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Influence of port water injection on the combustion characteristics and exhaust emissions in a spark-ignition direct-injection engine

Shanghai Jiao Tong University-Yadong Fan, Tianbao Wu, Xuesong Li, Min Xu, David Hung
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-0294
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
It is well known that spark-ignition direct-injection (SIDI) gasoline engines have a huge advantage in fuel economy due to their good anti-knock performance compared to port fuel injection engines. However, higher particle number (PN) emissions associated with fuel impingement make the SIDI engines have additional difficulties to meet the upcoming China VI emission standards. In this study, the port water injection (PWI) techniques on a 1.0-L turbocharged, three cylinder, SIDI engine were investigated. PWI strategies were optimized to quantify port water injection as a means of mitigating the knock and improving the combustion performance by sweeping water-fuel mass ratios and PWI timing at different operating conditions. Measurements indicate that regardless of engine load, PWI induced a worsening of the maximum in-cylinder pressure (P-Max) and cycle-to-cycle variations (IMEPN-COV ) , which mainly due to the effects of water dilution and slower burning velocities. But by the advance of spark timing with knock mitigation, we find that the improvement of combustion phasing finally makes it possible to eliminate fuel enrichment, which bring the potential advantages on the…
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Automated Driving System Safety: Miles for 95% Confidence in “Vision Zero”

Driving Safety Consulting LLC-Richard Allen Young
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-1205
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
Engineering reliability models from RAND, MobilEye, and Volvo concluded that billions of miles of on-road data were required to validate that the real-world fatality rate of an “Automated Driving System-equipped vehicle” (AV) fleet for an improvement over human-driven conventional vehicles (CV). RAND said 5 billion miles for 20%, MobileEye 30 billion for 99.9%, and Volvo 5 billion for 50% improvement. All these models used the Gaussian distribution, which is inaccurate for low crash numbers. The current study proposes a new epidemiologic method and criterion to validate real-world AV data with 95% confidence for zero to ten fatal crashes. The upper confidence limit (UL) of the AV fatal crash rate has to be lower than the CV fatal crash rate with 95% confidence. That criterion is met if the UL of the AV fatal crash incidence rate ratio estimate is below one. That UL was estimated using the mid-P exact method for calculating confidence limits for a dual Poisson process, using a one-tailed 95% confidence level. The required AV mileage was adjusted by trial and error…
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Thermal Modeling of DC/AC Inverter for Electrified Powertrain Systems

FCA US LLC-Meng Li, Bruce Geist
Gotion, Inc.-Fan He
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-1384
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
A DC-to-AC main Power Inverter Module (PIM) is one of the key components in electrified powertrain systems. Accurate thermal modeling and temperature prediction of a PIM is critical to the design, analysis, and control of a cooling system within an electrified vehicle. PIM heat generation is a function of the electric loading applied to the chips and the limited heat dissipation within what is typically compact packaging of the Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) module inside the PIM. This work presents a thermal modeling approach for a 3-phase DC/AC PIM that is part of an automotive electrified powertrain system. Heat generation of the IGBT/diode pairs under electric load is modeled by a set of formulae capturing both the static and dynamic losses of the chips in the IGBT module. A thermal model of the IGBT module with a simplified liquid cooling system generates temperature estimates for the PIM. Temperatures of chips, baseplates, and sinks are predicted from electric input loads. A case study is provided in wh ich the PIM thermal model is coupled with…
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Application of Low-Mass Corning® FLORA® Substrate for Cold-Start Emissions Reduction to Meet Upcoming LEV III SULEV30 Regulation Requirement

