Your Selections

Diesel engine lubricants
Show Only

Collections

File Formats

Content Types

Dates

Sectors

Topics

Authors

Publishers

Affiliations

Committees

Events

Magazine

   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

ERRATUM

SAE International Journal of Fuels and Lubricants

Ford Motor Company, USA-James C. Ball, James E. Anderson, Dairene Uy, Timothy J. Wallington
Michigan State University, USA-Jacob A. Duckworth
  • Journal Article
  • 04-12-03-0015.1
Published 2020-01-29 by SAE International in United States
Erratum
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Identifying the limitations of the Hot Tube test as a predictor of lubricant performance in small engine applications

The Lubrizol Corporation-Jason Hanthorn, Jessica Schmiesing
  • Technical Paper
  • 2019-32-0510
Published 2020-01-24 by Society of Automotive Engineers of Japan in Japan
The Hot Tube Test is a bench test commonly used by OEMs, Oil Marketers and Lubricant Additive manufacturers within the Small Engines industry. The test uses a glass tube heated in an aluminum block to gauge the degree of lacquer formation when a lubricant is subjected to high temperatures. This test was first published by engineers at Komatsu Ltd. (hence KHT) in 1984 to predict lubricant effects on diesel engine scuffing in response to a field issue where bulldozers were suffering from piston scuffing failures [1]. Nearly 35 years after its development the KHT is still widely used to screen lubricant performance in motorcycle, power tool and recreational marine applications as a predictor of high-temperature piston cleanliness - a far cry from the original intended performance predictor of the test. In this paper we set out to highlight the shortcomings of the KHT as well as to identify areas where it may still be a useful screening tool as it pertains to motorcycle applications.
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

A study of Measurement for Oil Film at the Bearing of the Small End of Diesel Engine Connecting Rod

SAE International Journal of Advances and Current Practices in Mobility

Tokyo City University-Shotaro Suzuki, Shota Yamada, Akemi Ito
  • Journal Article
  • 2019-01-2332
Published 2019-12-19 by SAE International in United States
Downsizing and slowing down of engine speed reduce mechanical losses and improve fuel economy. However, they exacerbate lubrication condition. The oil film thickness of the bearing of the small end of the connecting rod, which was one of the sliding surfaces with the severest lubrication condition in a diesel engine, was measured in this study to clarify the lubrication condition. Optical fibers were embedded in the bearing, and oil film was measured by means of the laser induced fluorescence method. It was found that oil film thickness was affected combustion gas pressure and distortion of the piston pin.
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Oxidation of Soybean Biodiesel Fuel in Diesel Engine Oils

SAE International Journal of Fuels and Lubricants

Ford Motor Company, USA-James C. Ball, James E. Anderson, Dairene Uy, Timothy J. Wallington
Michigan State University, USA-Jacob A. Duckworth
  • Journal Article
  • 04-12-03-0015
Published 2019-12-05 by SAE International in United States
During diesel engine operation, some fuel is entrained in engine oil, particularly as a consequence of strategies to regenerate NOx traps or particle filters. This “fuel dilution” of oil can adversely affect engine oil properties and performance. Compared to diesel fuel, biodiesel is more prone to fuel dilution and more susceptible to oxidation. Oxidation stability experiments were conducted at 160°C using a modified Rapid Small-Scale Oxidation Test (RSSOT) and a Rancimat instrument with 0, 5, 10, and 20 wt% biodiesel in four fully formulated engine oils, two partially formulated engine oils, and two base oils. These experiments showed decreasing oxidation stability with increasing biodiesel content. An exception was noted with the least stable oils (two base oils and one engine oil) in which 5 wt% biodiesel improved the oxidation stability relative to oil without biodiesel. Experiments with biodiesel distillation fractions identified this stability enhancement within the least volatile biodiesel fraction, consistent with natural antioxidants in the biodiesel. Omission of two engine oil additives, antioxidants and zinc dialkyldithiophosphates (ZDDP), led to an unexpected increase in oxidation…
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Farm Tractor Efficiency Gains through Optimized Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Oils

Nebraska Tractor Test Laboratory-Roger Hoy, Justin Geyer, Douglas Triplett
The Lubrizol Corp.-Adam Stackpole, Alexander Michlberger, Paul Mardula
Published 2018-09-10 by SAE International in United States
Modern agriculture has evolved dramatically over the past half century. To be profitable, farms need to significantly increase their crop yields, and thus there are amplified demands on farming equipment. Equipment duty cycles have been raised in scope and duration, as the required output of the agricultural industry to sustain a growing population has stimulated the need for further advances in effective productivity gains on the farm. The mainstay mechanical assistant to the farmer, the tractor, has also evolved with the changes in modern agriculture to meet the requirements of these newer tasks. Larger, more capable vehicles have been introduced to help farmers efficiently meet these demands. At the same time, the current generation of tractor diesel engine lubricants has facilitated high levels of performance in the agricultural equipment market for many years. This is a testament to the role modern lubricants play in productivity in such a critical industry. With a growing global population to feed, and government regulations requiring reduced emissions for off-highway (OH) equipment, it is important to become more efficient in…
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Optimization of Heavy Duty Diesel Engine Lubricant and Coolant Pumps for Parasitic Loss Reduction

