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The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to provide management, designers, and operators with information to assist them to decide what type of power train monitoring they desire. This document is to provide assistance in optimizing system complexity, performance and cost effectiveness. This document covers all power train elements from the point at which aircraft propulsion energy in a turbine or reciprocating engine is converted via a gear train to mechanical energy for propulsion purposes. The document covers aircraft engine driven transmission and gearbox components, their interfaces, drivetrain shafting, drive shaft hanger bearings, and associated rotating accessories, propellers, and rotor systems as shown in Figure 1. For guidance on monitoring additional engine components not addressed, herein (e.g., main shaft bearings and compressor/turbine rotors), refer to ARP1839. This document addresses rotary and fixed wing applications for rotor, turboprop, turbofan
E-32 Aerospace Propulsion Systems Health Management
For Engine Monitoring Systems to meet their potential for improved safety and reduced operation and support costs, significant attention must be focused on their reliability and validity throughout the life cycle. This AIR will provide program managers, designers, developers and customers a concise reference of the activities, approaches and considerations for the development and verification of a highly reliable engine monitoring system. When applying the guidelines of this AIR it should be noted that engine monitoring systems physically or functionally integrated with the engine control system and/or performing functions that affect engine safety or are used to effect continued operation or return to service decisions shall be subject to the Type Investigation of the product in which they'll be incorporated and have to show compliance with the applicable airworthiness requirements as defined by the responsible Aviation Authority. This is not limited to but includes the application of
E-32 Aerospace Propulsion Systems Health Management
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is a general overview of typical airborne engine vibration monitoring (EVM) systems applicable to fixed or rotary wing aircraft applications, with an emphasis on system design considerations. It describes EVM systems currently in use and future trends in EVM development. The broader scope of Health and Usage Monitoring Systems, (HUMS ) is covered in SAE documents AS5391, AS5392, AS5393, AS5394, AS5395, AIR4174
E-32 Aerospace Propulsion Systems Health Management
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) provides information and guidance for the selection and use of technologies and methods for lubrication system monitoring of gas turbine aircraft engines. This AIR describes technologies and methods covering oil system performance monitoring, oil debris monitoring, and oil condition monitoring. Both on-aircraft and off-aircraft applications are presented. A higher-level view of lubrication system monitoring as part of an overall engine monitoring system (EMS), is discussed in ARP1587. The scope of this document is limited to those lubrication system monitoring, inspection and analysis methods and devices that can be considered appropriate for health monitoring and routine maintenance. This AIR is intended to be used as a technical guide. It is not intended to be used as a legal document or standard
E-32 Aerospace Propulsion Systems Health Management
SAE Aerospace Information Report AIR1871 provides valuable insight into lessons learned in the development, implementation, and operation of various health monitoring systems for propulsion engines and drive train systems. This document provides an overview of the lessons learned for ground-based systems, oil debris monitoring systems, lubrication systems, and Health and Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS) for military and commercial programs. For each case study, this document presents a brief technical description, the design requirements, accomplishments, lessons learned, and future recommendations. The lessons learned presented in this document represent a fragment of the knowledge gained through experience when developing and implementing a propulsion health management system. Previous versions of this document contain additional lessons learned during the 1980’s and 1990’s that may be of additional value to the reader. This document will be maintained as technology progresses so that
E-32 Aerospace Propulsion Systems Health Management
ARP5120 provides recommended best practices, procedures, and technology to guide the physical and functional design, development, integration, verification, and validation of highly reliable Engine Health Management (EHM) systems for aircraft engines and Auxiliary Power Units (APUs). This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) also serves as a concise reference of considerations, approaches, activities, and requirements for producing the end-to-end engine health management system comprised of both on and off-board subsystems for the sensing, acquisition, analysis, detection, and data handling functions for EHM. These functions may also be used to effect continued operation or return to service decisions when demonstrated as compliant with the applicable airworthiness requirements defined by the responsible Aviation Authority. Where practical, this document delineates between military and commercial practices
