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Q&A

Automotive Engineering: September 2019

  • Magazine Article
  • 19AUTP09_15
Published 2019-09-01 by SAE International in United States

Few battery experts in the mobility industry can match the engineer/entrepreneur spirit of Subash Dhar. In a career spanning nearly 40 years, Dhar is co-inventor of over 45 patents and patent applications in the field of advanced batteries and fuel cell technologies. He led the team that developed and commercialized the nickel-metal hydride technology used in the Toyota Prius and has served in leadership positions at XALT Energy, Ener-1, EnerDel, and Ovonic.

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Hybrid and EV First and Second Responder Recommended Practice

Hybrid - EV Committee
  • Ground Vehicle Standard
  • J2990_201907
  • Current
Published 2019-07-29 by SAE International in United States
xEVs involved in incidents present unique hazards associated with the high voltage system (including the battery system). These hazards can be grouped into three categories: chemical, electrical, and thermal. The potential consequences can vary depending on the size, configuration, and specific battery chemistry. Other incidents may arise from secondary events such as garage fires and floods. These types of incidents are also considered in the recommended practice (RP). This RP aims to describe the potential consequences associated with hazards from xEVs and suggest common procedures to help protect emergency responders, tow and/or recovery, storage, repair, and salvage personnel after an incident has occurred with an electrified vehicle. Industry design standards and tools were studied and where appropriate, suggested for responsible organizations to implement. Lithium ion (Li-ion) batteries used for vehicle propulsion power are the assumed battery system of this RP. This chemistry is the prevailing technology associated with high voltage vehicle electrification today and the foreseeable future. The hazards associated with Li-ion battery chemistries are addressed in this RP. Other chemistries and alternative propulsion systems…
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Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH) Hybrid Battery Systems

  • Professional Development
  • PD291811
Published 2018-06-29

This course from SAE International training partner, FutureTech*, is a MUST for everyone servicing hybrid vehicles. NiMH battery systems continue primary battery technology in hybrid vehicles and have been since the 2000 model year. If a technical professional doesn’t know the fundamentals of NiMH operation it is impossible for them to perform a solid diagnosis or repair. This course will concentrate on the NiMH technology, how it performs as it ages, how it can effect vehicle performance and fuel economy, and how to test it by using a scan tool. NiMH battery systems continue to be used in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) applications and provide an excellent foundation in high voltage battery pack systems. This course will include NiMH battery cell operation, cell/module failure modes, diagnostic testing methods, battery hardware components, battery stress testing techniques – and how some of these areas differ from Lithium systems.

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Industry Review of xEV Battery Size Standards

Battery Cell Size Standardization Committee
  • Ground Vehicle Standard
  • J3124_201806
  • Current
Published 2018-06-12 by SAE International in United States
This Technical Information Report (TIR) will review the global industry battery size standards for xEV vehicles to provide guidance on available cell sizes for engineers developing battery powered vehicles. The TIR will include a review of the sizes and standards that are currently being developed or used for cylindrical cells, pouch (or polymer) cells, and for prismatic can cells. The lithium-ion cell will be the focus of this survey, but module and pack level size standards, where available, will also be included.
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A Technical, Environmental and Financial Analysis of Hybrid Buses Used for Public Transport

CIMEC-CONICET-UNL-Norberto Marcelo Nigro
CONICET-FCEIA-UNR-Mauro Carignano
Published 2018-04-03 by SAE International in United States
This paper presents a technical, financial and environmental analysis of four different hybrid buses operated under Buenos Aires driving conditions. A conventional diesel bus is used as reference and three electric hybrids equipped with different energy storage technologies, Li-Ion, NiMH batteries and double layer capacitors (ultracapacitors), are evaluated, along with a hydraulic hybrid platform which uses high-pressure accumulators as its energy buffer. The operating conditions of the buses are set using real driving GPS data collected from various bus routes within the city. The different vehicle platforms are modeled on AUTONOMIE SA and validated by comparing the obtained fuel consumption results to those reported by local transport authorities and values found in the literature. The embedded energy and CO2 emissions of each platform are estimated using GREET and the total cost of ownership of each vehicle is calculated and compared to that of the conventional bus. Furthermore, aging models are proposed to evaluate the life duration of the batteries and ultracapacitors. Results show that, independent of the energy storage technology, the fuel economy performance of…
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Energy Storage Thermal Management

