Your Selections

Fuels and Energy Sources
Electric power grid
Smart grid
Vehicle to grid (V2G)
Vehicle to vehicle (V2V)
Energy conservation
Waste heat utilization
Energy consumption
Fuel reformers
Lubricants
Crankcase lubricants
Diesel engine lubricants
Engine lubricants
Gas turbine lubricants
Gear lubricants
Lubricant additives
Lubricant contamination
Lubricant viscosity
Lubricating greases
Lubricating oils
Synthetic lubricants
Off-board energy sources
Coal
Coal gasification
Coal liquefaction
Electric power
Hydroelectric power
Nuclear energy
Solar energy
Wind power
On-board energy sources
Alternative fuels
Biofuels
Biodiesel
Dimethyl ether (DME)
Ethanol
Gasohol
Methane
Methanol
Hydrogen fuel
Natural gas
Compressed natural gas
Liquefied petroleum gas
Nuclear fuel
Vegetable oils
Aviation fuels
Jet fuel
Spacecraft fuel
Diesel fuels
Cetane
Reformulated diesel fuels
Fuel additives
Fuel cells
Fuel consumption
Fuel economy
Gasoline
Knock
Reformulated gasoline
Hybrid power
Electric hybrid power
Hydraulic and pneumatic hybrid power
Mechanical hybrid power
Hydrazines
Propellants
Liquid propellants
Solid propellants
Synthetic fuels
Show Only

Collections

File Formats

Content Types

Dates

Sectors

Topics

Authors

Publishers

Affiliations

Committees

Events

Magazine

Series

Diminishing Benefits of Federal Reformulated Gasoline (RFG) Compared to Conventional Gasoline (CG)

Denver University, USA-Gary Bishop
Desert Research Institute, USA-Steven Kent Hoekman, Amber Leland
  • Journal Article
  • 04-12-01-0001
To be published on 2019-12-20 by SAE International in United States
The Federal reformulated gasoline (RFG) program originated with the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments to address high ozone and air toxics levels in major urban areas. These areas include portions of 17 states and represent approximately 30% of the total U.S. gasoline volume. Initially, formulation changes were limited to addition of oxygen and reductions in benzene and fuel Reid vapor pressure (RVP) levels. These reformulations were intended to meet minimum emissions reduction targets for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), air toxics, and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) when compared to a 1990 baseline gasoline in a “1990’s technology” vehicle fleet. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) developed two computational models, the Simple Model in 1995 and the Complex Model in 1998, for use in demonstrating compliance with the regulations. This article reviews the derivation and evolution of the RFG program. Initially, RFG’s emissions reduction benefits compared to conventional gasoline (CG) resulted primarily from differences in fuel sulfur levels, benzene content, and RVP. However, due to other regulatory changes over the past two decades, the compositions…
Datasets icon
Annotation icon

A Quasi-Dimensional Model of Pre-Chamber Spark-Ignition Engines

FEV Engine Technology-Knut Habermann
University of Naples-Fabio Bozza, Vincenzo De Bellis, Daniela Tufano, Enrica Malfi
  • Technical Paper
  • 2019-01-0470
To be published on 2019-04-02 by SAE International in United States
Increasingly stringent legislations are inducing the car manufacturers to investigate innovative solutions to improve the vehicle fuel economy. Some of them act on the vehicle/engine interaction, such as the powertrain electrification, while other techniques directly affect the engine thermal efficiency. Among them, concerning the spark-ignition engines, a lean combustion showed the potential to improve the fuel consumption. This approach, on the other hand, causes some drawbacks, such as a combustion stability worsening and the impossibility for the TWC to optimally operate. A pre-chamber ignition system could represent an interesting solution to overcome the above issues. Especially in the case of an active system, a high fuel-air mixture ignitability, and an adequate combustion speed can be obtained even with a very lean mixture. In this work, a research single-cylinder SI engine equipped with an active pre-chamber is analyzed. A conventional gasoline fuel is injected in the main chamber while the pre-chamber is fed with CNG. In a first stage, an experimental campaign is carried out under various operating conditions, at various speeds, spark timings and air-fuel…

PHEV Real World Driving Cycle and Energy and Fuel Consumption Reduction Potential for Connected and Automated Vehicles

Michigan Technological Univ.-Darrell Robinette, Eric Kostreva, Alexandra Krisztian, Anthony Lackey, Christopher Morgan, Joshua Orlando, Neeraj Rama
  • Technical Paper
  • 2019-01-0307
To be published on 2019-04-02 by SAE International in United States
This paper presents real world driving energy and fuel consumption results for the second-generation Chevrolet Volt plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV). A drive cycle, local to Michigan Technological University, was designed to mimic urban and highway driving test cycles in terms of distance, transients and average velocity, but with significant elevation changes to establish an energy intensive real world driving cycle for assessing potential energy savings for connected and automated vehicle control. The investigation began by establishing baseline and repeatability of energy consumption at various battery states of charges. It was determined that drive cycle energy consumption under a randomized set of boundary conditions varied within 3.4% of mean energy consumption regardless of initial battery state of charge. After completing 30 baseline drive cycles, a design for six sigma (DFSS) L18 array was designed to look at sensitivity of a range of parameters to energy consumption as related to connected and automated vehicles to target highest return on engineering development effort. The parameters explored in the DFSS array that showed the most sensitivity, in order…

