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How Can Active Exhaust Systems Contribute to the Reduction of CO2 Emission and Comply with Future Pass-by Noise Limits?

Eberspaecher Exhaust Technology GmbH-Jan Krueger, Peter Wink, Maike Werner
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-1534
To be published on 2020-06-03 by SAE International in United States
The pass-by noise limits of passenger vehicles according to ISO 362 / R51.3 will be further reduced by 2 dB in 2024 in Europe. Since the pass-by noise is substantially influenced by exhaust noise, the effort for the exhaust system needs to be increased. This results in systems with larger mufflers or higher backpressure. However, the more stringent CO2-emission targets require ever more efficient powertrains, which calls for rather lower backpressure to optimize the engine design. This paper describes, how compact active exhaust lines can support a design for low backpressure and high acoustic attenuation at the same time. For two passenger vehicle with gasoline engines, active exhaust lines are investigated in detail and the results are compared to the series production exhaust lines. Thus, in one exemplary case, the pass-by noise of a limousine could be reduced from 70 dB(A) to 68 dB(A) without any change in the vehicle design except the improved exhaust system.
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A Case Study on Reducing the Fuel Pulse Noise from Gasoline Engine Injectors

FCA US LLC-Weiguo Zhang, Toon Tan, John Malicki, Glenn Whitehead
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-1276
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
Vehicle NVH performance is a very important consideration for vehicle buyers in the marketplace. There are many noise sources from the fuel system to generate noise in a vehicle. Among them, the pressure pulsations due to the rapid opening and closing of gasoline engine injectors can cause undesirable fuel pulse noise inside the vehicle cabin. As the pressure pulsation propagates in the fuel supply line toward to rear end of the vehicle, the pressure energy is transferred from fuel lines to the vehicle underbody through clips and into the passenger compartment. It is crucial to attenuate the pressure pulsation inside the fuel line to reduce the fuel pulse noise. In this paper, a case study on developing an effective countermeasure to reduce the objectionable fuel pulse noise of a V8 gasoline injection system is presented. First, the initial interior noise of a prototype vehicle was tested and the objectionable fuel pulse noise was exhibited. The problem frequency ranges with pulse and ticking noise content were identified. Several test iterations on root causing analysis and countermeasures…
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Impact of fuel octane quality on various advanced vehicle technologies

Shell Global Solutions (Deutschland)-Caroline Magdalene Zinser, Patrick Haenel
Shell Global Solutions (UK)-Alastair Smith
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-0619
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
Fuel with higher octane content is playing a key role in optimising engine performance by allowing a more optimal spark timing which leads to increased engine efficiency and lower CO2 emissions. In a previous study the impact of octane was investigated with a vehicle fleet of 20 vehicles using market representative fuels, varying from RON 91 to 100. The resulting data showed a clear performance and acceleration benefit when higher RON fuel was used. In this follow-up study 10 more vehicles were added to the database. The vehicle fleet was extended to be more representative of Asian markets, thus broadening the geographical relevance of the database, as well as adding vehicles with newer technologies such as boosted down-sized direct injection engines, or higher compression ratio engines. Eight different fuel combinations varying in RON were tested, representing standard gasoline and premium gasoline in different markets around the world. The new results augment our previously published octane study and result in a vehicle fleet dataset comprising 30 cars from 18 different automotive manufactures. Two key metrics were…
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Impact of Engine Oil Detergent on Low Speed Pre-Ignition (LSPI) and Fuel Economy Performance