Corning-Jason Warkins, Tinghong Tao, Min Shen, Song Lyu
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-0652
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
With upcoming US Tier 3 / LEV III emissions regulation set for full implementation in 2025, significant efforts are being made within the industry to meet the fleet average SULEV30 requirement. With the current vehicle technology, cold-start emissions generated in the first sixty seconds can make up to 70% of total tailpipe emission over the FTP-75 certification cycle. Therefore, the improvement in the performance of catalyzed substrates during cold-start becomes essential for total tailpipe emissions reduction. Low-mass substrate technology offers a significant reduction in time to light-off enabling a reduction in cold-start emissions while meeting customer mechanical durability and thermo-mechanical requirements. The ability of this lower-mass substrate to improve light-off time compared to conventional higher-mass substrates has been measured through fundamental modeling and vehicle dyno testing and verified to deliver up to 20% improvement in total tailpipe emissions over the entire emissions cycle and across a wide array of vehicle platforms with various engine cold-start calibration technologies. Alternatively, low-mass substrate technology can be applied with reductions in platinum group metals (PGM) to maintain equivalent emissions…
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Tightening Reliability of Bolted Joints in Calibrated Wrench Method (Improvement of Initial Clamping Force Distribution and Optimum Tightening Torque by Elliptical Confidence Limit)

Tokyo Metropolitan University-Soichi Hareyama, Ken-ichi Manabe, Satoshi Kobayashi
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-0218
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
On tightening bolted joints, the calibrated wrench method is used in manufacturing industries for a large amount of tightening work. It is important to give high initial clamping force in respect of tightening reliability, prevention of self-loosening, the prevention from fatigue breakage, and so on. In this method the clamping force of bolted joints is controlled by grasping the wrench torque. However, since the clamping force is indirectly applied by wrench, it varies greatly in lot of tightening in factory, etc. Therefore, the calibrated wrench method is not so accurate from the viewpoint of clamping force control. It is thought that distribution of this kind is conventionally varied in a rhombus. When tightening torque and clamping force are considered to be two independent random variables, the clamping force is distributed within an elliptical confidence limit. We also show that the distribution of equivalent stress is obtained in an elliptical confidence limit. Considering the permitted limit for working load stress on a bolted joint, elliptical distribution has big margin to yield point than the shape of…
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Research on Joining High Pressure Die Casting Parts by Self-Pierce Riveting (SPR) using Ring-Groove Die Comparing to Heat Treatment Method

Bollhoff Inc.-Xuzhe Zhao
Chang’an University-Dean Meng
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-0222
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
Nowadays, the increasing number of structural high pressure die casting (HPDC) aluminum parts need to be joined with high strength steel (HSS) parts in order to reduce the weight of vehicle for fuel-economy considerations. Self-Pierce Riveting (SPR) has become one of the strongest mechanical joining solutions used in automotive industry for the past several decades. Joining HPDC parts with HSS parts can potentially cause joint quality issues, such as joint button cracks, low corrosion resistance and low joint strength. The appropriate heat treatment will be suggested to improve SPR joint quality in terms of crack reduction. But the heat treatment can also result in the blister issue and extra time and cost consumption for HPDC parts. The relationship between the microstructure of HPDC material before and after heat treatment with the joint quality is going to be investigated and discussed for interpretation of cracks initiation and propagation during riveting. The SPR joint quality will be evaluated based on interlock distance, the minimum remaining thickness (Tmin), shear strength etc. Instead of using heat treatment method, the…
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On Maximizing Argon Engines' Performance via Subzero Intake Temperatures in HCCI Mode at High Compression Ratios

King Abdullah University of Science & Technology-Ali Elkhazraji, Abdulrahman Mohammed, Sufyan Jan, Jean-Baptiste Masurier, Robert Dibble, Bengt Johansson
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-1133
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
Maximizing the indicated thermal efficiency with minimal amount of emissions is one of the main challenges to overcome in the field of internal combustion engines. The main obstacle that hinders achieving this goal is the typically low thermodynamic efficiency which is the ratio of the positive produced work on the piston to the amount of heat released inside the cylinder. Many concepts and technologies were innovated to maximize the thermodynamic efficiency. One of the main guidelines that have been followed to achieve so, is the ideal Otto’s cycle that predicts that increasing the compression ratio and/or the specific heat ratio of the combustion reactants, will maximize the thermodynamic efficiency. This study combines both high compression ratios and a high specific heat ratio via two of the main approaches used to maximize the thermodynamic efficiency. First, is the HCCI combustion mode. HCCI is typically operated at fuel-lean conditions, allowing to operate at higher compression ratios without having intense knock (pressure waves, generated by undesired autoignition, that can damage the engine). Second, air was replaced by an…
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Downsized-Boosted Gasoline Engine with Exhaust Compound and Lean Advanced Combustion

