to its properties and high cost it has often been referred to as unobtanium.

Shape Memory Alloy with Adjustable, Wide-Ranging Actuation Temperatures

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35711
Published 2019-12-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Innovators at NASA's Glenn Research Center have developed a new Nickel Titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy (SMA) with additions of Hafnium (Hf) and Zirconium (Zr) that offers a broader transformation temperature range and greater dimensional stability than any other SMA on the market. In spite of their many unique properties, broad commercial success of SMAs has remained elusive due to limited phase transformation temperatures and dimensional instability in high cycle applications.