Your Selections

Lubricants
Show Only

Collections

File Formats

Content Types

Dates

Sectors

Topics

Authors

Publishers

Affiliations

Committees

Events

Magazine

   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.
new

A Computational Study of the Lubricant Transport into Oil Control Ring Groove

Sloan Automotive Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Tech-Tianshi Fang, Zhen Meng, Sebastian Ahling, Tian Tian
  • Technical Paper
  • 2019-01-2362
Published 2019-12-19 by SAE International in United States
Lubricant transport into an oil control ring (OCR) groove through the clearance between the lower flank of the OCR and the groove was studied. A primary driving force of such lubricant transport is a dynamic pressure on the outer end of the clearance. The magnitude of the pressure depends on the flow pattern in the skirt chamfer region. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) was employed to simulate the multiphase flow involving lubricant and gas in a skirt chamfer region. A correlation to predict the dynamic pressure was proposed and validated. The amount of lubricant transport into an OCR groove was found remarkable in a high-speed full-load condition.
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.
new

Lubricant Impact on Friction by Engine Component: A Motored Friction Tear Down Assessment of a Production 3.6L Engine

Ricardo Inc.-Stephen Cakebread
Ricardo UK Ltd-Phil Carden, Andrew de Vries
  • Technical Paper
  • 2019-01-2239
Published 2019-12-19 by SAE International in United States
Worldwide, Fuel Economy (FE) legislation increasingly influences vehicle and engine design, and drives friction reduction. The link between lubricant formulation and mechanical friction is complex and depends on engine component design and test cycle. This Motored Friction Tear Down (MFTD) study characterizes the friction within a 3.6L V6 engine under operating conditions and lubricant choices relevant to the legislated FE cycles. The high-fidelity MFTD results presented indicate that the engine is a low-friction engine tolerant of low viscosity oils. Experiments spanned four groups of engine hardware (reciprocating, crankshaft, valvetrain, oil pump), five lubricants (four candidates referenced against an SAE 0W-20) and five temperature regimes. The candidate lubricants explored the impact of base oil viscosity, viscosity modifier (VM) and friction modifier (FM) content. The results indicate that (i) a prototype SAE 0W-8 fluid generated the largest overall reduction in friction, (ii) the valvetrain group responded well to FM content, and (iii) an SAE 0W-20 with alternative VM performed remarkably well at low temperatures (-7°C to 30°C). In order to understand the significance of that engine friction…
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.
new

Development of Low Viscosity 0W-16 Fuel-Saving Engine Oil using a Synergistic Optimization of an Innovative Base Oil and Performant Additives while Maintaining Engine Durability in a ILSAC GF6-B Environment

INFINEUM-CONSIGNY Mathieu, HERRY Camille
TOTAL Marketing & Services-CHAMPAGNE Nicolas, USSA-ALDANA Paula
  • Technical Paper
  • 2019-01-2240
Published 2019-12-19 by SAE International in United States
Lowering fuel consumption whilst maintaining engine life continues to be a challenge for the lubricant industry. Forthcoming ILSAC GF-6 specification and new emission regulations make this challenge even harder to overcome. Knowledge concerning innovative polyalkylene glycol (PAG) chemistry combined with expertise in engine oil formulation (additives and mineral base oils) and a deep understanding of the friction within the engine were used to develop a 0W- 16 engine oil with better fuel economy performance than other 0W-16 oils present in the market.Indeed, to accurately measure the friction on several part of the engine, a 1.2 L supercharged gasoline engine was first dismantled to measure the lubricant friction and wear capabilities of different lubricant formulations (containing group III base oil, additives and OSP HVI) on different engine parts. An initial optimization of the individual formulation components was realized to reduce the friction as much as possible whilst still maintaining wear protection performance. Additives were chosen to interact synergistically with OSP HVI. A second optimization was subsequently carried out using the whole engine in a friction torque…
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.
new