E-32 Aerospace Propulsion Systems Health Management
The effectiveness of Engine Life Usage Monitoring and Parts Management systems is largely determined by the aircraft-specific requirements. This document addresses the following areas: safety, life-limiting criteria, life usage algorithm development, data acquisition and management, parts life tracking, design feedback, and cost effectiveness. It primarily examines the requirements and techniques currently in use, and considers the potential impact of new technolog to the following areas: parts classification and control requirements, failure causes of life-limited parts, engine life prediction and usage measurement techniques, method validation, parts life usage data management, lessons learned, and life usage tracking benefits. SAE ARP1587 provides general guidance on the design consideration and objectives of monitoring systems for aircraft gas turbine engines. A major function of these Engine Monitoring Systems is to monitor the usage of life-limited parts in order to maximize
E-32 Aerospace Propulsion Systems Health Management
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to provide information that would be useful to potential users/operators and decision makers for evaluating and quantifying the benefits of an Engine Monitoring Systems (EMS) versus its cost of implementation. This document presents excerpts from reports developed to analyze "actual aircraft cost/benefits results". These are presented as follows: a. First, to outline the benefits and cost elements pertaining to EMS that may be used in performing a cost versus benefits analysis. b. Second, to present considerations for use in conducting the analysis. c. Third, to provide examples of analyses and results as they relate to the user/operator and decision-maker community. The document encompasses helicopters and fixed wing aircraft and distinguishes between civilian and military considerations. This document is not intended to be used as a technical guide, nor is it intended to provide methodologies, be a legal document, or be a
E-32 Aerospace Propulsion Systems Health Management
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) provides guidance for the design of flanges on temperature sensors intended for use in gas turbine engines. Three figures detail the configuration of standard size flange mounts with bolt holes, slotted flanges, and miniaturized flanges for small probes
E-32 Aerospace Propulsion Systems Health Management
An effective GSS is vital to the successful implementation of an EMS and is a fundamental part of the total monitoring system design, including asset management. Unlike the on-board part of the EMS which principally uses real time data to indicate when engine maintenance is required, a GSS can offer much greater processing power to comprehensively analyze and manipulate EMS data for both maintenance and logistics purposes. This document reviews the main EMS functions and discusses the operating requirements used to determine the basis design of a GSS, including the interfaces with other maintenance or logistic systems. A brief discussion is also included on some of the more recent advances in GSS technology that have been specifically developed to provide more effective diagnostic capabilities for gas turbine engines
E-32 Aerospace Propulsion Systems Health Management
E-32 Aerospace Propulsion Systems Health Management
AMS2980/1 gives information about the technical requirements and qualification procedure for carbon fiber fabric and epoxy resin systems used for wet lay-up repair of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy structures
AMS CACRC Commercial Aircraft Composite Repair Committee
This specification covers a melt-processible, copolymer resin of ethylene and tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE) in the form of extruded rods, tubes, and shapes
AMS P Polymeric Materials Committee
This specification covers procedures for marking bare wire for welding to provide positive identification of cut lengths, regardless of length, and of spools, and to ensure that the wire is clean and free from foreign materials and corrosion
AMS B Finishes Processes and Fluids Committee
This specification covers a low-modulus aramid in the form of tape
AMS P Polymeric Materials Committee
This specification covers cored and uncored open cell latex foam rubber sheets, molded and hand- built shapes having good shock-absorbing, vibration-damping, and comfort cushioning characteristics (see 6.1
AMS P Polymeric Materials Committee
This specification covers a magnesium alloy in the form of permanent mold castings
AMS D Nonferrous Alloys Committee
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of sheet and plate