Afton Chemical Corp.-Ashutosh Gupta, Mark Devlin
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-1424
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
Low Speed Pre-Ignition (LSPI), also referred to as Stochastic Pre-Ignition (SPI), Superknock or Megaknock is an undesirable combustion phenomenon that limits the fuel economy, drivability, emissions and durability performance of modern turbocharged gasoline engines. Numerous studies have previously reported that the frequency of LSPI is sensitive to engine oil composition. One of these drivers is the concentration of Calcium, which is usually delivered in the form of a detergent in the additive package. Switching to completely all-Magnesium detergent and/or severely limiting the concentration of Ca in the engine oil have recently been proposed as potential means to reduce LSPI. In this work, we evaluate the impact of detergent type on LSPI performance as well as on other performance that the modern engine oil needs to deliver. Particularly the impact of detergent type on Fuel Economy performance is evaluated. To ensure a rigorous and high precision measurement of the impact of engine oil on fuel economy, representative of real-world conditions, under well-controlled conditions, the ASTM D8114 test (Sequence VIE) was used to quantify fuel economy performance…
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Analytical approach to characterize the effect of engine control parameters and fuel properties on ACI operation in a GDI engine

Argonne National Laboratory-Johannes Rohwer, Ashish Shah, Toby Rockstroh
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-1141
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
Advanced compression ignition (ACI) operation in gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines is a promising concept to reduce fuel consumption and emissions at part load conditions. However, combustion phasing control and the limited operating range in ACI mode are a perennial challenge. In this study the combined impact of fuel properties and engine control strategies are investigated. A design of experiments method was implemented using a three level orthogonal array to determine the sensitivity of five engine control parameters on four engine response variables under low load ACI operation for three 98 RON gasoline fuels, exhibiting disparate chemical composition. Furthermore, the thermodynamic state of the compression histories was studied with the aid of the pressure-temperature framework and correlations were drawn to analogous HCCI experiments conducted in an instrumented CFR engine. Due to the compression ratio constraints imposed by knock limited SI operation, considerable intake temperature heating was required resulting in advanced compression ignition mode resulting in the intermediate to high temperature autoignition regime. The olefin containing fuel was found to require the least amount of intake…
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Characteristics of Auto-ignition for Lubricants and Lubricant/Gasoline based on An Innovative Single Droplet Combustion System

Tongji University-Yang Yu, Kaifeng Pan, Jun Deng, Zongjie Hu, Wei Xie, Zhijun Wu, Liguang Li
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-1428
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
Due to the advantages of low weight, low emission and good fuel economy, downsized turbocharged gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines are widely-applied nowadays. However, Low-Speed Pre-Ignition (LSPI) phenomenon observed in these engines restricts their improvement of performance. Some researchers have shown that auto-ignition of lubricant in the combustion chamber has a great effect on the LSPI frequency. To study the auto-ignition characteristics of lubricant, an innovative single droplet auto-ignition measurement system for lubricant and its mixture is designed and developed, with better accuracy and effectiveness. The experiments are carried out by hanging lubricant droplets on the thermocouple node under active thermo-atmosphere provided by a small Dibble burner. The auto-ignition process of lubricant droplets is recorded by a high-speed camera. Influences of different base oil types, viscosities, calcium contents, initial droplet diameters, co-flow speeds, new oil, used oil and blending ratios of lubricant and gasoline on the ignition delay time of droplets are investigated at different droplet temperatures. The co-flow field temperature varies from 823K to 1323K. Equivalent diameters of droplets, 0.99mm, 1.24mm and 1.63mm, generated…
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Numerical Parametric Study of a Six-Stroke Gasoline Compression Ignition (GCI) Engine Combustion- Part II

Hyundai Motor Co.-Kyoung-Pyo Ha, Hyeon Woo Kim
Michigan Technological University-Oudumbar Rajput, Youngchul Ra
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-0780
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
In order to extend the operability limit of the gasoline compression ignition (GCI) engine, as an avenue for low temperature combustion (LTC) regime, the effects of parametric variations of engine operating conditions on the performance of six-stroke GCI (6S-GCI) engine cycle are numerically investigated, using an in-house 3D CFD code coupled with high-fidelity physical sub-models along with the Chemkin library. The combustion and emissions were calculated using a skeletal chemical kinetics mechanism for a 14-component gasoline surrogate fuel. Authors' previous study highlighted the effects of the variation of injection timing and split ratio on the overall performance of the 6S-GCI engine and the unique mixing-controlled burning mode of the charge mixtures during the two additional strokes. As a continuing effort, the present study details the parametric studies of initial gas temperature, boost pressure, fuel injection pressure, compression ratio, and EGR ratio. The focus of this paper is on the impact of these parameters on the performance of the two additional strokes of the 6S-GCI cycle such that the extent of controllability of ignition, combustion, and…
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Onboard Ethanol-Gasoline Separation System for Octane-on-Demand Vehicle

