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TSCI with Wet Ethanol: An Investigation of the Effects of Injection Strategy on a Diesel Engine Architecture

SUNY-Stonybrook-Ziming Yan
Stony Brook University-Brian Gainey, James Gohn, Mozhgan Rahimi Boldaji, Benjamin Lawler
Published 2019-04-02 by SAE International in United States
Thermally Stratified Compressions Ignition (TSCI) is a new advanced, low temperature combustion concept that aims to control the thermal stratification in the cylinder in order to control the heat release process in a lean, compression-ignition combustion mode. This work uses “wet ethanol”, a mixture of 80% ethanol and 20% water by mass, to increase thermal stratification beyond what naturally occurs, via evaporative cooling of a split direct injection. TSCI with wet ethanol has previously shown the potential to increase the high-load limit when compared to HCCI. The experiments conducted in this paper aim to fundamentally understand the effect that injection strategy has on the heat release process in TSCI.TSCI employs a split-injection strategy in which an injection during the intake stroke allows the majority of the fuel to premix with the air and an injection during the compression stroke introduces the desired level of thermal stratification to control the heat release rate. A single injection at -350 deg aTDC was found to be the most effective way to inject fuel during the intake stroke. The…
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Heat Treatment Precipitation-Hardening Corrosion-Resistant, Maraging, and Secondary Hardening Steel Parts

AMS F Corrosion Heat Resistant Alloys Committee
  • Aerospace Material Specification
  • AMS2759/3H
  • Current
Published 2019-01-07 by SAE International in United States
This specification, in conjunction with the general requirements for steel heat treatment covered in AMS2759, establishes the requirements for heat treatment of precipitation-hardening corrosion-resistant, maraging and secondary hardening, steel parts. Parts are defined in AMS2759. Parts made from steels other than those specified in this specification may be heat treated in accordance with the applicable requirements herein using processing temperatures, times, and other parameters recommended by the material producer unless otherwise specified by the purchaser. General ordering instructions are specified in AMS2759.
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Q&A: Dr. Patrick Hopkins, Professor, University of Virginia, Charlottesville

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-33233
Published 2018-11-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Professor Hopkins and University of Virginia colleagues — in collaboration with materials scientists at Penn State, the University of Maryland, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology — have studied a material that can dynamically regulate its thermal properties, switching back and forth between insulating and cooling based on the amount of water that is present.

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Thermodynamic Analysis of an Evaporative Inlet Air Cooled Combined Cycle for Marine Application

GIFT, Bhubaneswar-Alok Kumar Mohapatra
NIT Jamshedpur-Anupam Kumari
Published 2018-09-10 by SAE International in United States
The integration of inlet air cooling to gas turbine based power utilities is a well accepted practice as this modification to the utility delivers superior utility performance. However, application of inlet-air cooling to drive turbines and specifically to marine mobility sector is rare in literature. Marine vessels are generally propelled by diesel engines, however large marine vessels specifically cruise ships and high speed naval vessels may have requirements of higher speeds and on-board power requirements which can fulfilled by gas turbine driving the propellers while on-board power needs can be met by steam turbine power generated from gas turbine exhaust heat. Such gas-steam combined cycles have the potential to become popular for high capacity marine vessels. The choice of gas turbine based combined cycle power plant for marine vessels in comparison to diesel engine powered vessel is also superior due to lower emission from the former. Higher ambient temperatures are known to negatively affect gas turbine and hence also marine combined cycle performance. The present article discusses the prospects of using an evaporative inlet air…
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Bearings, Plain, Self-Aligning, Self-Lubricating, 300 cpm Oscillation (13 fpm), -65 to +160 °F (-54 to +71 °C), Liners Less Than 0.015 inches

ACBG Plain Bearing Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AS82819
  • Current
Published 2018-08-23 by SAE International in United States
This standard covers the requirements for spherical, self-aligning, self-lubricating, bearings which are for use in the ambient temperature range of -65 to +160 °F (-54 to +71 °C) at high cyclic speeds 300 cpm (13 fpm) for liners with a thickness less than 0.015 inch. The scope of this standard is to provide a liner system qualification procedure for helicopter sliding bearings defined and controlled by source control drawings. Once a liner system is qualified, the source-controlled bearings are further tested under application conditions. Under Department of Defense (DoD) Policies and Procedures, any qualification requirements and associated Qualified Products List (QPLs) are mandatory for DoD contracts. Any materials relating to QPLs have not been adopted by SAE and are not part of this SAE technical document.
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Bearings, Plain, Self-Aligning, Self-Lubricating, 1400 cpm (15 fpm), Oscillation, -65 to +160 °F (-54 to +71 °C)

