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Schlieren System Captures Brilliant Shockwave Images

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35254
Published 2019-10-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Supersonic flight over land is generally prohibited because sonic booms created by shockwaves disturb people on the ground and can damage property. Armstrong innovators are working to solve this problem with a novel system for capturing images of shockwaves created by supersonic aircraft. The Background Oriented Schlieren Using Celestial Objects (BOSCO) technology uses a celestial object, such as the Sun, as a background to secure unique, measurable shockwave images of full-scale aircraft. The patented image-processing technology captures hundreds of observations with each shockwave, benefitting NASA engineers in their efforts to develop a supersonic aircraft that will produce a soft “thump” in place of a disruptive sonic boom.

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Software Accelerates Engine Development for Hypersonic Flight

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35257
Published 2019-10-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

A numerical modeling tool allows for a better understanding of rotating detonation engines (RDEs).

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Hypersonic Flow Simulation towards Space Propulsion Geometries

Universidade Da Beira Interior-Odelma Teixeira, Jose Pascoa
Published 2019-09-16 by SAE International in United States
This work aims to expand the applicability of an open-source numerical tool to solve hypersonic gas dynamic flows for space propulsion geometries. This is done by validating the code using two well-known hypersonic test cases, the double cone and the hollow cylinder flare, used by the NATO Research and Technology Organization for the validation of hypersonic flight for laminar viscous-inviscid interactions (D. Knight, “RTO WG 10 - Test cases for CFD validation of hypersonic flight,” in 40th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting & Exhibit, 2002). The Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulation is conducted using the two-temperature solver hy2Foam that is capable to study external aerodynamics in re-entry flows. In the present work the assessment of hy2Foam to solve hypersonic complex flow features with strong interactions including non-equilibrium effects was demonstrated. Freestream conditions with stagnation enthalpy of 5.44 MJ/kg and Mach number of 12.2, for the double cone case, and stagnation enthalpy of 5.07 MJ/kg and Mach number of 11.3 for the hollow cylinder case were considered. Comparison with newer existing numerical data and experimental data from…
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Video Graphics Modules

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-34536
Published 2019-06-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

WOLF Advanced Technology Stouffville, Ontario, Canada 905-852-1163

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Thermodynamics of Incompressible and Compressible Fluid Flow

AC-9 Aircraft Environmental Systems Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AIR1168/1A
  • Current
Published 2019-04-11 by SAE International in United States
The fluid flow treated in this section is isothermal, subsonic, and incompressible. The effects of heat addition, work on the fluid, variation in sonic velocity, and changes in elevation are neglected. An incompressible fluid is one in which a change in pressure causes no resulting change in fluid density. The assumption that liquids are incompressible introduces no appreciable error in calculations, but the assumption that a gas is incompressible introduces an error of a magnitude that is dependent on the fluid velocity and on the loss coefficient of the particular duct section or piece of equipment. Fig. 1A-1 shows the error in pressure drop resulting from assuming that air is incompressible. With reasonably small loss coefficients and the accuracy that is usually required in most calculations, compressible fluids may be treated as incompressible for velocities less than Mach 0.2. At higher velocities and for large loss coefficients (Kt and 4fL/D), compressible flow analysis should be used.
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Modular Cross-Platform System Gives High-Speed Pilots Better Visual Aids

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-33587
Published 2019-01-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

The ability to fly at supersonic speed without producing unsettling sonic booms would re-open a path to faster commercial aviation. In pursuit of aerodynamics that would soften the boom to a dull thud, NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center engineers developed a ground-based schlieren imaging system that allowed them to photograph shockwaves produced by an aircraft traveling at supersonic speeds.

Air Force Research Laboratory

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-32520
Published 2018-08-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), headquartered at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio, was formed in October 1997 through the consolidation of four former Air Force laboratories and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

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Landing and Taxiing Lights - Design Criteria for Installation

A-20B Exterior Lighting Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • ARP693E
  • Current
Published 2018-07-02 by SAE International in United States
This document includes requirements of installations of adequate landing and taxiing lighting systems in aircraft of the following categories: a Single engine personal and/or liaison type b Light twin engine c Large multiengine propeller d Large multiengine turbojet/turbofan e Military high-performance fighter and attack f Helicopter This document will cover general requirements and recommended practices for all types of landing and taxi lights. More specific recommendations for LED lights in particular can be found in ARP6402.
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The Measurement of Engine Thrust in an Altitude Test Facility

E-33 In Flight Propulsion Measurement Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AIR5771A
  • Current
Published 2018-02-14 by SAE International in United States
This report covers engine tests performed in Altitude Test Facilities (ATFs) with the primary purpose of determining steady state thrust at simulated altitude flight conditions as part of the in-flight thrust determination process. As such it is complementary to AIR1703 and AIR5450, published by the SAE E-33 Technical Committee. The gross thrust determined using such tests may be used to generate other thrust-related parameters that are frequently applied in the assessment of propulsion system performance. For example: net thrust, specific thrust, and exhaust nozzle coefficients. The report provides a general description of ATFs including all the major features. These are: Test cell air supply system. This controls the inlet pressure and includes flow straightening, humidity and temperature conditioning. Air inlet duct and slip joint. Note that the report only covers the case where the inlet duct is connected to the engine, not free jet testing. Thrust stand force measurement system Test cell Cell exhaust system Measurement system The report provides detailed technical information on how the facilities are operated, including: Program planning guidelines Optimization of…
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Optical Method for Detecting Displacements and Strains at Ultra-High Temperatures During Thermo-Mechanical Testing

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-28329
Published 2018-02-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

NASA's Langley Research Center has developed an optical method for detecting displacements and strains at ultra-high temperatures during thermo-mechanical testing. This innovation will provide displacement and strain measurements in high-temperature applications where conventional measurement technologies cannot physically survive. The measurement system has operated in laboratory environments in excess of 2,800 °F.