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Titanium Hydraulic Tubing, Ti-3Al-2.5V Cold Worked and Stress Relieved, Up to 35000 kPa (5080 psi), Requirements for Qualification Testing and Control

G-3, Aerospace Couplings, Fittings, Hose, Tubing Assemblies
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AS5620C
  • Current
Published 2019-06-04 by SAE International in United States

This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) shall be used in conjunction with AMS4946 to provide requirements for qualification testing and for qualified products listing (QPL) and qualified manufacturer listing (QML) for Ti-3Al-2.5V cold worked and stress relieved hydraulic system tubing. The basic tubing shall comply with the requirements of AMS4946.

 

Hydraulic Cylinder Position Sensor Technology

Aerospace & Defense Technology: May 2019

  • Magazine Article
  • 19AERP05_05
Published 2019-05-01 by SAE International in United States

Ensuring precision movement in robotic assemblies.

As the demand for greater control and functionality increases, position-sensor-instrumented hydraulic cylinders are becoming more important in the heavy industry, mobile equipment, and subsea worlds. Position sensors for feedback in hydraulic or pneumatic cylinders have typically used one of three technologies: Linear Variable Inductance Transducers (LVITs), variable resistance potentiometers (Pots), or magnetostrictive transducers (MLDTs). While other sensor technologies have occasionally been used in these applications, the focus of this article is a comparison among these three popular technologies. Ultimately, a user or systems integrator must determine the exact requirements of the application and which technology best satisfies them on a total installed cost versus performance basis. The strengths and weaknesses of linear variable inductance, variable resistance pots, and magnetostrictive sensors are all examined below, together with a feature-by-feature comparison chart.

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Hydraulic Cylinder Position Sensor Technology

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-34335
Published 2019-05-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

As the demand for greater control and functionality increases, position-sensor-instrumented hydraulic cylinders are becoming more important in the heavy industry, mobile equipment, and subsea worlds. Position sensors for feedback in hydraulic or pneumatic cylinders have typically used one of three technologies: Linear Variable Inductance Transducers (LVITs), variable resistance potentiometers (Pots), or magnetostrictive transducers (MLDTs). While other sensor technologies have occasionally been used in these applications, the focus of this article is a comparison among these three popular technologies. Ultimately, a user or systems integrator must determine the exact requirements of the application and which technology best satisfies them on a total installed cost versus performance basis. The strengths and weaknesses of linear variable inductance, variable resistance pots, and magnetostrictive sensors are all examined below, together with a feature-by-feature comparison chart.

 

CRIMPING TOOL AND ACCESSORIES, REMOTE CRIMP HEAD, HYDRAULIC, WIRE SIZE 8 TO 0000 FOR INSULATED AND UN-INSULATED CRIMP BARRELS

AE-8C2 Terminating Devices and Tooling Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AS5259/1B
  • Current
Published 2019-02-11 by SAE International in United States
No Abstract Available.
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Aluminum Alloy Tubing, Hydraulic, Seamless, Drawn, Round 1.0Mg - 0.60Si - 0.28Cu - 0.20Cr (6061-T6) Solution and Precipitation Heat Treated

AMS D Nonferrous Alloys Committee
  • Aerospace Material Specification
  • AMS4083M
  • Current
Published 2019-01-02 by SAE International in United States
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of seamless round tubing with wall thickness from 0.025 to 0.500 inch (0.64 to 12.70 mm), inclusive (see 8.6).
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Hose Assembly, Polytetrafluoroethylene, Metallic Reinforced, Up to 1500 psi and 450 °F, Hydraulic and Pneumatic

G-3, Aerospace Couplings, Fittings, Hose, Tubing Assemblies
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AS1946F
  • Current
Published 2018-12-19 by SAE International in United States
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) defines the requirements for polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) lined, metallic reinforced, hose assemblies suitable for use in aerospace hydraulic, fuel, and lubricating oil systems at temperatures between -67 °F and 450 °F for Class I assemblies, -67 °F and 275 °F for Class II assemblies, and at nominal pressures up to 1500 psi. The hose assemblies are also suitable for use within the same temperature and pressure limitations in aerospace pneumatic systems where some gaseous diffusion through the wall of the PTFE liner can be tolerated. The use of these hose assemblies in pneumatic storage systems is not recommended. In addition, installations in which the limits specified herein are exceeded, or in which the application is not covered specifically by this standard, for example oxygen, shall be subject to the approval of the procuring activity.
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FMVSS 105 Inertia Brake Dynamometer Test Procedure for Vehicles Above 4540 kg GVWR

Truck and Bus Hydraulic Brake Committee
  • Ground Vehicle Standard
  • J2684_201812
  • Current
Published 2018-12-05 by SAE International in United States
This Recommended Practice is derived from the FMVSS 105 vehicle test and applies to two-axle multipurpose passenger vehicles, trucks, and buses with a GVWR above 4540 kg (10000 pounds) equipped with hydraulic service brakes. There are two main test sequences: Development Test Sequence for generic test conditions when not all information is available or when an assessment of brake output at different inputs are required, and FMVSS Test Sequence when vehicle parameters for brake pressure as a function of brake pedal input force and vehicle-specific loading and brake distribution are available. The test sequences are derived from the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 105 (and 121 for optional sections) as single-ended inertia-dynamometer test procedures when using the appropriate brake hardware and test parameters. This recommended practice provides Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs), brake and component manufacturers, as well as aftermarket suppliers, results related to brake output, friction material effectiveness, and corner performance in a laboratory-controlled test environment. The test sequences include different dynamic conditions (braking speeds, temperature, and braking history as outlined in the FMVSS 105);…
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Nomenclature - Hydraulic Backhoes

MTC1, Loaders, Crawlers, Scrapers and Mounted Attachments
  • Ground Vehicle Standard
  • J326_201811
  • Current
Published 2018-11-20 by SAE International in United States
This SAE standard includes hydraulic backhoes which have no more than 190 degrees of rotational swing and are mounted on wheeled tractors and crawler tractors. Illustrations used are not intended to include all existing commercial machines or to be exact descriptions of any particular machine. The illustrations have been chosen to describe the principles to be used in applying this standard.
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Self-Displacing Hydraulic Accumulator

A-6C4 Power Sources Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • ARP4553B
  • Current
Published 2018-09-04 by SAE International in United States
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) provides recommendations for design and test requirements for self-displacing hydraulic accumulators.
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Hydraulic-Based Spherical Robot

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-32473
Published 2018-08-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Current spherical robots rely upon rotating mechanical weights inside the sphere to change the center of gravity of the sphere, causing the robot to roll. The use of rotating mechanical weights is not optimal due to the reliance upon moving parts, which can present burdensome maintenance issues. It would be desirable, for certain applications, to have a spherical robot that does not rely on mechanical weights for propulsion.