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Self-Sealing Breakaway Valves for Crash-Resistant Aircraft Fuel Systems

AE-5A Aerospace Fuel, Inerting and Lubrication Sys Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AIR1616B
  • Current
Published 2020-03-19 by SAE International in United States
MIL-STD-1290, 14 CFR 27.952, and 14 CFR 29.952 provide crash resistant fuel system design and test criteria that significantly minimize fuel leaks and occurrence of post-crash fire in survivable impacts. This document does not change and does not authorize changes in or deviations from MIL-Standard or regulatory requirements. This document provides guidance for the design, performance, and test criteria for self-sealing breakaway valves.
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Low Cost Reconfigurable Jig Tooling and In-Process Metrology for High Accuracy Prototype Rotorcraft Wing Assembly

University of Nottingham-Richard J. Crossley, Svetan Ratchev
Published 2019-09-16 by SAE International in United States
Reconfigurable tooling frames consisting of steel box sections and bolted friction clamps offer an opportunity to replace traditional expensive welded steel tooling. This well publicized reconfigurable reusable jig tooling has been investigated for use in the assembly of a prototype compound helicopter wing.Due to the aircraft configuration, the wing design is pinned at both ends and therefore requires a higher degree of end to end accuracy, over the 4m length, than conventional wings. During the investigation some fundamental issues are approached, including:Potential cost savings and variables which effect the business case.Achievable Jig accuracy.Potential sources of instability that may affect accuracy over time.Repeatability of measurements with various features and methods.Typical jig stability over 24hrs including effects of small temperature fluctuations.Deflections that occur due to loading.The cost benefit of reusable tooling in a low volume prototype scenario is examined followed by the design of the jig and location features to enable the accurate build and certification documentation to be completed. A prototype 4m test jig comprising of commercially available components and bespoke machined ‘pick-ups’ is presented.Hardware and…
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Advanced Assembly Solutions for the Airbus RACER Joined-Wing Configuration

University of Nottingham-David Bainbridge, Konstantinos Bacharoudis, Andrea Cini, Alison Turner, Atanas Popov, Svetan Ratchev
Published 2019-09-16 by SAE International in United States
The Rapid And Cost Effective Rotorcraft (RACER) is being developed by Airbus Helicopters (AH) to demonstrate a new Vertical Take-Off and Landing configuration to fill the mobility gap between conventional helicopters and aeroplanes. RACER is a compound rotorcraft featuring wings and multiple rotors. The wing arrangement suggested by AH is defined as a staggered bi-plane joined configuration with an upper and a lower straight wing, either side of the fuselage, connected at their outboard extent to form a triangular structure. The ASTRAL consortium, consisting of the University of Nottingham and GE Aviation Systems, are responsible for the design, manufacture, assembly and testing of the wings. Producing an optimised strategy to assemble a joined-wing configuration for a passenger carrying rotorcraft is challenging and novel. The objective of this work concerns all aspects of assembling the joined-wing structure.The joined-wing and fuselage structures will be produced independently and mated together during the final RACER assembly. A multi-stage process will deliver the joined-wing assembly and ensure it will fit to the fuselage. Producing the individual wing structures requires a…
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Safety Assessment of General Aviation Airplanes and Rotorcraft in Commercial Service

S-18C ARP5150A and ARP5151A Working Group
  • Aerospace Standard
  • ARP5151A
  • Current
Published 2019-08-20 by SAE International in United States
This document describes a process that may be used to perform the ongoing safety assessment for (1) GAR aircraft and components (hereafter, aircraft), and (2) commercial operators of GAR aircraft. The process described herein is intended to support an overall safety management program. It is to help a company establish and meet its own internal standards. The process described herein identifies a systematic means, but not the only means, to assess continuing airworthiness. Ongoing safety management is an activity dedicated to assuring that risk is identified and properly eliminated or controlled. The safety management process includes both safety assessment and economic decision-making. While economic decision-making (factors related to scheduling, parts, and cost) is an integral part of the safety management process, this document addresses only the ongoing safety assessment process. This ongoing safety assessment process includes safety problem identification and corrective action, tracking of problems, the application of “lessons learned” to improve the efficiency of the process, and reduction of the time to achieve corrective action in the field. ARP5150 is the recommended practice for…
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Tiltrotor Aircraft

