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Study on Effect of Laser Peening on Inconel 718 Produced by DMLS Technique

Vellore Institute of Technology-Nattudurai Navin Kumar, Aditya Chandrakant Yadav, Kumar Raja, Subramanian Prabhakaran, Chooriyaparambil Damodaran Naiju, Sivaperuman Kalainathan
Published 2019-10-11 by SAE International in United States
In Additive manufacturing, Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) is a rapid manufacturing technique used for manufacturing of functional component. Finely powered metal is melted by using high-energy fiber laser, by Island principle strategy that produces mechanically and thermally stable metallic component with reduced stresses, thermal gradients and at high precision. Inconel is an austenitic chromium nickel-based superalloy often used in the applications which require high strength and temperature resistant. It can retain its properties at high temperature. An attempt is made to examine the effect of laser shot peening (LSP) on DMLS Inconel 718 sample. Microstructure shows elliptical shaped structure and formation of new grain boundaries. The surface roughness of the material has been increased due to the effect of laser shock pulse and ablative nature. Macro hardness increased to 13% on the surface. Depth wise microhardness was investigated, found to be 17% increase on the sub-layer of the material due to the effect of a hardened matrix formed by precipitation hardening and grain size refinement attributed by laser shock peening. SEM analysis shows larger…
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Appraisal of Tribo Meter Study on 20MnCr5 Alloy Steel under Case Hardened and Shot Peened Condition

Shanthi Gears Limited-Vignesh Nataraj
Sri Krishna College of Engg. and Tech.-Soundararajan Ranganathan, Janarthanan Prakash, Dinu Mathew
Published 2019-10-11 by SAE International in United States
This research is limited to study the strength and wear resistance of 20MnCr5 (SAE 5120) alloy steel under monolithic, case hardened and case hardened with shot peening processing condition. Improve the hardness of the material by enhancing the core and surface strength of case hardened with the shot peened sample. The main objective of this proposed work is to conduct the tribometer test by varying the load of 10, 20, 30 and 40N and sliding speed of 193, 386 rpm respectively on wear rate and coefficient of friction be calculated and recorded for this study. Less wear rate and nominal coefficient of friction were observed for case hardened with the shot peened sample. Load increases wear rate increases and the coefficient of friction decreases when sliding distance increases wear rate decreases and the coefficient of friction increases for all the tested samples due to oxide layer formation. After reaching certain load and sliding speed the curve goes linear because of more contact between pin and disc, so that mechanical amalgamation layer will be formed. On…
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Influence of Retained Austenite on Fatigue Performance of Carburized Gears

Comstar Automotive Tech P Ltd.-Rajeshkumar Ramasamy, Seenuvas Sivathanu, Varatharaj Neelakandan, Thulasirajan Ganesan, Praveen Chakrapani Rao
Published 2019-10-11 by SAE International in United States
SAE 8620 and 20CrMo materials were subjected to carburizing process to obtain the identical hardened layer of HRC 61-64. The carburized surface and core properties of the materials were examined and characterized through optical microstructure to measure the presence of cementite carbides and Retained Austenite (RA). From the results, it was found that the SAE 8620 and 20CrMo materials have 10 % and 14% of RA respectively. Whereas, the core and case structure were free from network carbides. The fatigue test was conducted to correlate the RA and fatigue strength of the materials. It was revealed that material with lower RA has higher fatigue strength than material with higher RA. Higher amount of retained austenite leads to reduction in amount of martensitic and compressive residual stress attributed to lower the contact fatigue strength. Untransformed austenite is metastable and is transformed to untempered martensite, which causes brittleness to the component and leads to premature failure.
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Effect of Cryogenic Treatment on Inconel 718 Produced by DMLS Technique