New CO2 / Fuel Consumption Certification Cycles and Design Implications for Fuel Efficient Lubricants

Nissan Motor Co., Ltd.-Takumaru Sagawa, Sachiko Okuda
TOTAL Marketing & Services-Gautier Burette, Khalid Ait Hammou, Mickaël Debord, Loïc Marlière
  • Technical Paper
  • 2019-01-2367
Published 2019-12-19 by SAE International in United States
During this decade, the constant increase and globalization of passenger car sales has led countries to adopt a common language for the treatment of CO2 and other pollutant emissions. In this regard, the WLTC - World-wide harmonized Light duty Test Cycle - stands as the new global reference cycle for fuel consumption, CO2 and pollutant emissions across the globe.Regulations keep a constant pressure on CO2 emission reduction leading vehicle manufacturers and component suppliers to modify hardware to ensure compliance. Within this balance, lubricants remain worthwhile contributors to lowering CO2 emission and fuel consumption. Yet with WTLC, new additional lubricant designs are likely to be required to ensure optimized friction due to its new cycle operating conditions, associated powertrain hardware and worldwide product use.Through friction torque and vehicle test campaigns, NISSAN and TOTAL have conducted a complete study to assess particularly how the Fuel Economy (FE) lubricants originally designed for JC08 (official Japanese driving cycle) or NEDC (New European Driving Cycle) will perform on the new WTLC.Beyond this initial state of art, the study was designed…
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.
new

Functional Olefin Copolymers for Low Viscosity Energy Efficiency HDEO and PCMO

Afton Chemical Corporation-Carranza A., Jiang S., Devlin M. T., Sheldon B., Hux K., Walker C., Wyatt W.
  • Technical Paper
  • 2019-01-2201
Published 2019-12-19 by SAE International in United States
There is still a need in the industry for engine oils that have low viscosities to improve vehicle fuel efficiency but also protect engines from wear. Viscosity modifiers (VMs) are chief additives responsible for adjusting the viscometric characteristics of automotive lubricants. Most notably, VMs have a significant impact on a lubricant's viscosity-temperature relationship as indicated by viscosity index (VI), cold cranking simulator (CCS) viscosity, and high temperature high shear (HTHS) viscosity of engine oils. Functional copolymers bearing branched, linear, or anti-wear functionalities have been synthesized and evaluated for viscometric and wear protection performance. The resulting polymers improved tribofilm formation, shear stability and CCS viscosities. Indirect benefits including Noack improvement and trim oil reduction were observed.
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.
new

Impact of Engine Oil Additives on Nanostructure and Oxidation Kinetics of Diesel and Synthetic Biodiesel Particulate Matters using Electron Microscopy

King Mongkut’s Institute of Technology Ladkrabang-Phyozin Koko, Preechar Karin, Chinda Charoenphonphanich
National Science and Technology Development Agency-Nuwong Chollacoop
  • Technical Paper
  • 2019-01-2351
Published 2019-12-19 by SAE International in United States
Physicochemical characteristics of particulate matters which are influenced by engine oil additives from engine combustion of diesel and synthetic biodiesel: hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO) were successfully investigated using electron microscopy, electron dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. The agglomerate structure of diesel PM, HVO PM and diesel blending lubricant PM are similar in micro-scales. However, nanostructure of soot is a spherical shape composed of curve line crystallites while the metal oxide ash nanostructure is composed of parallel straight line hatch patterns. The oxidation kinetics of fuel blending lubricant PMs are higher than neat fuel PMs due to catalytic effect of incombustible metal additives from engine lubricating oil.
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.
new

