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Utilization of treated waste engine oil -butanol blends as fuel for CI engine operated under an optimal engine parameters

Hindustan Institute of Tech. Science-Prabakaran B
  • Technical Paper
  • 2019-28-2383
To be published on 2019-11-21 by SAE International in United States
Butanol is an attractive alternative fuel to fuel diesel engine. Waste engine oil is causing land pollution and contamination to groundwater a lot. This experimental study is to investigate the performance of treated waste engine oil and butanol as fuel to diesel engine operated under optimal engine operating parameters. This study was conducted in four stages: Treating the waste engine oil; Preparation of blends and testing the properties; Arriving at an optimal injection timing, nozzle opening pressure, compression ratio, and intake air temperature to suit the possible blend of treated waste engine oil and butanol; Testing the possible blend under optimal operating parameters under various load conditions. The properties test indicated that 35% of butanol can be blended with treated engine oil with respect to the essential properties for fueling diesel engine. To optimize the parameters L16 orthogonal array with the Taguchi method was used. The engine test showed that the blend containing 35% butanol produced similar brake thermal efficiency, emissions of oxides of nitrogen, peak in-cylinder pressure, peak heat release rate, ignition delay and…
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End-of-Life Vehicles in India – Regulatory Perspectives

International Centre for Automotive Technology-Vijayanta Ahuja, Shakti N Khanna
  • Technical Paper
  • 2019-28-2580
To be published on 2019-11-21 by SAE International in United States
The unprecedented increment in vehicle sales in the last decade brought several challenges with it. Older vehicles, conforming to lenient emission norms continue to ply on road, continuously producing higher emissions. This not only burdens the environment with air pollution caused due to emissions, but also with land pollution caused due to landfills and the overall impact of utilising more resources excavated through nature to fulfil manufacturing requirements. Due to absence of regulations, older vehicles also compromise on active, passive and pedestrian safety measures. A need was felt to withdraw such vehicles from the roads but due to the lack of incentives for the last vehicle owner, unavailability of infrastructure or policy, though a guideline standard (AIS-129) was published, the idea, in its entirety never came to fruition. This paper discusses the areas affected during and beyond the recycling of the End-of-Life Vehicle (ELV). While the scrap of the vehicle shall be crushed and re-utilised from scrap metal (ferrous and non-ferrous), this paper also discusses potential usage of the components (such as head lamps, RVMs…
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Utilisation Treated Waste Engine oil and Diesohol blends as fuel for Compression Ignition Engine – An Experimental Study

Hindustan Institute of Tech. Science-Prabakaran B
  • Technical Paper
  • 2019-28-2384
To be published on 2019-11-21 by SAE International in United States
Diesel Ethanol (Diesohol) blends are one of the suitable alternative fuel to replace diesel for fueling the compression ignition engines. This experimental study is to utilize optimal fuel blend that contains a higher volume of ethanol in diesel with treated waste engine oil as co-solvent for preventing the phase separation. This study includes three stages: Treating the waste engine oil, preparation of diesel ethanol blends with treated waste engine oil as co-solvent, testing the blends for solubility, properties and performance in a compression ignition engines. Treatment of waste engine oil was conducted in five steps including the acid-clay treatment, in which acetic acid and fuller earth were used as treating materials. Solubility test was conducted for various proportions of diesel-ethanol blends (from 0% to 50% of ethanol by volume) and treated waste engine oil (from 5% to 25%). The stable blends were tested for essential properties as per the ASTM standards. Optimal blend (45%ethanol 15% treated waste engine oil & 40% diesel) was tested for performance, combustion and emission characteristics in a diesel engine at…

Savannah River National Laboratory

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-33683
Published 2019-02-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) — located in Aiken, SC — is the applied research and development laboratory at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS). The laboratory applies state-of-the-art science to provide practical, high-value, cost-effective solutions to complex technical problems. SRNL technologies are used to detect weapons of mass destruction, clean up contaminated groundwater and soil, develop hydrogen as an energy source, support the need for a viable national defense, and safely manage hazardous materials.