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-34874
Published 2019-08-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Bell Helicopter Fort Worth, TX 817-280-2011

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Aerospace Fuel System Specifications and Standards

AE-5A Aerospace Fuel, Inerting and Lubrication Sys Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AIR1408B
  • Current
Published 2019-05-24 by SAE International in United States
This report lists documents that aid and govern the design of aircraft and missile fuel systems. The report lists the military and industry specifications and standards and the most notable design handbooks that are commonly used in fuel system design. Note that only the principle fuel specifications for the U.S. and Europe (Military Specifications, ASTM, and Def Stan) have been included within this report. The specifications and standards section has been divided into two parts: a master list arranged numerically of all industry and military specifications and standards, and a component list that provides a functional breakdown and a cross-reference of these documents. It is intended that this report be a supplement to specifications ARP8615, MIL-F-17874, and JSSG 2009. Revisions and amendments which are correct for the specifications and standards are not listed. The fuel system design handbooks are listed for fuels and for system and component design.
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Aircraft Flexible Tanks General Design and Installation Recommendations

AE-5A Aerospace Fuel, Inerting and Lubrication Sys Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AIR1664A
  • Current
Published 2019-05-07 by SAE International in United States
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) includes general information about the various types and styles of flexible tanks and the tank-mounted fittings that adapt the tank to the surrounding structure and fluid-system plumbing. Recommendations are given relative to the dimensional layout of the tank when these recommendations serve to avoid tank fabrication problems and tank/structure interface problems. As a part of these recommendations, critical dimensions of plumbing adapter fittings are discussed and recommendations made. Tank manufacturing tolerances are given. Recommendations are made relative to cavity design and preparation to facilitate a reliable installation. The special installation requirements of nonself-sealing, self-sealing, and crash-resistant tanks are discussed. This document is not intended to replace the information or requirements of the military and commercial procurement specifications listed in Section 2. No attempt has been made, except in a very general way, to include physical property data such as weight and thickness of the composite materials available in the industry. Such materials are too numerous and vary too much between manufacturers. Whenever specific data or advice is required, it…
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Evaluation of Aeronautical Design Standard - 33 Using a UH-60A Black Hawk

Aerospace & Defense Technology: February 2019

  • Magazine Article
  • 19AERP02_09
Published 2019-02-01 by SAE International in United States

Flight tests determine whether performance standards developed for scout and attack class rotorcraft can be applied to utility helicopters.

In 1982, the U.S. Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate (AFDD), then assigned under the U.S. Army Aviation Systems Command (AVSCOM), began development of a new handling qualities specification for military rotorcraft. This effort resulted in the U.S. Army's initial Aeronautical Design Standard-33 (ADS-33A), “Handling Qualities Requirements for Military Rotorcraft,” published in May 1987. It was initially applied to the RAH-66 Comanche Helicopter program, meaning the handling qualities requirements generally related more to scout and attack classes of rotorcraft. As more data became available and lessons learned emerged from using ADS-33A, refinements were implemented into ADS-33B and ADS-33C).

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Evaluation of Aeronautical Design Standard – 33 Using a UH-60A Black Hawk

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-33764
Published 2019-02-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

In 1982, the U.S. Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate (AFDD), then assigned under the U.S. Army Aviation Systems Command (AVSCOM), began development of a new handling qualities specification for military rotorcraft. This effort resulted in the U.S. Army's initial Aeronautical Design Standard–33 (ADS-33A), “Handling Qualities Requirements for Military Rotorcraft,” published in May 1987. It was initially applied to the RAH-66 Comanche Helicopter program, meaning the handling qualities requirements generally related more to scout and attack classes of rotorcraft. As more data became available and lessons learned emerged from using ADS-33A, refinements were implemented into ADS-33B and ADS-33C).

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Synthetic Aperture Radar for Helicopter Landing in Degraded Visual Environments

Aerospace & Defense Technology: February 2019

  • Magazine Article
  • 19AERP02_10
Published 2019-02-01 by SAE International in United States

New technology could give helicopters the ability to overcome zero-visibility brownout conditions during landing.

The development of sensors to assist helicopter landing in degraded visual environments (DVEs) is currently an important US Army requirement addressing the Survivability of Future Vertical Lift Platforms program, one of the Army's modernization priorities.

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