Low Friction and Low Viscosity Final Drive Oil

JXTG Nippon Oil & Energy Corporation-Mona Ariyama, Hitoshi Komatsubara
Nissan Motor Co., Ltd.-Tomoo Kubo, Naoto Akie, Yuji Okamoto, Sachiko Okuda, Takumaru Sagawa
  • Technical Paper
  • 2019-01-2336
Published 2019-12-19 by SAE International in United States
The new lubricant was newly developed for differential gear unit to contribute to all friction factors/conditions (Boundary, Hydrodynamic & those Mixed Lubrication) even if the differential gear is operating under very severe conditions such as high-gear-contact pressure and highly sliding speed. The main concept of development was selecting and formulating the optimized additives for severe lubrication conditions in order to achieve the best balance between thinner-film thickness and extreme pressure performance. In conclusion, by the application of both synthetic base oil instead of mineral one and activation technology of MoDTC in spite of ZnDTP free formulation, it is finally realized to reduce the torque of final drive unit by 40% and it can be estimated the 0.5% of CO2 reduction in actual vehicles.
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.
new

Art of fuel economy lubricant formulation: How appropriate fuel economy assessment tools and new technologies are opening-up new formulation spaces for the next generation fuel economy lubricants

Infineum Japan Ltd.-Tsuyoshi Matsui
Infineum UK Ltd.-Thomas Featherstone, Peter Wright
  • Technical Paper
  • 2019-01-2242
Published 2019-12-19 by SAE International in United States
Designing fuel economy lubricants is an art; finding the right balance between fuel economy and durability requirements is complex, with many trade-offs. To open new formulation spaces with ever increasing fuel economy, a deep understanding of how lubricating oils respond to different drive cycles, engine/transmission type and any coating properties, e.g. DLC, is required.In this paper, we describe how the implementation of WLTC requires lubricant optimization to deliver improved fuel economy under this test cycle and therefore, lubricant viscosity reduction becomes more important. We also illustrate optimization of the sludge system is key to reducing overall viscosity of lubricants for ultra low viscosity application, such as in SAE 0W- 8 viscosity grade oils. To meet the cleanliness challenges in an SAE 0W-8 environment, we describe a developmental sludge handling system with improved cleanliness at constant viscosity to conventional SAE 0W-8 lubricants. A SAE 0W-8 demonstration oil with the developmental sludge handling system at equivalent sludge handling to a conventional system showed lower viscosity properties and demonstrated improved fuel economy performance in a motored rig test…
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.
new

Studies on Characteristics of Nanoparticles Generated in a Gasoline Direct-Injection Engine

HORIBA, Ltd.-Kunio Tabata, Motonobu Takahashi, Kenji Takeda, Kazuya Tsurumi
SUBARU CORPORATION-Yasuyuki Kiya, Shota Tobe, Akira Ogura
  • Technical Paper
  • 2019-01-2328
Published 2019-12-19 by SAE International in United States
Particles generated from lubricant in a gasoline direct injection (*GDI) engine were investigated in detail with the aim to understand the influence of components in lubricant on the amount of particles generated as well as their size. Analytical approach employed in this study was real-time engine tests combined with X-ray spectroscopic and electron-microscopic analyses. Real-time engine tests where particle number (PN) and particle size distribution were consecutively measured with oil consumption for lubricants with different formulas enabled us to extract information regarding lubricant-derived particles. This can be achieved only when sulfur species in lubricant are used as a “tracer” and thus, sulfur-free fuel possessing low PM Index (i.e., isooctane) needs to be used for the measurements.It was revealed that the size of particles increased with an increase in oil consumption in the vicinity of 10 nm, and such particles were assumed to be mainly generated as a result of combustion of metal-based additives used in lubricant. Moreover, STEM-EDX images strongly indicated that the particles with a ~10 nm diameter are composed of metal oxides, sulfates…
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Petroleum Base Instrument Bearing Lubricant Viscosity 15

AMS B Finishes Processes and Fluids Committee
  • Aerospace Material Specification
  • AMS3055B
  • Current
Published 2019-11-04 by SAE International in United States
This specification covers the requirements for a refined paraffinic petroleum-base lubricant.
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available