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Environmental Control System Contamination

AC-9 Aircraft Environmental Systems Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AIR1539B
  • Current
Published 2017-06-19 by SAE International in United States
This publication will be limited to a discussion of liquid and particulate contaminants which enter the aircraft through the environmental control system (ECS). Gaseous contaminants such as ozone, fuel vapors, sulphates, etc., are not covered in this AIR. It will cover all contamination sources which interface with ECS, and the effects of this contamination on equipment. Methods of control will be limited to the equipment and interfacing ducting which normally falls within the responsibility of the ECS designer.
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Site Selection Considerations for New Re-Located Gas Turbine Engine Test Facilities

EG-1E Gas Turbine Test Facilities and Equipment
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AIR6197
  • Current
Published 2017-06-16 by SAE International in United States
No Abstract Available.
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Methods for Purifying Enzymes for Mycoremediation

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-26857
Published 2017-05-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

This process applies to remediation and restoration of soils contaminated by fuel, polychlorinated biphenyl wastes, etc. While there can be a general beneficial effect of microbial communities, individual plant-fungus combinations can vary in their efficacy in removal of pollutants from the environment. Selection of the most effective combination of plants and fungi is very important for achieving the desired benefits. Not all fungi are created equal, as some die off in contaminated soils. Having a set of enzymes from fungi specifically adapted to conditions in contaminated soils and use of native plant/fungal combinations is a huge advantage. Ectomycorrhizal (EM) mediated remediation of phenolic-based contamination through use of specifically adapted soil and enzymes utilizes plant/fungal combinations that are specifically adapted to conditions created by phenolic application to soils, and the abilities of EM fungi to oxidize these compounds. This platform can be adapted to other ecosystems through field assessments of the EM community in each new site.

Soil Remediation with Plant-Fungal Combinations

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-24110
Published 2016-03-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

This work applies to remediation and restoration of soil contaminated by fuel, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) wastes, etc. While there can be a beneficial effect of microbial communities, individual plant-fungus combinations can vary in their efficacy in removing pollutants from the environment. Having a set of enzymes from fungi specifically adapted to conditions in contaminated soil is a huge advantage.

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Eco-Friendly Recycled PET (Polyethylene Terephthalate) Material for Automotive Canopy Strip Application

Mahindra & Mahindra Ltd-G Karthik, K V Balaji, Rao Venkateshwara, Bagul Rahul
Published 2015-04-14 by SAE International in United States
This paper describes the suitability of recycled polyethylene terephthalate (RPET) material for canopy strip in a commercial vehicle. The material described in this paper is a PET compound recycled from used PET bottles and reinforced with glass fibers so as to meet the product's functional requirements. The application described in this paper is a Canopy strip which is a structural exterior plastic part. Canopy strip acts as a structural frame to hold the Vinyl canopy in both sides of the vehicle. Functionally, the part demands a material with adequate mechanical and thermal properties.Generally, PET bottles are thrown after use thereby creating land pollution. PET being inert takes an extremely long time to degrade thereby occupying huge amount of space in landfills and directly affecting rain water percolation. This work focused on recycling the PET bottles and compounding them suitably so as convert them into useful automotive parts. The parts made out of this sustainable solution were validated for thermal ageing, cold impact and other vehicle level durability performance related tests and found to meet the…
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Case Study: Production of Biodiesel from Frying Oil for Use in Employees Transport Minibuses Inside Fiat's Plant in Brazil

Fiat Chrysler Latam-Júlio Cesar de Souza, Lorena D'Avila do Carmo Andrade, Daniel Bastos de Rezende
Published 2014-09-30 by SAE International in United States
When not disposed properly, the frying oil from the household or restaurants may cause clogging of waste drainage pipes and sewage systems, water contamination and soil sealing. The production of biodiesel from frying oil and its utilization for energy generation is a potential alternative to disposal, adding value to this waste and using it as an energy source. This article presents a case study of a proposal to produce biodiesel from frying oil for fuel up vehicles used to the employees transport inside Fiat's plant in Betim, Brazil. Besides the technical and economic evaluation, a life cycle assessment (LCA) was performed to examine the environmental viability of producing the biodiesel from cooking oil and its use for fuel up the minibuses replacing conventional diesel B5 for B50.
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