General Motors LLC-Jeremie Dernotte, Paul M. Najt, Russell P. Durrett
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-0795
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
This article presents the experimental results obtained with a disruptive engine platform, designed to maximize the engine efficiency through a synergetic implementation of downsizing, high compression-ratio, and importantly exhaust-heat energy recovery in conjunction with advanced lean/dilute low-temperature type combustion. The engine architecture is a supercharged high-power output, 1.1-liter engine with two-firing cylinders and a high compression ratio of 13.5:1. The integrated exhaust heat recovery system is an additional, larger displacement, non-fueled cylinder into which the exhaust gas from the two firing cylinders is alternately transferred to be further expended. The main goal of this work is to implement advanced lean/dilute combustion while minimizing NOx emissions and addressing the transition between the operating modes. The combustion modes include well-mixed charge compression-ignition at low-load, and a mixed-mode combustion strategy at higher loads. The mixed-mode combustion strategy is composed of a deflagration of a stratified mixture, triggering a controlled autoignition of the surrounding gas. The paper describes the key features of the engine and details regarding the combustion and multi-mode valve strategies. The experiments were performed under steady-state…
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User Defined FE Based Connector Joints For Plastics

CAEfatigue Ltd-Neil Bishop, Paresh Murthy
Hella GmbH & Co. KGaA-Thomas Thesing, Odo Karger
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-0186
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
Spot Welds are a category of joints used extensively in automotive structures, normally for metals. The fatigue analysis of such spot welds can be evaluated using (a) the Point 2 Point (P2P) method where a beam or bar is used to connect the 2 surfaces being joined, (b) a more modern approach where the 1D element is replaced with an “equivalent” brick element, or (c) a third approach falls somewhere between where a “spider” and circular ring of elements is used to represent the spot weld. In all three cases there is an assumption that the cross section is circular. For some specialist cases such as plastic connectors (Heat Stakes) a new user defined weld is proposed. This paper will describe the approach which is based on the concept that a user generated tensor line (equivalent to the theoretical Force/Moment to stress algorithms built into the P2P approach) can be used along with special S-N curves create for different Heat Stake shapes.
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Ammonia Measurement Investigation Using Quantum Cascade Laser and Two Different Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy Methods

Caterpillar UK Ltd-Richard Barrett, Jim Baxter
Loughborough university-Nilton Li, Ashraf El-Hamalawi
  • Technical Paper
  • 2020-01-0365
To be published on 2020-04-14 by SAE International in United States
Most diesel engine exhausts have been fitted with SCR (Selective Catalyst Reduction) in order to reduce NOX (Oxides of Nitrogen) by using NH3 (ammonia). However, both NOX and NH3 have been classified as compounds hazardous for the environment and human health. If the reaction between NOX and NH3 is unbalanced during treatment, it can lead to either NOX or NH3 being released into the environment. Accurate measurement is thus necessary. QCL (Quantum Cascade Laser) and FTIR (Fourier Transform InfraRed) are two methods that have been used to measure NH3 and NOX directly in diesel engine exhausts. However, only a few studies have compared those two methods of NH3 measurement, mainly from diesel engine exhausts. The aim of this paper is to compare the QCL and 2 different FTIR specifications for NH3 measurement directly from diesel engine exhausts under well-controlled laboratory conditions. Researchers have found that as NH3 is reactive, it is absorbed inside the exhaust pipe if the probe location is some distance away from the SCR. The results reported here contradict this and show…