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Helicopter Transmissions, A Brief Overview of

Boeing Co.-Patrick R. Darmstadt, Mark Robuck
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-0437
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
Transmission and drivelines as they apply to helicopters are discussed including history, common configurations, and typical, industry design philosophies. A brief history of transmission used in helicopter applications is provided, including an emphasis on the flight critical nature of transmissions and drivelines in helicopter applications and how the helicopter transmission has evolved over their 100 years of service. Common helicopter drivelines are discussed for a variety of helicopter configurations (single main rotor, tandem rotor, and tilt rotor, among others), touching on typical shaft speed and horsepower ranges. Finally, typical helicopter transmission design practices are discussed for gear, bearing, and lubrication systems.
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Application of Extended Messinger Models to Complex Geometries

Georgia Institute of Technology-Avani Gupta, Lakshmi Sankar
NASA John Glenn Research Center-Richard Kreeger
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-0022
To be published on 2020-03-10 by SAE International in United States
Since, ice accretion can significantly degrade the performance and the stability of an airborne vehicle, it is imperative to be able to model it accurately. While ice accretion studies have been performed on airplane wings and helicopter blades in abundance, there are few that attempt to model the process on more complex geometries such as fuselages. This paper proposes a methodology that extends an existing in-house Extended Messinger solver to complex geometries by introducing the capability to work with unstructured grids and carry out spatial surface streamwise marching.For the work presented here commercial solvers such as STAR-CCM+ and ANSYS Fluent are used for the flow field and droplet dispersed phase computations. The ice accretion is carried out using an in-house icing solver called GT-ICE. The predictions by GT-ICE are compared to available experimental data, or to predictions by other solvers such as LEWICE and STAR-CCM+. Three different cases with varying levels of complexity are presented. The first case considered is a commercial transport airfoil, followed by a three-dimensional MS(1)-317 swept wing. Finally, ice accretion calculations…
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CONCURRENT DESIGN OF ENGINES AND SPECIFICATIONS OF STARTING SYSTEMS FOR HELICOPTERS

S-12 Powered Lift Propulsion Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AIR1296
  • Current
Published 2020-01-31 by SAE International in United States
It is recommended that all helicopter engine development programs include an evaluation of engine starting requirements. The evaluation should include starting requirement effects on helicopter weight, cost, and mission effectiveness. The evaluation should be appropriate to the engine stage of development.
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Robotic Helicopter

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35677
Published 2019-12-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Steadicopter Ltd. Migdal HaEmek, Israel +972-4-9592959

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Sensing Applied Load and Damage Effects in Composites with Nondestructive Techniques

Aerospace & Defense Technology: December 2019

  • Magazine Article
  • 19AERP12_08
Published 2019-12-01 by SAE International in United States

Comparing and correlating piezoelectrically induced guided waves, acoustic emission, thermography, and X-ray imaging to determine the effects of applied load on a composite structure.

Composite materials are desirable for aeronautical and aerospace applications for many reasons including their high strength-to-weight ratios, fatigue and corrosion resistance, design adaptability, and performance capabilities in harsh environments. Because of these qualities, composites are useful in many applications such as in armor, helmets, and helicopters, and as structural components.

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Sensing Applied Load and Damage Effects in Composites with Nondestructive Techniques

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35672
Published 2019-12-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Composite materials are desirable for aeronautical and aerospace applications for many reasons including their high strength-to-weight ratios, fatigue and corrosion resistance, design adaptability, and performance capabilities in harsh environments. Because of these qualities, composites are useful in many applications such as in armor, helmets, and helicopters, and as structural components.

Pearl-Like Coating Enhances Lightweight Armor

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35453
Published 2019-11-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

By mimicking the outer coating of pearls (nacre or mother of pearl), researchers created a lightweight plastic that is 14 times stronger and eight times lighter (less dense) than steel. It could be applicable to vests, helmets, and other types of body armor as well as protective armor for ships, helicopters, and other vehicles.

Unmanned Helicopter Drone

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35358
Published 2019-10-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

UAVOS Inc. Mountain View, CA 650-584-3176 www.UAVOS.com

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Low Cost Reconfigurable Jig Tooling and In-Process Metrology for High Accuracy Prototype Rotorcraft Wing Assembly

University of Nottingham-Richard J. Crossley, Svetan Ratchev
Published 2019-09-16 by SAE International in United States
Reconfigurable tooling frames consisting of steel box sections and bolted friction clamps offer an opportunity to replace traditional expensive welded steel tooling. This well publicized reconfigurable reusable jig tooling has been investigated for use in the assembly of a prototype compound helicopter wing.Due to the aircraft configuration, the wing design is pinned at both ends and therefore requires a higher degree of end to end accuracy, over the 4m length, than conventional wings. During the investigation some fundamental issues are approached, including:Potential cost savings and variables which effect the business case.Achievable Jig accuracy.Potential sources of instability that may affect accuracy over time.Repeatability of measurements with various features and methods.Typical jig stability over 24hrs including effects of small temperature fluctuations.Deflections that occur due to loading.The cost benefit of reusable tooling in a low volume prototype scenario is examined followed by the design of the jig and location features to enable the accurate build and certification documentation to be completed. A prototype 4m test jig comprising of commercially available components and bespoke machined ‘pick-ups’ is presented.Hardware and…
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Advanced Assembly Solutions for the Airbus RACER Joined-Wing Configuration

University of Nottingham-David Bainbridge, Konstantinos Bacharoudis, Andrea Cini, Alison Turner, Atanas Popov, Svetan Ratchev
Published 2019-09-16 by SAE International in United States
The Rapid And Cost Effective Rotorcraft (RACER) is being developed by Airbus Helicopters (AH) to demonstrate a new Vertical Take-Off and Landing configuration to fill the mobility gap between conventional helicopters and aeroplanes. RACER is a compound rotorcraft featuring wings and multiple rotors. The wing arrangement suggested by AH is defined as a staggered bi-plane joined configuration with an upper and a lower straight wing, either side of the fuselage, connected at their outboard extent to form a triangular structure. The ASTRAL consortium, consisting of the University of Nottingham and GE Aviation Systems, are responsible for the design, manufacture, assembly and testing of the wings. Producing an optimised strategy to assemble a joined-wing configuration for a passenger carrying rotorcraft is challenging and novel. The objective of this work concerns all aspects of assembling the joined-wing structure.The joined-wing and fuselage structures will be produced independently and mated together during the final RACER assembly. A multi-stage process will deliver the joined-wing assembly and ensure it will fit to the fuselage. Producing the individual wing structures requires a…
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