ACBG Plain Bearing Committee
  • Aerospace Standard
  • AS83819
  • Current
Published 2018-08-23 by SAE International in United States
This standard covers the requirements for spherical, self-aligning, self-lubricating, bearings which are for use in the ambient temperature range of -65 to +160 °F (-54 to +71 °C) at high cyclic speeds 1400 cpm (15 fpm). The scope of this standard is to provide a liner system qualification procedure for helicopter sliding bearings defined and controlled by source control drawings. Once a liner system is qualified, the source-controlled bearings are further tested under application conditions. Under Department of Defense (DoD) Policies and Procedures, any qualification requirements and associated Qualified Products List (QPLs) are mandatory for DoD contracts. Any materials relating to QPLs have not been adopted by SAE and are not part of this SAE technical document.
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Steel, Corrosion and Heat-Resistant, Investment Castings 17Cr - 13Ni - 1.9Mo Solution Heat Treated

AMS F Corrosion Heat Resistant Alloys Committee
  • Aerospace Material Specification
  • AMS5360G
  • Current
Published 2018-08-15 by SAE International in United States
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant steel in the form of investment castings.
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Stress Relief of Steel Parts

AMS E Carbon and Low Alloy Steels Committee
  • Aerospace Material Specification
  • AMS2759/11A
  • Current
Published 2018-04-28 by SAE International in United States
This specification, in conjunction with the general requirements for steel heat treatment in AMS2759, establishes requirements for thermal stress relief treatments of parts manufactured from the following materials: a Carbon and low alloy steels b Tool steels c Precipitation hardening, corrosion resistant and maraging steels d Austenitic corrosion resistant steels e Martensitic corrosion resistant steels
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Heat Treatment Precipitation-Hardening Corrosion-Resistant, Maraging, and Secondary Hardening Steel Parts

AMS F Corrosion Heat Resistant Alloys Committee
  • Aerospace Material Specification
  • AMS2759/3G
  • Historical
Published 2018-04-28 by SAE International in United States
This specification, in conjunction with the general requirements for steel heat treatment covered in AMS2759, establishes the requirements for heat treatment of precipitation-hardening corrosion-resistant, maraging and secondary hardening, steel parts. Parts are defined in AMS2759. Parts made from steels other than those specified in this specification may be heat treated in accordance with the applicable requirements herein using processing temperatures, times, and other parameters recommended by the material producer unless otherwise specified by the purchaser. General ordering instructions are specified in AMS2759.
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A Hybrid Thermal Bus for Ground Vehicles Featuring Parallel Heat Transfer Pathways

SAE International Journal of Commercial Vehicles

Clemson Unversity-Shervin Shoai Naini, Junkui (Allen) Huang, Richard Miller, John R. Wagner
US Army TARDEC-Denise Rizzo, Katherine Sebeck, Scott Shurin
  • Journal Article
  • 2018-01-1111
Published 2018-04-03 by SAE International in United States
Improved propulsion system cooling remains an important challenge in the transportation industry as heat generating components, embedded in ground vehicles, trend toward higher heat fluxes and power requirements. The further minimization of the thermal management system power consumption necessitates the integration of parallel heat rejection strategies to maintain prescribed temperature limits. When properly designed, the cooling solution will offer lower noise, weight, and total volume while improving system durability, reliability, and power efficiency. This study investigates the integration of high thermal conductivity (HTC) materials, carbon fibers, and heat pipes with conventional liquid cooling to create a hybrid “thermal bus” to move the thermal energy from the heat source(s) to the ambient surroundings. The innovative design can transfer heat between the separated heat source(s) and heat sink(s) without sensitivity to gravity. A case study examines the thermal stability, heat dissipation capabilities, power requirements, and system weights for several driving cycles. Representative numerical results show that the HTC materials and carbon fibers offer moderate cooling while loop heat pipes provide significant improvements for passive cooling.
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