Improved Approach for Analytically Derived CO2 Prediction of Medium Duty Chassis Certified Vehicles

Ford Motor Company-Mrudula Orpe, Thomas Megli, Patrick Phlips, William Ruona, Donnell Washington II
  • Technical Paper
  • 2019-01-0311
To be published on 2019-04-02 by SAE International in United States
Medium duty vehicles come in many design variations, which makes testing them all for CO2 impractical. As a result there are multiple ways of reporting CO2 emissions. Actual tests may be performed, data substitution may be used, or CO2 values may be estimated using an analytical correction. The correction accounts for variations in road load force coefficients (f0, f1, f2), weight, and axle ratio. The Code of Federal Regulations defines this Analytically Derived CO2 equation (ADC) using a limited set of historical data. The current ADC equation prediction error of ~120 g/mile is about 4 to 5 times higher than test-to-test variability, which has restricted its use. An improved method is desired to (1) reduce testing expense and complexity, and (2) provide a better CO2 estimate. Previous work on light duty vehicles has demonstrated a physical linear relation between vehicle fuel consumption, powertrain properties and total vehicle work [SAE 2018-01-0322]. This functional form is used to improve the accuracy of the ADC equation, and avoids collinearity and non-orthogonality of the predictor variables. The form also…

Experimental investigations on the influence of valve timing and multi-pulse injection on GCAI Combustion

Indian Institute of Technology Madras-Jensen Samuel, Santhosh Mithun, Kasinath Panda, A Ramesh
MSCE, RWTH Aachen University-Maximilian Wick, Jakob Andert
  • Technical Paper
  • 2019-01-0967
To be published on 2019-04-02 by SAE International in United States
Gasoline Compressed Auto-Ignition (GCAI) technology, which can be categorized under Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI), is a low-temperature combustion system with promising benefits such as ultra-low in-cylinder NOx emissions and reduced brake-specific fuel consumption, which are the critical parameters in any modern engine. Since this technology is based on uncontrolled auto-ignition of a premixed charge, it is very sensitive to any change in boundary conditions during engine operation. Adopting real time valve timing and fuel-injection strategies can enable improved control over GCAI combustion. This work discusses the outcome of collaborative experimental research by the partnering institutes in this direction. Experiments were performed in a single cylinder GCAI engine with variable valve timing and Gasoline Direct Injection (GDI) at constant indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP). In the first phase, intake and exhaust valve timing sweeps were investigated. It was found that the Intake Valve Closing (IVC) timing and Exhaust Valve Closing (EVC) timing have a dominant influence on combustion, performance and emission parameters. Retarding the IVC timing to a certain extent increased the mass of air…

TSCI with Wet Ethanol: an Investigation of the Effects of Injection Strategy on a Diesel Engine Architecture

SUNY-Stonybrook-Ziming Yan
Stony Brook Univ.-Brian Gainey, James Gohn, Mozhgan Rahimi Boldaji, Benjamin Lawler
  • Technical Paper
  • 2019-01-1146
To be published on 2019-04-02 by SAE International in United States
Thermally Stratified Compressions Ignition (TSCI) is a new advanced, low temperature combustion concept that aims to control the thermal stratification in the cylinder in order to control the heat release process in a lean, compression-ignition combustion mode. This work in particular uses “wet ethanol”, a mixture of 80% ethanol and 20% water by mass, to increase thermal stratification beyond what naturally occurs, via evaporative cooling. TSCI with wet ethanol has previously shown the potential to increase the high-load limit when compared to HCCI. The experiments conducted in this paper aim to fundamentally understand the effect that injection strategy has on the heat release process in TSCI. TSCI employs a split-injection strategy in which an injection during the intake stroke allows the majority of the fuel to premix with the air and an injection during the compression stroke introduces the desired level of thermal stratification to control the heat release rate. Using a single injection at -350 deg aTDC was found to be the most effective way to introduce the fuel during the intake stroke. The…

