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Dynamic Object Map based architecture for robust CVS systems.

Hyundai Motor Group-Syed Mahmud
University of Central Florida-Rodolfo Valiente, Arash Raftari, Mahdi Zaman, Yaser Pourmohammadi Fallah
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-0084
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
Connected and Autonomous Vehicles (CAV) rely on information obtained from sensors and communication to make decisions. In a Cooperative Vehicle Safety (CVS) system, information from remote vehicles (RV) is available at the host vehicle (HV) through the wireless network. Safety applications such as crash warning algorithms use this information to estimate the RV and HV states. However, this information is uncertain and sparse due to communication losses, limitations of communication protocols in high congestion scenarios, and perception errors caused by sensor limitations. In this paper we present a novel approach to improve the robustness of the CVS systems, by proposing an architecture that divide application and information/perception subsystems. This architecture is enabled by a Dynamic Object Map (DOM) middle layer which uses the received data from HV local sensors and integrates it with the data received through wireless communication to track RVs and create a real-time dynamic map of HV’s surrounding. The architecture is validated with simulations and in a real environment using a remote vehicle emulator (RVE), which allows the joint study of the…
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Atoms Can Receive Common Communications Signals

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35986
Published 2020-02-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

A new type of sensor was developed that uses atoms to receive commonly used communications signals. Cesium atoms were used to receive digital bits (1s and 0s) in the most common communications format used in cellphones, Wi-Fi, and satellite TV. In this format, called phase shifting or phase modulation, radio signals or other electromagnetic waves are shifted relative to one another over time. The information (or data) is encoded in this modulation. The method works across a wide range of frequencies.

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Electric Vehicle Power Transfer System Using Conductive Automated Connection Devices Enclosed Pin and Socket Connection

Hybrid - EV Committee
  • Ground Vehicle Standard
  • J3105/3_202001
  • Current
Published 2020-01-20 by SAE International in United States
This document details one of the connections of the SAE J3105 document. The connections are referenced in the scope of the main document SAE J3105. SAE J3105/3 details the enclosed pin and sleeve connection. All the common requirements are defined in the main document; the current document provides the details of the connection. This document covers the main safety and interoperability relevant requirements for an electric vehicle power transfer system using a conductive automated charging device based on an enclosed pin and socket design. To allow interoperability for on-road vehicles (in particular, buses and coaches), one configuration is described in this document. Other configurations may be used for non-standard applications (for example, mining trucks or port vehicles).
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Electric Vehicle Power Transfer System Using Conductive Automated Connection Devices

Hybrid - EV Committee
  • Ground Vehicle Standard
  • J3105_202001
  • Current
Published 2020-01-20 by SAE International in United States
This document covers the general physical, electrical, functional, testing, and performance requirements for conductive power transfer, primarily for vehicles using a conductive ACD connection capable of transferring DC power. It defines conductive power transfer methods, including the infrastructure electrical contact interface, the vehicle connection interface, the electrical characteristics of the DC supply, and the communication system. It also covers the functional and dimensional requirements for the vehicle connection interface and supply equipment interface. There are also sub-documents which are identified by a SAE J3105/1, SAE J3105/2, and SAE J3105/3. These will be specific requirements for a specific interface defined in the sub-document. SAE J3105: Main document, including most requirements. ○ SAE J3105/1: Infrastructure-Mounted Cross Rail Connection ○ SAE J3105/2: Vehicle-Mounted Pantograph Connection ○ SAE J3105/3: Enclosed Pin and Socket Connection
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Electric Vehicle Power Transfer System Using Conductive Automated Connection Devices Vehicle-Mounted Pantograph (Bus-Up)

Hybrid - EV Committee
  • Ground Vehicle Standard
  • J3105/2_202001
  • Current
Published 2020-01-20 by SAE International in United States
This document details one of the connections of the SAE J3105 document. The connections are referenced in the scope of the main document SAE J3105. SAE J3105/2 details the vehicle-mounted pantograph, or the bus-up connection. All the common requirements are defined in the main document; the current document provides the details of the connection. This document covers the connection interface relevant requirements for an electric vehicle power transfer system using a conductive automated charging device based on a conventional rail vehicle pantograph design. To allow interoperability for on-road vehicles (in particular, buses and coaches), one configuration is described in this document. Other configurations may be used for non-standard applications (for example, mining trucks or port vehicles).
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SAE STANDARDS NEWS