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-28125
Published 2018-01-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

A well-designed thermal management system is critical to the life and performance of electric-drive vehicles (EDVs), hybrids (HEVs), plug-in hybrids (PHEVs), and all-electric vehicles (EVs). Temperature and temperature uniformity both significantly affect the performance, lifespan, and safety of vehicle energy storage devices. NREL evaluates electrical and thermal performance of battery cells, modules, and packs, full energy storage systems, and the interaction of these systems with other vehicle components. The lab's performance assessments factor in the design of the thermal management system, the thermal behavior of the cell, battery lifespan, and safety of the energy storage system, as well as full integration into a vehicle.

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The Battery Man SPEAKS

Automotive Engineering: November 3, 2016

Lindsay Brooke
  • Magazine Article
  • 16AUTP11_02
Published 2016-11-01 by SAE International in United States

The speed of progress in automotive lithium batteries has impressed AABC's Dr. Menahem Anderman. So has silicon-graphite anode technology development from Tesla and Panasonic.

The future of vehicle electrification is all about the battery. The industry's steady progress in reducing lithium-ion battery cost while increasing energy density, durability and reliability has surprised one of its leading experts, who is quick to admit a miscalculation he made six years ago.

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Recommended Practice for Packaging of Electric Vehicle Battery Modules

Battery Cell Size Standardization Committee
  • Ground Vehicle Standard
  • J1797_201608
  • Current
Published 2016-08-02 by SAE International in United States
This SAE Recommended Practice provides for common battery designs through the description of dimensions, termination, retention, venting system, and other features required in an electric vehicle application. The document does not provide for performance standards. Performance will be addressed by SAE J1798. This document does provide for guidelines in proper packaging of battery modules to meet performance criteria detailed in J1766.
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Designing a Robot to Counter Vehicle-Borne Improvised Explosive Devices

Aerospace & Defense Technology: May 2016

  • Magazine Feature Article
  • 16AERP05_05
Published 2016-05-01 by SAE International in United States

The use of Vehicle-Borne Improvised Explosive Devices (VBIED) has increased each year. Current anti-VBIED technology is not only expensive, but requires months or years of training by Explosive Ordinance Disposal (EOD) technicians to operate the equipment. The process of unloading the EOD robot, attaching the detonation wire to the robot, attaching the water charge to the EOD robot, driving the water charge to the VBIED, placing the charge under the vehicle, and then retrieving the EOD robot is a time consuming event. With a typical EOD robot costing $100k - $200k, there is a large financial risk to the EOD team if the robot is damaged or destroyed in the process. WM Robots PAWN was developed to offer the EOD technicians another option in reducing the time needed to neutralize the threat and cost of the operation.

Low cost, expendable;

Video for non-Line of Sight (nLoS) operation;

500 feet of tethered operation, including control, video transmission, and electronic detonation cable;

Simple operation, minimal training to operate;

Operation on semi-improved roads with normal debris;

Deployment in third world countries.

Designing a Robot to Counter Vehicle-Borne Improvised Explosive Devices

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-24647
Published 2016-05-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

The use of Vehicle-Borne Improvised Explosive Devices (VBIED) has increased each year. Current anti-VBIED technology is not only expensive, but requires months or years of training by Explosive Ordinance Disposal (EOD) technicians to operate the equipment. The process of unloading the EOD robot, attaching the detonation wire to the robot, attaching the water charge to the EOD robot, driving the water charge to the VBIED, placing the charge under the vehicle, and then retrieving the EOD robot is a time consuming event. With a typical EOD robot costing $100k - $200k, there is a large financial risk to the EOD team if the robot is damaged or destroyed in the process. WM Robots PAWN was developed to offer the EOD technicians another option in reducing the time needed to neutralize the threat and cost of the operation.