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Comfortable Head and Neck Postures in Reclined Seating for Use in Automobile Head Rest Design

University of Michigan-Matthew Reed, Sheila Ebert, Monica Jones
Published 2019-04-02 by SAE International in United States
Little information is available on passenger preferences for posture and support in highly reclined seat configurations. To address this gap, a laboratory study was conducted with 24 adult passengers at seat back angles from 23 to 53 degrees. Passenger preferences for head and neck posture with and without head support were recorded. This paper presents the characteristics of the passengers’ preferred head support with respect to thorax, head, and neck posture.
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Sensations Associated with Motion Sickness Response during Passenger Vehicle Operations on a Test Track

University of Michigan-Monica Lynn Haumann Jones, Sheila Ebert, Matthew Reed
Published 2019-04-02 by SAE International in United States
Motion sickness in road vehicles may become an increasingly important problem as automation transforms drivers into passengers. The University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute has developed a vehicle-based platform to study motion sickness in passenger vehicles. A test-track study was conducted with 52 participants who reported susceptibility to motion sickness. The participants completed in-vehicle testing on a 20-minute scripted, continuous drive that consisted of a series of frequent 90-degree turns, braking, and lane changes at the U-M Mcity facility. In addition to quantifying their level of motion sickness on a numerical scale, participants were asked to describe in words any motion-sickness-related sensations they experienced. Prior to in-vehicle testing, participants were shown a list of sensations that are commonly experienced during motion sickness: head sensations, body temperature change, drowsiness, dizziness, mouth sensations, nausea, or other sensations, which refer to difficulty focusing, irritability, eyestrain, or difficulty concentrating. Participants were instructed not to limit themselves to the list, but rather to report in their own words how they felt throughout the drive. For each sensation, they were also…
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Upper-Extremity Postures and Activities in Naturalistic Driving

UMTRI-Sheila Ebert-Hamilton
University of Michigan - Ann Arbor-Matthew Reed
Published 2018-04-03 by SAE International in United States
Driver upper-extremity postures and activities were manually coded in 9856 video frames from 165 drivers in 100 vehicles that were instrumented with interior cameras as part of the Connected Vehicle Safety Pilot Model Deployment study. Drivers had left, right, and both hands on the steering wheel in 64%, 46%, and 28%, respectively, of frames in which the hand placements could be determined. The driver’s left elbow was in contact with the door or armrest in 18% of frames, and the driver’s right elbow was contacting the center console armrest in 29% of frames. Men were more likely than women to use both the left and right armrests. Women had approximately the same percentage of armrest use across vehicles, but men’s usage differed widely, suggesting that armrest design may influence whether people of different statures can use the armrests comfortably. Women were more likely to have a phone in their right hands than men, and women were twice as likely as men to be wearing sunglasses during trips taken in daylight hours.
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Optimizing Occupant Restraint Systems for Tactical Vehicles in Frontal Crashes

Emory University-Jonathan Rupp
US Army TARDEC-Rebekah Gruber, David Clark, Risa Scherer
Published 2018-04-03 by SAE International in United States
The objective of this study was to optimize the occupant restraint systems for a light tactical vehicle in frontal crashes. A combination of sled testing and computational modeling were performed to find the optimal seatbelt and airbag designs for protecting occupants represented by three size of ATDs and two military gear configurations. This study started with 20 sled frontal crash tests to setup the baseline performance of existing seatbelts, which have been presented previously; followed by parametric computational simulations to find the best combinations of seatbelt and airbag designs for different sizes of ATDs and military gear configurations involving both driver and passengers. Then 12 sled tests were conducted with the simulation-recommended restraint designs. The test results were further used to validate the models. Another series of computational simulations and 4 sled tests were performed to fine-tune the optimal restraint design solutions. The sled tests with the optimized seatbelt and airbag designs provided significant improvement of occupant protection from the baseline tests in terms of the head, neck, chest, and lower extremity injury measures. Using…
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Development of a Vehicle-Based Experimental Platform for Quantifying Passenger Motion Sickness during Test Track Operations

University of Michigan - Ann Arbor-Monica Lynn Haumann Jones, Kathleen Sienko, Sheila Ebert-Hamilton, Catherine Kinnaird, Carl Miller, Brian Lin, Byoung-Keon Park, John Sullivan, Matthew Reed, James Sayer
Published 2018-04-03 by SAE International in United States
Motion sickness in road vehicles may become an increasingly important problem as automation transforms drivers into passengers. Motion sickness could be mitigated through control of the vehicle motion dynamics, design of the interior environment, and other interventions. However, a lack of a definitive etiology of motion sickness challenges the design of automated vehicles (AVs) to address motion sickness susceptibility effectively. Few motion sickness studies have been conducted in naturalistic road-vehicle environments; instead, most research has been performed in driving simulators or on motion platforms that produce prescribed motion profiles. To address this gap, a vehicle-based experimental platform using a midsize sedan was developed to quantify motion sickness in road vehicles. A scripted, continuous drive consisting of a series of frequent 90-degree turns, braking, and lane changes were conducted on a closed track. The route was selected to be representative of naturalistic urban driving conditions and parameterized in terms of lateral and longitudinal acceleration intensities likely to produce motion sickness. Vehicle instrumentation included simultaneous measure of vehicle acceleration, passenger head kinematics, self-reported motion sickness ratings and…
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Applicability of Occupant Packaging and Interior Ergonomics Tools to Highly Automated Vehicles

