Your Selections

Szymkowicz, Patrick
Show Only

Collections

File Formats

Content Types

Dates

Sectors

Topics

Authors

Publishers

Affiliations

Events

   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Combination of Pre-EGR Cooler Oxidation Catalyst and Water Vapor Condensation to Mitigate Fouling

SAE International Journal of Engines

General Motors Research and Development-Alok Warey, Anil Singh Bika, Alberto Vassallo, Sandro Balestrino, Patrick Szymkowicz
  • Journal Article
  • 2014-01-0636
Published 2014-04-01 by SAE International in United States
Cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) is widely used in diesel engines to control engine out NOx (oxides of nitrogen) emissions. A portion of the exhaust gases is re-circulated into the intake manifold of the engine after cooling it through a heat exchanger known as an EGR cooler. EGR cooler heat exchangers, however, tend to lose efficiency and have increased pressure drop as deposit forms on the heat exchanger surface due to transport of soot particles and condensing species to the cooler walls. In our previous work surface condensation of water vapor was shown to be successful in removing a significant portion of the accumulated deposit mass from various types of deposit layers typically encountered in EGR coolers. Significant removal of accumulated deposit mass was observed for “dry” soot only deposit layers, while little to no removal was observed for the deposit layers created at low coolant temperatures that consisted of both soot and condensed hydrocarbons (HC). The focus of this study was to explore the potential benefits of combining a pre-EGR cooler oxidation catalyst (OC)…
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

An Investigation of Diesel EGR Cooler Fouling and Effectiveness Recovery

General Motors Company-Alok Warey, Patrick Szymkowicz, Sandro Balestrino, David Long
Univ. of Minnesota-Twin Cities-Anil Singh Bika
Published 2013-04-08 by SAE International in United States
Diesel engine developers are continually striving to reduce harmful NOx emissions through various calibration and hardware strategies. One strategy being implemented in production Diesel engines involves utilizing cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Although there is a significant NOx reduction potential by utilizing cooled EGR, there are also several issues associated with it, such as EGR cooler fouling and a reduction in cooler effectiveness that can occur over time. The exact cause of these issues and many others related to cooler fouling are not clearly understood. One such unanswered issue or phenomenon that has been observed in both field tested and lab tested EGR coolers is that of a recovery in EGR cooler effectiveness after a shutdown or after cycling between various conditions. The purpose of the current work was to show that an effectiveness restoration or effectiveness recovery can occur in an EGR cooler that has been exposed to soot-laden exhaust gases, through changes in operating conditions, with specific emphasis on exposure to high condensation conditions. The work was conducted on a multi-cylinder diesel engine…
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Visualization and Analysis of Condensation in Exhaust Gas Recirculation Coolers

General Motors Company-Alok Warey, David Long, Sandro Balestrino, Patrick Szymkowicz
Univ of Minnesota-Twin Cities-Anil Singh Bika
Published 2013-04-08 by SAE International in United States
Cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) is widely used in diesel engines to control engine-out NOx (oxides of nitrogen) emissions. A portion of the exhaust gases is re-circulated into the intake manifold of the engine after cooling it through a heat exchanger. EGR cooler heat exchangers, however, tend to lose efficiency and have increased pressure drop as deposit forms on the heat exchanger surface due to transport of soot particles and condensing species to the cooler walls. In this study, condensation of water vapor and hydrocarbons at the exit of the EGR cooler was visualized using a fiberscope coupled to a camera equipped with a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) color sensor. A multi-cylinder diesel engine was used to produce a range of engine-out hydrocarbon concentrations. Both surface and bulk gas condensation were observed with the visualization setup over a range of EGR cooler coolant temperatures. No condensation of water or hydrocarbons was observed above 40°C coolant temperature. For the high hydrocarbon concentration condition, visual observation of onset of condensation correlated with a significant increase in…
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Investigation of the Load Limits and Emissions of a Naturally-Aspirated Direct-Injection Diesel Engine

