Your Selections

Fluids and secretions
Show Only

Collections

File Formats

Content Types

Dates

Sectors

Topics

Authors

Publishers

Affiliations

Committees

Events

Magazine

Microneedles Extract Fluid for Wearable Sensors

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-34916
Published 2019-08-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Interstitial fluid is clear, colorless, and similar to blood plasma. Continual sampling of important biomarkers in interstitial fluid could help monitor and diagnose many diseases and disorders. These markers include electrolytes — salts such as potassium and sodium that get out of balance during dehydration; glucose, a sugar that diabetics need to monitor constantly; and lactate, a potential marker of physical exhaustion or life-threatening sepsis.

Surgeons Use Augmented Reality to Reconnect Blood Vessels

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-34925
Published 2019-08-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Following severe trauma, patients may have tissue damage or open wounds that require reconstructive surgery using fasciocutaneous flaps. These flaps of tissue, which are taken from elsewhere on the body and include the skin and blood vessels, are used to cover the wound and enable it to close and heal properly. A vital step in the process is connecting the blood vessels of the new tissue with those at the site of the wound, so oxygenated blood can reach the new tissue and keep it alive.

Technique for 3D-Printing of Replacement Organs

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-34896
Published 2019-08-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Bioengineers have cleared a major hurdle on the path to 3D-printing replacement organs with a new technique for bioprinting tissues. It allows scientists to create entangled vascular networks that mimic the body's natural passageways for blood, air, lymph, and other vital fluids.

Endovascular Variable Aortic Control Catheter

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-34900
Published 2019-08-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

The Air Force has developed improved devices for hemostatic management of patients with life-threatening blood loss from an arterial wound or surgery. Current aortic occlusion devices successfully stem aortic blood loss, but result in hypoxia below the occlusion device. These devices, by blocking blood flow and oxygen delivery, severely limit the amount of time that such resuscitative measures can be taken before other medical complications arise.

Textile Cools or Insulates Automatically

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-34915
Published 2019-08-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Researchers have created a fabric that automatically regulates the amount of heat that passes through, depending on conditions; for example, when conditions are warm and moist — such as those of a sweating body on a summer day — the fabric allows infrared radiation (radiant heat) to pass through. When conditions become cooler and drier, the fabric reduces the heat that escapes. Infrared radiation is a primary way the body releases heat and is the focus of this new technology.

Noninvasive Device Tests Sweat Continuously for Hours

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-34735
Published 2019-07-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

A continuous-testing device was developed that samples sweat as effectively as blood but in a noninvasive way and over many hours. After examining the use of saliva, tears, and interstitial fluid, researchers concluded that sweat holds the most promise for noninvasive testing because it provides similar information as blood and its secretion rate can be controlled and measured.

New Technique Tests for Viral Infections

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-34756
Published 2019-07-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Currently, most U.S. medical offices and hospitals use the ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) test to determine whether or not a person has a viral infection. It’s a common test but ELISA’s sensitivity is relatively low, so clinicians need a fairly high number of antibodies in a person’s blood to get a positive test result. It also often takes seven to 10 days after an infection for the test to register.

Spotting Minute Amounts of Disease in the Bloodstream

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-34586
Published 2019-06-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

The difficulty in spotting minute amounts of disease circulating in the bloodstream has proven a stumbling block in the detection and treatment of cancers that advance stealthily with few symptoms. With a novel electrochemical biosensing device that identifies the tiniest signals these biomarkers emit, a pair of NJIT inventors are hoping to bridge this gap. There could therefore be a simple, inexpensive test performed at a regular patient visit in the absence of specific symptoms to screen for some of the more silent, deadly cancers — to have a nanotechnology-enhanced biochip to detect cancers, malaria, and viral diseases such as pneumonia early in their progression, with a pin prick blood test.

Soft Tissue Substitute Offers Fewer Side Effects

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-34553
Published 2019-06-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Researchers have invented a synthetic soft tissue substitute that is well tolerated and encourages the growth of soft tissue and blood vessels. This new material retains its shape without being too dense, overcoming challenges with current tissue fillers that tend to be either too soft or not porous enough to let cells move in and start regrowing tissue.

Vascular Injury Shunt

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-34597
Published 2019-06-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Extremity vascular injury results in bleeding and lack of blood flow beyond the site of vessel disruption (ischemia). Priorities when this occurs include hemorrhage control, management of life-threatening injuries, and restoration of flow to the extremity. While definitive vessel repair is optimal, life-threatening injuries often prohibit this option. Alternatively, a temporary vascular shunt (a small-caliber hollow plastic tube) may be placed in the uninjured segments of vessel above and below the disruption to restore blood flow until conditions improve, and the shunt can be removed and repair performed.