Southwest Research Institute-Daniel Christopher Bitsis, Jason Miwa
Published 2018-04-03 by SAE International in United States
As fuel economy becomes increasingly important in all markets, complete engine system optimization is required to meet future standards. In many applications, it is difficult to realize the optimum coolant or lubricant pump without first evaluating different sets of engine hardware and iterating on the flow and pressure requirements. For this study, a Heavy Duty Diesel (HDD) engine was run in a dynamometer test cell with full variability of the production coolant and lubricant pumps. Two test stands were developed to allow the engine coolant and lubricant pumps to be fully mapped during engine operation. The pumps were removed from the engine and powered by electric motors with inline torque meters. Each fluid circuit was instrumented with volume flow meters and pressure measurements at multiple locations. After development of the pump stands, research efforts were focused on hardware changes to reduce coolant and lubricant flow requirements of the HDD engine. As engine hardware changes were made to reduce coolant and lubricant requirements, the fuel economy benefit was immediately realized. Several hardware sets are discussed along…
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Fault Detection and Diagnosis of Diesel Engine Lubrication System Performance Degradation Faults based on PSO-SVM

Beijing Institute of Technology-Yingmin Wang, Tao Cui, Fujun Zhang, Sufei Wang, Hongli Gao
Published 2017-10-08 by SAE International in United States
Considering the randomness and instability of the oil pressure in the lubrication system, a new approach for fault detection and diagnosis of diesel engine lubrication system based on support vector machine optimized by particle swarm optimization (PSO-SVM) model and centroid location algorithm has been proposed. Firstly, PSO algorithm is chosen to determine the optimum parameters of SVM, to avoid the blindness of choosing parameters. It can improve the prediction accuracy of the model. The results show that the classify accuracy of PSO-SVM is improved compared with SVM in which parameters are set according to experience. Then, the support vector machine classification interface is fitted to a curve, and the boundary conditions of fault diagnosis are obtained. Finally, diagnose algorithm is achieved through analyzing the centroid movement of features. According to Performance degradation data, degenerate trajectory model is established based on centroid location. And normal faults and performance degradation faults of diesel engine lubrication system are diagnosed. Results show that classification accuracy of the proposed PSO-SVM model achieved is 95.06% and 97.04% in two verify samples,…
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Engine Oil Performance and Engine Service Classification (Other than “Energy Conserving”)

Fuels and Lubricants TC 1 Engine Lubrication
  • Ground Vehicle Standard
  • J183_201611
  • Historical
Published 2016-11-22 by SAE International in United States
This SAE Standard outlines the engine oil performance categories and classifications developed through the efforts of the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers (Alliance), American Petroleum Institute (API), the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), the Engine Manufacturers Association (EMA), International Lubricant Specification Advisory Committee (ILSAC) and SAE. The verbal descriptions by API and ASTM, along with prescribed test methods and limits are shown for active categories in Table 1 and obsolete categories in Table A1. Appendix A is a historical documentation of the obsolete categories. For purposes of this document, active categories are defined as those (a) for which the required test equipment and test support materials, including reference engine oils and reference fuels, are readily available, (b) for which ASTM or the test developer monitors precision for all tests, and (c) which are currently available for licensing by API EOLCS. The current processes for initiating new classifications were developed through the cooperative efforts of the Alliance, API, ASTM, EMA, ILSAC, and SAE. New ILSAC classifications are developed using the procedure defined in API 1509…
This content contains downloadable datasets
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Next Generation Diblock Viscosity Modifier for Heavy Duty Diesel Engine Lubricants

Infineum USA LP-Xiaobo Shen, Rajiv Taribagil, Stuart Briggs, Isabella Goldmints
Published 2016-10-17 by SAE International in United States
An unprecedented global focus on the environment and greenhouse gases has driven recent government regulations on automotive emissions across the globe. To achieve this improvement, Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) have advocated a progressive move towards the use of low viscosity grade oils. However, the use of lower viscosity grades should not compromise engine durability or wear protection. Viscosity modifiers (VM) - polymeric additive components used to tailor the lubricant’s viscometric properties - have been viewed as a key enabler for achieving the desirable balance between fuel economy and engine durability performance. Self-assembling diblock copolymers represent a unique class of VMs, which deliver superior shear stability due to their tunable association/dissociation in the lubricating oil. Superior shear stability ensures that the oil viscosity and its ability to offer reliable engine protection from wear is retained over the life of the oil in the engine. In addition, some polystyrene containing diblock VMs can help to boost soot dispersancy due to polystyrene block adsorption onto the soot surface. This additional feature helps in preventing soot aggregation, thereby maintaining…
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Influence of Biodiesel Fuel on Lubricant Oil Oxidative Degradation

The Univ. of Shiga Prefecture-Kotaro Mori, Naoya Sugimoto, Koji Yamane, Kiyoshi Kawasaki
Published 2015-09-01 by SAE International in United States
Biodiesel fuel can be used in diesel engines with no major modification, but there are some issues derived from the properties of the fuel. Engine oil dilution is a major issue caused by lower volatility and low oxidation stability in biodiesel fuel. The purpose of this study was to clarify the influence of oil dilution by biodiesel fuel on oxidative degradation characteristics, including the acid value (AV), carbon residue (CR), and kinematic viscosity of diesel engine lubricant oil. Degradation assessment was carried out on lubricant oil during operation of a small diesel engine generator, as well as an oxidative acceleration test using a mixture of biodiesel and lubricant oil. It was found that the kinematic viscosity decreased to 23% from its initial value, the dilution rate increased almost linearly, amounting to 2.8 mass-% after 102 hours of engine operation, and deterioration was greater in JASO DH-1 grade lubricant oil mixed with biodiesel than in JASO DH-2.
Annotation ability available