Experiment Studies of Charging Strategy for Lithium-ion Batteries

Xuezhe Wei
Tongji Univ-Pei Yu, Haifeng Dai
  • Technical Paper
  • 2019-01-0792
To be published on 2019-04-02 by SAE International in United States
Regarding the lithium-ion batteries used in the electric vehicle, charging time and charging efficiency are the concern of the public. In this paper, a lot of experiments were conducted to investigate the common charging strategies, including the CC-CV (constant current-constant voltage) charging and the pulse current charging, for the LiFepO4 batteries, which are still widely used in commercial vehicles. Charging temperature and the charging current in the CC phase are the main influence factors to be studied for the CC-CV charging strategy, and the contribution of CC phase and CV phase to the whole charging is analyzed from three aspects, including the time percent, charging energy efficiency and the capacity of battery at different temperatures and charging current.Regarding the pulse charging strategy, the pulse frequency is determined from the perspective of energy loss, then the experiments for pulse charging with different pulse mode, different duty cycle, as well as different charging temperature and charging current were conducted to study the characteristic of pulse charging.In order to eliminate the battery polarization, we optimized the charging current…

Evaluation of Emissions from Light Duty Trucks with and without the Use of a Gasoline Particulate Filter

Environment and Climate Change Canada-Fadi Araji, Jonathan Stokes
  • Technical Paper
  • 2019-01-0971
To be published on 2019-04-02 by SAE International in United States
The goal of this study was to investigate the emission impacts of replacing the OEM three way catalyst on light duty trucks using various, commercially available, gasoline particulate filter (GPF) configurations. The three test vehicles were; a Port Fuel Injection (PFI) PFI_1 and two Gasoline Direct Injection (GDI) GDI_1 and GDI_2. The testing of these vehicles was conducted on a chassis dynamometer in a controlled test cell environment at two temperatures (25 °C and -7 °C) using the Federal Test Procedure (FTP-75) and the US06 test procedure. All three vehicles were tested in stock OEM configuration followed by testing PFI_1 and GDI_1 with a non-catalyzed GPF and GDI_2 with a catalyzed GPF. GDI_2 was also tested on-road using a portable emissions measurement system (PEMS) with and without the use of the catalyzed GPF. Results for the non-catalyzed GPF configuration on PFI_1 and GDI_1 showed a decrease in Total Particulate Matter (TPM) at both standard and cold temperatures, with the biggest decrease being 89.3% for GDI_1 during the FTP-75 at 25 °C. An increase in NOx…

The Physical and Chemical Effects of Fuel on Gasoline Compression Ignition

King Abdullah Univ of Science & Tech-Ponnya Hlaing, Abdullah S. AlRamadan, Yanzhao An, Bengt Johansson
Saudi Aramco-R. Vallinayagam, Jaeheon Sim, Junseok Chang
  • Technical Paper
  • 2019-01-1150
To be published on 2019-04-02 by SAE International in United States
In the engine community, gasoline compression ignition (GCI) engines are at the forefront of research and efforts are being taken to commercialize an optimized GCI engine in the near future. GCI engines are operated typically at Partially Premixed Combustion (PPC) mode as it offers better control of combustion with improved combustion stability. While the transition in combustion homogeneity from convectional Compression Ignition (CI) to Homogenized Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion via PPC has been compressively investigated, the physical and chemical effects of fuel on GCI are rarely reported at different combustion modes. Therefore, in this study, the effect of physical and chemical properties of fuels on GCI is investigated. In-order to investigate the reported problem, low octane gasoline fuels with same RON = 70 but different physical properties and sensitivity (S) are chosen. Fuels with comparable sensitivity and RON are chosen to study the impact of physical properties on GCI. On the other hand, by keeping the same RON and physical properties, the effect of sensitivity on GCI is investigated. In this regard, three test…

HYDROGEN-DIESEL ENGINE: PROBLEMS AND PROSPECTS OF IMPROVING THE WORKING PROCESS

Bauman Moscow Technical University-Revaz Kavtaradze
Institute of Machine Mechanics-Tamaz Natriashvili
  • Technical Paper
  • 2019-01-0541
To be published on 2019-04-02 by SAE International in United States
The diesel engine with direct injection of hydrogen gas has clear advantages over the hydrogen engine with forced ignition of a hydrogen-air mixture. Despite of this, the concept of hydrogen-diesel engine has not investigated until now. In the paper, a detailed study of the working process of hydrogen-diesel engine carried out for the first time. Based on the results of the experimental studies and mathematical modeling, it has established that the behavior of thermophysical processes in the combustion chamber of hydrogen-diesel engine, in a number of cases, differs fundamentally from the processes that take place in the conventional diesel engines. There have been identified the reasons for their difference and determined the values of the operating cycle parameters of hydrogen diesel engine, which provide the optimal correlation between the indicator values and the environmental performance. For a single-cylinder hydrogen-diesel engine MAN (S/D=300/240 mm/mm) the concentration of nitrogen oxides in combustion products is: [NOx] = 920 ppm, the mean effective pressure pe=9.0 bar, and the indicator efficiency of hydrogen diesel engine ηi=0.48. Overall, it can be…