Honda R&D Co., Ltd.-Hiroshi Chishima, Daiko Tsutsumi, Toru Kitamura
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-0350
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
Bio-ethanol is being used worldwide as an alternative fuel because of CO2 emission reduction and energy sustainability. It is common knowledge that ethanol has an advantage of high anti-knock quality. It is also well known that enhancement of both fuel economy and high load performance for general gasoline engines are limited by knocking. In order to increase anti-knock performance, a fuel system was developed to separate ethanol blended gasoline fuel into high-octane number fuel (high-concentration ethanol fuel) and low-octane number fuel (low-concentration ethanol fuel) on a vehicle. The onboard fuel separation system, installed in the fuel tank, mainly consists of a pervaporation membrane module, a fuel supply pump for the membrane, heat exchangers for fuel heating, a condenser for the permeated fuel vapor and a vacuum pump to control the pressure on the permeation side. Vapor that was not condensed at the condenser is supplied to the engine through a canister purge line. In this study, it was revealed that the onboard fuel separation system has controllability sufficient for use in automobiles by evaluating the…
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Development of a Burner-Based Test System to Produce Controllable Particulate Emissions for Evaluation of Gasoline Particulate Filters

Southwest Research Institute-Nishant Thakral, Vinay Premnath, Imad Khalek, Scott Eakle
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-0389
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
Gasoline Direct Injection (GDI) engines have been widely adopted by manufacturers in the light-duty market due to their fuel economy benefits. However, several studies have shown that GDI engines have higher levels of particulate matter (PM) emissions relative to Port Fuel Injected (PFI) engines and diesel engines equipped with optimally functioning Diesel Particulate Filters (DPF). With stringent particle number regulations (PN) implemented in both the European Union and China, Gasoline Particulate Filters (GPF) are expected to be widely utilized to control particulate emissions. Currently, evaluating GPF technologies on a vehicle can be challenging due to a limited number of commercially available vehicles that are available, as well as the costs associated with vehicle procurement and evaluations utilizing a chassis dynamometer facility. To address these challenges, a gasoline fueled burner-based technology was retrofitted with unique hardware to replicate the engine-out emissions profiles observed with GDI applications. In the absence of a suitable vehicle, using a burner-based technology can prove to be a cost-efficient solution for rapid screening of various GPFs. This manuscript details the development of…
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Understanding Charging Flexibility of Shared Autonomous Electric Vehicle Fleets

National Renewable Energy Laboratory-Matthew Moniot, Yanbo Ge, Nicholas Reinicke, Alex Schroeder
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-0941
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
The combined anticipated trends of vehicle sharing, autonomous control, and powertrain electrification are poised to disrupt the current paradigm of predominately gasoline vehicles with low levels of utilization. Shared, autonomous, electric vehicle (SAEV) fleets, which encompass all three of these trends, have garnered significant interest among the research community due to the opportunity for low-cost mobility with congestion and emissions reductions. This paper explores the charging loads demanded by SAEV fleets in response to servicing personal light-duty vehicle travel demand in four major United States metropolitan areas: Detroit, Austin, Washington DC, and Miami. A coordinated charging model is introduced which minimizes fleet charging costs and corresponding plant emissions in response to different renewable energy penetration rates and shares of personal trip demand served (between 1% and 25%). The relationship between trip demand by time of day, electricity price by time of day, and SAEV fleet size versus overall charging flexibility is explored for each city. SAEV results are presented across various scenarios assuming fleetwide attempts to minimize charging costs while still constrained by offering adequate…