AMS D Nonferrous Alloys Committee
This specification covers a magnesium alloy in the form of permanent mold castings
AMS D Nonferrous Alloys Committee
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant nickel-iron alloy in the form of welding wire
AMS F Corrosion and Heat Resistant Alloys Committee
This specification has been 'CANCELLED' by the Aerospace Materials Division, SAE, as of February 1996
AMS P Polymeric Materials Committee
This specification has been 'CANCELLED' by the Aerospace Materials Division, SAE, as of February 1996
AMS P Polymeric Materials Committee
This specification covers the requirements for silver deposited on metal parts with a copper strike between the basis metal and the silver deposit
AMS B Finishes Processes and Fluids Committee
This specification has been declared "CANCELLED " by the Aerospace Materials Division, SAE, as of December 2008 and has been superseded by AMS3100B. The requirements of the latest issue of AMS3100B shall be fulfilled whenever reference is made to the cancelled AMS3100/2A. By this action, this document will remain listed in the Numerical Section of the Index of Aerospace Material Specifications, noting that it has been superseded by AMS3100B
AMS G9 Aerospace Sealing Committee
This specification covers a magnesium alloy in the form of sheet and plate
AMS D Nonferrous Alloys Committee
This specification covers a magnesium alloy in the form of sheet and plate
AMS D Nonferrous Alloys Committee
This specification covers balls made of a low-chromium, high-carbon steel
AMS E Carbon and Low Alloy Steels Committee
This specification covers an aluminum alloy procured in the form of extruded bars, rods, and profiles (shapes) with nominal thickness up to 3.000 inch (76.20 mm), inclusive, and having a cross-sectional area of 26.3 square inches (170 cm2) maximum and circle size of 15.3 inches (389 mm) maximum (see 8.7
AMS D Nonferrous Alloys Committee
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, and forging stock
AMS E Carbon and Low Alloy Steels Committee
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, and forging stock
AMS E Carbon and Low Alloy Steels Committee
This specification covers a titanium alloy in the form of sheet, strip, and plate up to 1.000 inch (25.40 mm) inclusive
AMS G Titanium and Refractory Metals Committee
This specification covers four classes of tungsten heavy metal in the form of sintered and annealed shapes
AMS G Titanium and Refractory Metals Committee
Primarily for preservation, during extended periods of shipment and/or storage, of miscellaneous metal parts, tools, subassemblies, and equipment where the compound is readily accessible for removal and removal does not damage the parts
AMS B Finishes Processes and Fluids Committee
This specification has been "CANCELLED" by the Aerospace Materials Division, SAE, as of October 1995
AMS P Polymeric Materials Committee
This specification covers a biodegradable, formaldehyde-base material, containing additives, in the form of a concentrated liquid
AMS J Aircraft Maintenance Chemicals and Materials Committee
This specification has been "CANCELLED" by the Aerospace Materials Division, SAE, as of October 1995
AMS P Polymeric Materials Committee
This specification establishes requirements for aerosol packaging
AMS B Finishes Processes and Fluids Committee
This specification has been "CANCELLED" by the Aerospace Materials Division, SAE, as of October 1996
AMS P Polymeric Materials Committee
AMS P Polymeric Materials Committee
This specification covers the engineering requirements for selective (brush) electrodeposition of nickel and the properties of the deposit. This process has been used typically to provide good wear resistance and dimensional build-up and restoration of parts which may operate in service up to 450 degrees F (232 degrees C), where low tensile stress in the deposit is required, but usage is not limited to such applications. Diffusion heat treatment of the deposit is not required
AMS B Finishes Processes and Fluids Committee
This specification covers the specific requirements for 7075 aluminum alloy alclad one side plate and sheet; the general requirements are covered in AMS-QQ-A-250. The plate and sheet covered by this specification shall be an integral composite product consisting of a heat-treatable aluminum alloy (7075) core with a thin layer of an aluminum alloy (7072) anodic to the core bonded to one surface
AMS D Nonferrous Alloys Committee
This specification covers a free-machining carbon steel in the form of bars
AMS E Carbon and Low Alloy Steels Committee
This specification has been declared "CANCELLED " by the Aerospace Materials Division, SAE, as of December 2008 and has been superseded by AMS2644. The requirements of the latest issue of AMS2644 shall be fulfilled whenever reference is made to the cancelled AMS3155. By this action, this document will remain listed in the Numerical Section of the Index of Aerospace Material Specifications, noting that it has been superseded by AMS2644
AMS K Non Destructive Methods and Processes Committee
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