University of Michigan - Ann Arbor-Matthew Reed
Published 2018-04-03 by SAE International in United States
The interior layout of passenger cars and light trucks is substantially aided by SAE occupant packaging tools, which include the SAE J941 eyellipse, SAE J287 reach curves, and the seating accommodation model in SAE J4004. Most of these tools were developed based on posture and position data from drivers, although an eyellipse and head contour are available for fixed-seat passenger positions. This paper reviews the current SAE occupant packaging tools and related industry practice in the context of current concepts for highly automated vehicles, considering SAE levels 4 and 5. Concepts that have driver controls for occasional use and vehicles with no driver controls are examined. Gaps in the current knowledge and tools are reviewed to establish priorities for research and development of new standards and recommended practices.
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In-Vehicle Occupant Head Tracking Using aLow-Cost Depth Camera

Toyota Motor North America Inc.-Jason Hallman, Rini Sherony
UMTRI-Byoung-Keon Daniel Park
Published 2018-04-03 by SAE International in United States
Analyzing dynamic postures of vehicle occupants in various situations is valuable for improving occupant accommodation and safety. Accurate tracking of an occupant’s head is of particular importance because the head has a large range of motion, controls gaze, and may require special protection in dynamic events including crashes. Previous vehicle occupant posture studies have primarily used marker-based optical motion capture systems or multiple video cameras for tracking facial features or markers on the head. However, the former approach has limitations for collecting on-road data, and the latter is limited by requiring intensive manual postprocessing to obtain suitable accuracy. This paper presents an automated on-road head tracking method using a single Microsoft Kinect V2 sensor, which uses a time-of-flight measurement principle to obtain a 3D point cloud representing objects in the scene at approximately 30 Hz. Vehicle passenger motions were recorded during hard braking and rapid lane changes. The dynamic head orientation and location data were obtained by fitting a subject-specific 3d head model to the depth data from each frame. Results were validated using a marker-based…
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Development of A New Dynamic Rollover Test Methodology for Heavy Vehicles

CAPE Testing-Ryan Hoover, Kevin Tribbett
Emory University-Jonathan Rupp
Published 2017-03-28 by SAE International in United States
Among all the vehicle rollover test procedures, the SAE J2114 dolly rollover test is the most widely used. However, it requires the test vehicle to be seated on a dolly with a 23° initial angle, which makes it difficult to test a vehicle over 5,000 kg without a dolly design change, and repeatability is often a concern. In the current study, we developed and implemented a new dynamic rollover test methodology that can be used for evaluating crashworthiness and occupant protection without requiring an initial vehicle angle. To do that, a custom cart was designed to carry the test vehicle laterally down a track. The cart incorporates two ramps under the testing vehicle’s trailing-side tires. In a test, the cart with the vehicle travels at the desired test speed and is stopped by a track-mounted curb. While the cart is being stopped by two honeycomb blocks, the vehicle slides laterally from the cart with the far-side wheels sliding up the ramps, which generates the desired lateral roll rate. The vehicle near-side wheels slide onto a…
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Evaluation of the Seat Index Point Tool for Military Seats

SAE International Journal of Commercial Vehicles

UMTRI-Sheila Ebert-Hamilton
University of Michigan-Matthew Reed
  • Journal Article
  • 2016-01-0309
Published 2016-04-05 by SAE International in United States
This study evaluated the ISO 5353 Seat Index Point Tool (SIPT) as an alternative to the SAE J826 H-point manikin for measuring military seats. A tool was fabricated based on the ISO specification and a custom back-angle measurement probe was designed and fitted to the SIPT. Comparisons between the two tools in a wide range of seating conditions showed that the mean SIP location was 5 mm aft of the H-point, with a standard deviation of 7.8 mm. Vertical location was not significantly different between the two tools (mean - 0.7 mm, sd 4.0 mm). A high correlation (r=0.9) was observed between the back angle measurements from the two tools. The SIPT was slightly more repeatable across installations and installers than the J826 manikin, with most of the discrepancy arising from situations with flat seat cushion angles and either unusually upright or reclined back angles that caused the J826 manikin to be unstable. The investigators who performed the measurements indicated that the SIPT was easier to use. The data show that the SIPT is a…
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Statistical Modeling of Automotive Seat Shapes

University of Michigan-K. Han Kim, Sheila Ebert-Hamilton, Matthew Reed
Published 2016-04-05 by SAE International in United States
Automotive seats are commonly described by one-dimensional measurements, including those documented in SAE J2732. However, 1-D measurements provide minimal information on seat shape. The goal of this work was to develop a statistical framework to analyze and model the surface shapes of seats by using techniques similar to those that have been used for modeling human body shapes. The 3-D contour of twelve driver seats of a pickup truck and sedans were scanned and aligned, and 408 landmarks were identified using a semi-automatic process. A template mesh of 18,306 vertices was morphed to match the scan at the landmark positions, and the remaining nodes were automatically adjusted to match the scanned surface. A principal component (PC) analysis was performed on the resulting homologous meshes. Each seat was uniquely represented by a set of PC scores; 10 PC scores explained 95% of the total variance. This new shape description has many applications. For instance, seats can be classified and grouped, and the distinctive features and dimensions that characterize each group can be identified. Seats can be…
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