Vellore Institute of Technology-Chooriyaparambil Damodaran Naiju, Kumar Raja, Nattudurai Navin Kumar, Chandrakant Yadav Aditya, Muniappan Senthil Kumar
Published 2019-10-11 by SAE International in United States
The main purpose of this study is to investigate additive manufactured Inconel super alloy subjected to cryogenic treatment (CT). Cryogenic treatment is mainly used in aerospace, defense and automobile application. Direct metal laser sintering is an additive manufacturing technique used for manufacturing of complex and complicated functional components. Inconel is an austenitic chromium nickel based super alloy often used in the applications which require high strength & temperature resistant. In this work, a study is carried out on microstructure and mechanical properties of additive manufactured Inconel 718 when subjected to cryogenic treatment at three different time intervals. The micro-structural evolution of IN718 super-alloy before and after CT was investigated by both optic microscope and scanning electron microscope. Surface roughness and hardness at different CT time intervals has also analyzed. Additionally, XRD technique was used to analyze the surface residual stress. The result shows after three cycles of cryogenic treatment, the hardness of Inconel 718 has been substantially improved at room temperature. Microstructure shows grains in one of the test condition, a larger number of refined…
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Heat Treatment of Carbon and Low-Alloy Steel Parts Minimum Tensile Strength Below 220 ksi (1517 MPa)

AMS E Carbon and Low Alloy Steels Committee
  • Aerospace Material Specification
  • AMS2759/1H
  • Current
Published 2019-09-19 by SAE International in United States
This specification, in conjunction with the general requirements for steel heat treatment covered in AMS2759, establishes the requirements for heat treatment of carbon and low-alloy steel parts to minimum ultimate tensile strengths below 220 ksi (1517 MPa). Parts are defined in AMS2759. Due to limited hardenability in these materials, there are size limits in this specification.
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Heat Treatment of Low-Alloy Steel Parts Minimum Tensile Strength 220 ksi (1517 MPa) and Higher

AMS E Carbon and Low Alloy Steels Committee
  • Aerospace Material Specification
  • AMS2759/2J
  • Current
Published 2019-07-15 by SAE International in United States
This specification, in conjunction with the general requirements for steel heat treatment covered in AMS2759, establishes the requirements for heat treatment of low-alloy steel parts to minimum ultimate tensile strengths of 220 ksi (1517 MPa) and higher. Parts are defined in AMS2759. The requirements for heat treatment of alloy Aermet100 are no longer part of this specification and can be found in AMS2759/3. Due to the limited hardenability of these materials, size limits have been added to this specification.
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Heat Treatment of Carbon and Low-Alloy Steel Parts Minimum Tensile Strength Below 220 ksi (1517 MPa)

AMS E Carbon and Low Alloy Steels Committee
  • Aerospace Material Specification
  • AMS2759/1G
  • Historical
Published 2019-06-17 by SAE International in United States
This specification, in conjunction with the general requirements for steel heat treatment covered in AMS2759, establishes the requirements for heat treatment of carbon and low-alloy steel parts to minimum ultimate tensile strengths below 220 ksi (1517 MPa). Parts are defined in AMS2759. Due to limited hardenability in these materials, there are size limits in this specification.
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BEARING, ROLLER, NEEDLE, DOUBLE ROW, HEAVY DUTY, TRACK ROLLER, SEALED, TYPE VI, INCH

ACBG Rolling Element Bearing Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AS21439D
  • Current
Published 2019-06-06 by SAE International in United States
No Abstract Available.
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Test Strip, Holder, and Gage for Shot Peening

Surface Enhancement Committee
  • Ground Vehicle Standard
  • J442_201906
  • Current
Published 2019-06-06 by SAE International in United States
This SAE standard defines requirements for equipment and supplies to be used in measuring shot peening arc height and other surface enhancement processes. Guidelines for use of these items can be found in SAE J443 and SAE J2597.
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Joining Gun Bonds Metal and Plastic in Seconds

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-34612
Published 2019-06-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

The connection of plastics and metals poses a challenge due to the different physical properties of the two materials. All conventional joining options, such as bonds using adhesives or rivets, have their disadvantages — adhesives need time to harden, which delays further processing, and plastics can be easily damaged during riveting. Furthermore, both adhesive bonding and riveting require additional materials that increase production costs.