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Automated 3-D Printing Machine Bed Clearing Mechanism

Kettering University-Dalton Whitten, Jason Dietrich, Matt Donar, Raghu Echempati, Colin Donar
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-1301
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
The work presented in this paper is based on the senior capstone class project undertaken by the student authors at Kettering University. The main aim of the project was to design an automated bed clearing mechanism for the Anet brand A8 3-D printer. The concept behind the idea was to allow everyone with this brand of printer to be able to print multiple prints without human interaction. The idea started out as a universal bed clearing mechanism, for most brands of 3-D printers. Upon researching into the many different styles and designs of printers, it was apparent that the designs differ too much from each other in order to create a universal product. The student team decided to aim for the most common style of 3-D printer, which the team also had a model to test the design. Due to the size of our team (number of members), they were split in to two sub-teams in order to explore two separate designs and develop the design and testing on both of the designs. Their designs…
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Digital DHRs: Automating the Last Mile of the Production Process

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-36274
Published 2020-03-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

The smart factory has been a top manufacturing initiative for years as shop floors continue to become digital, automated, and intelligent. Today, companies are investing heavily in smart manufacturing, intelligent automation, and advanced robotics. A 2019 report from PricewaterhouseCoopers and the Manufacturing Institute found that 73 percent of manufacturers planned to increase their investment in smart factory technology over the next year.1

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The Principles of Operation Framework: A Comprehensive Classification Concept for Automated Driving Functions

SAE International Journal of Connected and Automated Vehicles

Federal Highway Research Institute (BASt), Germany-Elisabeth Shi, Tom Michael Gasser, Andre Seeck
Fraunhofer-Institute for Transportation and Infrastructure Systems IVI, Germany-Rico Auerswald
  • Journal Article
  • 12-03-01-0003
Published 2020-02-18 by SAE International in United States
The levels of sustained vehicle automation, as recently updated by SAE in J3016 (status: 06/2018), have become common knowledge. They facilitate overall understanding of the issue. Sustained automation describes the shift in workload from purely human-driven vehicles to full automation. Duties of the driver are assigned to the machine as automation levels rise. Yet sustained driving automation does not cover “automated driving” as a whole. Automated driving functions operating on a nonsustained basis cannot be classified by means of levels describing continuous automation. Emergency braking, e.g., is obviously an intensive, but discontinuous, automation of a single task. It cannot be classified under the regime of sustained automation. The resulting lack of visibility of these important functions cannot satisfy - especially in the light of effect they take on traffic safety. Therefore, in order to reach a full picture of automated driving, this article proposes a comprehensive approach that can map out different characteristics as “Principles of Operation” at top level. On this basis informing and warning functions as well as functions intervening only temporarily in…
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Implementing an Aerospace Factory OF THE FUTURE

Aerospace & Defense Technology: February 2020

  • Magazine Article
  • 20AERP02_04
Published 2020-02-01 by SAE International in United States

Companies across a wide range of segments are introducing Industry 4.0 (i4.0) technology at a rapid pace, turning the next-generation vision of manufacturing - the Factory of the Future - into reality. Many of the advances in this transformation have been in highly automated industries such as vehicle manufacturing. Conversely, the aerospace industry, with its staged approach to assembling aircraft, satellites and other products, has only begun to investigate how i4.0 technologies can improve operations, throughput, quality control and cost challenges.

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Implementing an Aerospace Factory of the Future

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-36056
Published 2020-02-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Companies across a wide range of segments are introducing Industry 4.0 (i4.0) technology at a rapid pace, turning the next-generation vision of manufacturing — the Factory of the Future — into reality. Many of the advances in this transformation have been in highly automated industries such as vehicle manufacturing. Conversely, the aerospace industry, with its staged approach to assembling aircraft, satellites and other products, has only begun to investigate how i4.0 technologies can improve operations, throughput, quality control and cost challenges.

5G in Manufacturing: What’s Here and What’s to Come

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35967
Published 2020-02-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Industry 4.0 — the term that originated in Germany to describe the fourth industrial revolution of cyber-physical systems — is being closely connected today with 5G, which is often referred to as the fifth-generation mobile network. This connection allows manufacturers to further improve factory automation, human/machine interfaces, and mobility in their processes.

Valves for Pneumatic Cylinders and Actuators

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-36005
Published 2020-02-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

In the pneumatic world, valves are the equivalent of relays controlling the flow of electricity in automation systems. Instead of distributing electric power to motors, drives, and other devices, pneumatic valves distribute air to cylinders, actuators, and nozzles.

Automated Production of Advanced Materials

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-36012
Published 2020-02-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Engineers have developed an automated way to produce polymers, making it much easier to create advanced materials aimed at improving human health. The innovation is a critical step in pushing the limits for researchers who want to explore large libraries of polymers, including plastics and fibers.

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Unsettled Technology Domains in Robotics for Automation in Aerospace Manufacturing

Muelaner Engineering, Ltd.-Jody Muelaner
  • Research Report
  • EPR2019010
Published 2019-12-20 by SAE International in United States
Cost reduction and increasing production rates are driving automation of aerospace manufacturing. Articulated serial robots may replace bespoke gantry automation or human operations. Improved accuracy is key to enabling operations such as machining, additive manufacturing (AM), composite fabrication, drilling, automated program development, and inspection. New accuracy standards are needed to enable process-relevant comparisons between robotic systems.Accuracy can be improved through calibration of kinematic and joint stiffness parameters, joint output encoders, adaptive control that compensates for thermal expansion, and feedforward control that compensates for hysteresis and external loads. The impact of datuming could also be significantly reduced through modeling and optimization. Highly dynamic end effectors compensate high-frequency disturbances using inertial sensors and reaction masses. Global measurement feedback is a high-accuracy turnkey solution, but it is costly and has limited capability to compensate dynamic errors. Local measurement feedback is a mature, affordable, and highly accurate technology where the robot is required to position or align relative to some local feature. Locally clamped machine tools are an alternative approach that can utilize the flexibility of industrial robots while…
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Changing How the Aerospace Industry Makes Parts

  • Magazine Article
  • TBMG-35684
Published 2019-12-01 by Tech Briefs Media Group in United States

Technology that increases production rates and part quality, while reducing setup times and costs, is seeing a surge in demand within the aerospace sector as the commercial aircraft backlog continues to grow.