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Negotiating the Steering Control Authority within Haptic Shared Control Framework

University of North Carolina Charlotte-Vahid Izadi, Amir H. Ghasemi, Pouria Karimi Shahri
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-1031
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
Communication and cooperation among team members can be enhanced significantly with physical interaction. Successful collaboration requires the integration of the individual partners' intentions into a shared action plan, which may involve a continuous negotiation of intentions and roles. This project aims to explore the underlying process of intention integration and develop models for consensus reaching in a haptic shared control framework. We pay particular attention to the role of impedance modulation as a mechanism for negotiation of intentions across the physical or haptic channel. We present an optimal control-based methodology for an automation system to modulate its impedance to either gain or yield the authority to the human driver.
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Virtual Method for Simulating Driveline Launch Shudder for Solid Axle Suspension Architecture Vehicles

FCA Engineering India Pvt., Ltd.-Dhanasekar Venkatesan
FCA US LLC-Abhishek Paul, Kevin Thomson
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-1271
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
Driveline launch shudder is a second-order vibration phenomenon excited by the driveline system in vehicles. It is experienced as low frequency tactile vibrations at the vehicle seat track and is further deteriorated by a high torque demand from the engine. These vibrations are unwanted and affect the vehicle ride quality. A virtual method has been developed in ADAMS/Car to simulate the driveline launch shudder event for solid axle suspension architecture vehicles. Detailed modeling of the full vehicle system with appropriate boundary conditions has been presented. The simulated driveline launch shudder event has been quantified in the form of axle windup and accelerations at the driveline pinion, center bearing and seat track locations. A physical test correlation case study has been performed to validate the developed virtual method. This virtual method is also successfully applied to provide a driveline launch shudder mitigation enabler to improve vehicle ride performance.
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Virtual Switches and Indicators in Automotive Displays

General Motors LLC-Scott Rush
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-1362
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
This paper presents recent advances in automotive microprocessor, operating system, and supporting software technology that supports regulatory and/or functional safety graphics within vehicle cockpit displays. These graphics include “virtual switches” that replace physical switches in the vehicle, as well as “virtual indicators” that replace physical indicator lights. We discuss the functional safety design process and impacts to software and hardware architecture as well as the software design methods to implement End-To-End [E2E] network protection between different ECUs and software processes. We also describe hardware monitoring requirements within the display panel, backlighting, and touch screen and examine an example system design to illustrate the concepts.
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Researchers Develop Ultra-Thin, Ultra-Flexible Electronic Material

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-36275
Published 2020-03-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Researchers have developed an ultra-thin, ultra-flexible electronic material that could be printed and rolled out like newspaper. The material could be used for the touch-screens of the future. The touch-responsive technology is 100 times thinner than existing touchscreen materials and so pliable it can be rolled up like a tube.

Skin-Like Sensors Bring a Human Touch to Wearable Tech

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-36011
Published 2020-02-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

University of Toronto engineering researchers have developed a super stretchy, transparent, and self-powering sensor that records the complex sensations of human skin. Dubbed artificial ionic skin — or AISkin for short — the researchers believe the innovative properties of AISkin could lead to future advancements in wearable electronics, personal health care and robotics.

Electronic Skin for Haptic Interfaces Is Light, Tight, and Battery Free

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-36024
Published 2020-02-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

A system of “electronic skin-integrated haptic interfaces” jointly developed by City University of Hong Kong (CityU) and other academic institutions can help users of prosthesis to feel the surrounding environment.

Biologically Inspired Artificial Skin Improves Sensory Ability of Robots

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35611
Published 2019-12-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Inspired by human skin, a system was developed that combines artificial skin with control algorithms. The system was used to create the first autonomous humanoid robot with full-body artificial skin.

Engineered Solutions for Enclosure Sealing and Insulation

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35668
Published 2019-12-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

In the aerospace and defense industries, enclosure sealing and insulation needs to meet challenging and complex requirements. For example, the EMI gaskets that are used in military touchscreens must shield sensitive electronics from electromagnetic interference (EMI) while providing electrical conductivity and ensuring environmental sealing. These enclosure gaskets must also cushion the unit from mechanical shock and avoid interfering with the display's touch function.

VR Helps Amputees ‘Feel’ Prosthetic Limbs

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35634
Published 2019-12-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Scientists have shown that amputees can actually be convinced that the prosthetic hand belongs to their own body. They do this by going beyond the “seeing is believing” idiom based on established research on how the brain identifies what belongs to its own body. Instead of using the sense of sight alone, they used an astute combination of two senses: sight and touch.

Artificial Skin Provides Haptic Feedback

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35616
Published 2019-12-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Technology capable of replicating the sense of touch — also known as haptic feedback — can greatly enhance human-computer and human-robot interfaces for applications such as medical rehabilitation and virtual reality. A soft artificial skin was developed that provides haptic feedback and, using a self-sensing mechanism, has the potential to instantaneously adapt to a wearer's movements.