Automotive Engineering: January/February 2020

  • Magazine Article
  • 20AUTP02_06
Published 2020-01-01 by SAE International in United States

SAE publishes On-Route Mechanized Conductive EV Charging Systems Recommended Practices

SAE International published SAE J-3105 Electric Vehicle Power Transfer System Using Conductive Automated Connection Devices Recommended Practice in January 2020. The document promotes the safe testing and performance of mechanized conductive power transfer systems. Written for buses and heavy-duty vehicles in general, SAE J-3105 encompasses the general physical, electrical, functional, testing and performance requirements for conductive power transfer primarily for vehicles using a conductive automated-charging-device (ACD) connection capable of transferring DC power.

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The Key to AV Safety is ODD

Autonomous Vehicle Engineering: January 2020

Bradley Berman
  • Magazine Article
  • 20AVEP01_08
Published 2020-01-01 by SAE International in United States

Truly safe automated driving depends on defining the exhaustive list of overlapping conditions, use cases, restrictions and scenarios an AV might encounter.

In a perfect world, an automated vehicle (AV) would be all-knowing. Its sensors, communication systems and computing power could predict every road hazard and avoid all risks. But until a wholly omniscient self-driving vehicle is a reality, there will be one burning question for AV developers and regulators - and the public: How safe is safe enough?

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Hydrogen Surface Vehicle to Station Communications Hardware and Software

Fuel Cell Standards Committee
  • Ground Vehicle Standard
  • J2799_201912
  • Current
Published 2019-12-13 by SAE International in United States
This standard specifies the communications hardware and software requirements for fueling hydrogen surface vehicles (HSV), such as fuel cell vehicles, but may also be used where appropriate, with heavy-duty vehicles (e.g., busses) and industrial trucks (e.g., forklifts) with compressed hydrogen storage. It contains a description of the communications hardware and communications protocol that may be used to refuel the HSV. The intent of this standard is to enable harmonized development and implementation of the hydrogen fueling interfaces. This standard is intended to be used in conjunction with the hydrogen fueling protocols in SAE J2601 and nozzles and receptacles conforming with SAE J2600.
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Software-Defined Analog Filters: A Paradigm Shift in Radio Filter Performance and Capability

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35665
Published 2019-12-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Among the most abundant components in all wireless system designs, analog RF filters are used to block interference from various internal and external sources. Limited spectrum divided among an ever-increasing number of users is further driving the need for these ubiquitous but in some ways anachronistic devices. Currently, interference is quite common among cellular base stations, satellite systems, radar installations, and other types of access and backhaul communications systems. Traditional filters are unable to cope with the requirements; in many cases, most often due to insufficient guard bandf. For example, in some international locales, LTE base stations and satellite receivers share the L-band frequencies. At around 3.5 GHz, 5G operators, CBRS radios, and military radars are trying to co-exist. To address this in-band interference, a new, tunable filtering technology is entering the marketplace, uniquely blending the best of both analog and digital technologies.

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Software-Defined Analog Filters: A Paradigm Shift in Radio Filter Performance and Capability

Aerospace & Defense Technology: December 2019

  • Magazine Article
  • 19AERP12_05
Published 2019-12-01 by SAE International in United States

Among the most abundant components in all wireless system designs, analog RF filters are used to block interference from various internal and external sources. Limited spectrum divided among an ever-increasing number of users is further driving the need for these ubiquitous but in some ways anachronistic devices. Currently, interference is quite common among cellular base stations, satellite systems, radar installations, and other types of access and backhaul communications systems. Traditional filters are unable to cope with the requirements; in many cases, most often due to insufficient guard bandf. For example, in some international locales, LTE base stations and satellite receivers share the L-band frequencies. At around 3.5 GHz, 5G operators, CBRS radios, and military radars are trying to co-exist. To address this in-band interference, a new, tunable filtering technology is entering the marketplace, uniquely blending the best of both analog and digital technologies.

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