SAE International Journal of Engines

General Motors Company-Alejandro Plazas Torres, Patrick Szymkowicz
Univ of Minnesota (former GM Employee)-William F. Northrop
  • Journal Article
  • 2012-01-0686
Published 2012-04-16 by SAE International in United States
Cost and robustness are key factors in the design of diesel engines for low power density applications. Although compression ignition engines can produce very high power density output with turbocharging, naturally aspirated (NA) engines have advantages in terms of reduced cost and avoidance of system complexity. This work explores the use of direct injection (DI) and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) in NA engines using experimental data from a single-cylinder research diesel engine. The engine was operated with a fixed atmospheric intake manifold pressure over a map of speed, air-to-fuel ratio, EGR, fuel injection pressure and injection timing. Conventional gaseous engine-out emissions were measured along with high speed cylinder pressure data to show the load limits and resulting emissions of the NA-DI engine studied. Well known reductions in NOX with increasing levels of EGR were confirmed with a corresponding loss in peak power output. However, advancing fuel injection timing is shown to partially offset this disadvantage at the cost of higher engine noise. Partially premixed low temperature combustion (LTC) can be used over a portion of…
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Fuel Effects on Combustion and Emissions of a Direct-Injection Diesel Engine Operating at Moderate to High Engine Speed and Load

General Motors Company-Patrick Szymkowicz, William F. Northrop
Oak Ridge National Laboratory-James Szybist
Published 2012-04-16 by SAE International in United States
It is advantageous to increase the specific power output of diesel engines and to operate them at higher load for a greater portion of a driving cycle to achieve better thermal efficiency and thus reduce vehicle fuel consumption. Such operation is limited by excessive smoke formation at retarded injection timing and high rates of cylinder pressure rise at more advanced timing. Given this window of operation, it is desired to understand the influence of fuel properties such that optimum combustion performance and emissions can be retained over the range of fuels commonly available in the marketplace. Data are examined from a direct-injection single-cylinder research engine for eight common diesel fuels including soy-based biodiesel blends at two high load operating points with no exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and at a moderate load with four levels of EGR. The high load operating point that incorporates a pilot + main injection strategy shows a reduced sensitivity to fuel ignitibility compared to the high load operating point using only a single injection event. Although ignition delay varies by only…
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Study of High Speed Gasoline Direct Injection Compression Ignition (GDICI) Engine Operation in the LTC Regime

SAE International Journal of Engines

General Motors LLC-Russ Durrett, Venkatesh Gopalakrishnan, Alejandro Plazas, Richard Peterson, Patrick Szymkowicz
Univ. of Wisconsin-Youngchul Ra, Rolf D. Reitz, Michael Andrie
  • Journal Article
  • 2011-01-1182
Published 2011-04-12 by SAE International in United States
An investigation of high speed direct injection (DI) compression ignition (CI) engine combustion fueled with gasoline (termed GDICI for Gasoline Direct-Injection Compression Ignition) in the low temperature combustion (LTC) regime is presented. As an aid to plan engine experiments at full load (16 bar IMEP, 2500 rev/min), exploration of operating conditions was first performed numerically employing a multi-dimensional CFD code, KIVA-ERC-Chemkin, that features improved sub-models and the Chemkin library. The oxidation chemistry of the fuel was calculated using a reduced mechanism for primary reference fuel combustion. Operation ranges of a light-duty diesel engine operating with GDICI combustion with constraints of combustion efficiency, noise level (pressure rise rate) and emissions were identified as functions of injection timings, exhaust gas recirculation rate and the fuel split ratio of double-pulse injections. Parametric variation of the operation ranges was also investigated with respect to initial gas temperature, boost pressure and injection pressure. Following the modeling, experiments were performed under the conditions suggested by the numerical results in order to confirm the feasibility of GDICI operation at full load, as…
Annotation ability available
   This content is not included in your SAE MOBILUS subscription, or you are not logged in.

Control of Diesel HCCI Modes Using Cylinder Pressure-Based Controls

General Motors-Anupam Gangopadhyay, Frederic Matekunas, Paul Battiston, Patrick Szymkowicz, John Pinson
General Motors Powertrain Europe-Gerhard Landsmann
  • Technical Paper
  • 2006-05-0303
Published 2006-10-22 by Society of Automotive Engineers of Japan in Japan
Early and late premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) combustion modes are being explored to control the emissions from diesel engines. Combustion feedback control systems can enable the robust application of PCCI combustion by correcting variations in engine systems which cause dispersion in emissions among vehicles. Combustion feedback control also provides a tool to continuously monitor and adjust for environmental effects and system ageing. This work explores the use of cylinder-pressure-based, combustion-phasing estimators to control injection timing for early and late HCCI modes. A novel method using IMEP estimates was developed to balance individual cylinder fuel injection quantities. The impact of individual cylinder fuel injection quantity and timing control on emissions, stability and combustion noise are also evaluated.