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Human Health Risk Assessment of Space Radiation

University of Pittsburgh-Ashmita Rajkumar
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-0020
To be published on 2020-03-10 by SAE International in United States
Mars has been the topic of colonization and discovery for the last few decades but there have been hindrances in implementing the mission. This focus on Mars colonization has only deepened after the discovery of water on its surface. The discovery of water on Mars has led researchers to believe that its sustainability of life is higher than any other uncolonized planet. Although, life can survive on Mars, it is highly unethical to send communities to Mars without acknowledging the risks, especially those concerning the well being of humans. The risks of living on Mars are slowly unraveling through extensive research, but it is evident that certain health care measures must be taken in order to prevent potentially fatal conditions. One of the biggest problems is health concerns that astronauts face after returning from Mars. Health problems in space have been increasingly difficult to deal with because of the lasting circumstances that astronauts suffer upon returning back to Earth. As a result of these issues, NASA has delayed its Mars mission to circa 2028. Another…

Implantable Cancer Traps Could Provide Earlier Diagnosis, Help Monitor Treatment

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35628
Published 2019-12-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Invasive procedures to biopsy tissue from cancer-tainted organs could be replaced by simply taking samples from a tiny “decoy” implanted just beneath the skin, University of Michigan researchers have demonstrated in mice.

Prototype Smartphone App Can Help Parents Detect Early Signs of Eye Disorders in Children

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35622
Published 2019-12-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

A Baylor University researcher’s prototype smartphone app — designed to help parents detect early signs of various eye diseases in their children such as retinoblastoma, an aggressive pediatric eye cancer — has passed its first big test.

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Development of Low Cost Lifesaving System for Automotive Vehicles during Road Accidents

Tata Technologies, Ltd.-Sachin Madhukarrao Pajgade, Aashish Bhargava
  • Technical Paper
  • 2019-28-2460
Published 2019-11-21 by SAE International in United States
Vehicular accidents are life-threatening and result in fatal casualties in developing country such as India. According to estimates, traffic accidents kill more people in India than diseases like Cancer and AIDS. More than 150,000 people are killed every year in traffic accidents in India, which works out to 400 fatalities a day, far higher than developed auto markets like the U.S., which had logged about 40,000 deaths in 2016. The World Health Organization estimates road accidents cost most countries about 3 per cent of their gross domestic product.India being the fastest growing economy will be the world’s third-largest car market after China and the U.S. by 2020, according to automobile researchers.According to research study most of death cause due to not getting help on time to the injured person. Research has proven that if injured person is not found any option of help then they also lose the power to fight such critical situation due to psychological effect. When vehicle met accident, people are not getting on time support, this delay is the major cause…
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Electronic Nose Can Sniff Out Which Lung Cancer Patients Will Respond to Immunotherapy

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35495
Published 2019-11-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

European Society for Medical Oncology Lugano, Switzerland

5 Ws of the E-Tattoo for Heart Monitoring

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35434
Published 2019-11-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Anyone suffering from heart disease or other heart ailments that require regular heart monitoring. The new wearable technology could make heart health monitoring easier and more accurate than existing electrocardiograph machines — a technology that has changed little in almost a century.

Scientists Create Pancreas on a Chip

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35497
Published 2019-11-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

By combining two powerful technologies, scientists are taking diabetes research to a whole new level. In a study led by Harvard University’s Kevin Kit Parker and published in the journal Lab on a Chip, microfluidics and human, insulin-producing beta cells have been integrated in an islet-on-a-chip. The new device makes it easier for scientists to screen insulin-producing cells before transplanting them into a patient, test insulin-stimulating compounds, and study the fundamental biology of diabetes.

Miniaturizing Medical Imaging, Sensing Technology

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35501
Published 2019-11-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Scientists have used a microchip to map the back of the eye for disease diagnosis. This is the first time that technical obstacles have been overcome to fabricate a miniature device able to capture high-quality images.

Camera Enables Surgeons to More Easily Identify Cancerous Tissue

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35429
Published 2019-11-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Many surgeons rely on sight and touch to find cancerous tissue during surgery. Large hospitals or cancer treatment centers may also use experimental near-infrared fluorescent agents that bind to tumors so surgeons can see them on specialized displays. These machines are costly, making them difficult for smaller hospitals to procure. They also are very large, making them difficult to fit into an operating suite and integrate smoothly into surgery, and they require the lights to be dimmed so the instruments can pick up the weak fluorescent signal, making it difficult for the surgeons to see.

Using Simulation to Evaluate Laser Treatment Methods for Eye Tumors

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35496
Published 2019-11-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Computational methods are not widely used in practical medicine, mainly because it is difficult to model specific medical procedures and their effects on the human organism and methods of treatment tend to be conservative. However, new methods to treat cancer using radiology and laser radiation are emerging at a rapid rate.